Calendar of Events

Environmental Justice: At the Crossroads with Public Health, Conservation Politics, and Generational Change

Environmental Justice: At the Crossroads with Public Health, Conservation Politics, and Generational Change

February 8, 201410:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Schwartz Outdoor Leadership, Beebe Room

Schwartz Outdoor Leadership, Beebe Room

This program will bring together practitioners and experts in the environmental justice movement who will focus on the interconnected issues of environmental health, and conservation politics. Speakers and participants will also explore and discuss the importance of equity, inclusiveness and diversity for the future of the environmental movement and social change.

Angela Park will be the keynote speaker. Ms. Park is the founder and executive director of Diversity Matters (soon to be Mission Critical), a Fellow of the Sustainability Institute's Donella Meadows Leadership Program, and author of Everybody's Movement: Environmental Justice and Climate Change. Ms. Park is a writer and a consultant to non-profits, governments, foundations, and companies. Much of her work focuses on the integration of social, environmental, and economic issues, and she is a leading expert on equity and diversity in the environmental field in the United States.

This symposium is free to Bowdoin students, staff, and faculty. A $10 registration fee to cover lunch is asked of other participants.

REGISTER HERE.

For more information please contact Rosie Armstrong, 207-725-3396, rarmstro@bowdoin.edu.

CO-SPONSORED BY the Departments of Africana Studies, Earth & Oceanographic Science, Gender & Women's Studies, Government & Legal Studies, History, Math, Philosophy, the Asian Studies Program, Environmental Studies Program, the McKeen Center, and Sustainable Bowdoin.

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Film Screening: "Free Angela and All Political Prisoners" (2012)

Film Screening: "Free Angela and All Political Prisoners" (2012)

February 13, 20147:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Cleaveland 151

Black History Month Film Festival

A documentary that chronicles the life of young college professor Angela Davis, and how her social activism implicates her in a botched kidnapping attempt that ends with a shootout, four dead, and her name on the FBI's 10 Most Wanted list.

102 min.

Brought to you by Africana Studies and the African American Society

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CANCELLED: For the Rights of All: Jim Crow in Alaska

CANCELLED: For the Rights of All: Jim Crow in Alaska

February 13, 20147:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

DUE TO POOR WEATHER CONDITIONS, THIS FILM SCREENING HAS BEEN CANCELLED. This documentary reveals the true-life story of an extraordinary Alaskan woman who became an unlikely hero in the fight for civil rights.

Free.

Sponsored by the Russell and Janet Doubleday Endowment.

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World Cinema Film Festival: "The Return"

World Cinema Film Festival: "The Return"

February 18, 20147:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Bowdoin's World Cinema Film Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students.

The Return (Andrey Zvyagintsev, Russia, 2003) is presented by Kristina Toland (Russian).  In this award-winning thriller, a man returns to his wife and two adolescent sons after a long and unexplained absence. Father and sons embark on a fishing trip, but their quest for reunion becomes a struggle for survival.

Official trailer

For more information, contact the Film Studies Program at (207) 725-3552.

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Soc Anthro Major/Minor OCS Info Session

Soc Anthro Major/Minor OCS Info Session

February 19, 20144:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Adams Hall, Room 208

The Soc Anthro Department is hosting an information session for prospective majors/minors and for current majors/minors considering studying abroad.  Faculty and advanced students will be present to discuss major/minor requirements as well as how to make the most of study abroad opportunities.

Join us for questions and answers and refreshments too!

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Green Career Series: Corporate Sustainability

Green Career Series: Corporate Sustainability

February 19, 20147:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Making a Difference in the Private Sector: Careers in Corporate Sustainability

Panelists include:
Kevin Bright: Sustainability Coordinator, Colby College
Amy Hattan: Corporate Sustainability Officer, Thornton Tomasetti
John Rooks: Sustainability Consultant, President and Founder, The Soap Group
Brad Bowers: Plant Manager, Oakhurst Dairy

Moderated by Katye Charrette- Emerging Professionals Committee, U.S. Green Building Council

Careers in green building are many and varied. Join us to hear from professionals about their careers in Corporate Sustainability. The Green Careers Series is a fun, casual way to learn about green careers and pick the brains of folks who are working in the field. After a moderated discussion with panelists, there will be ample opportunity for Q&A and conversation.

This program is a project of the Emerging Professionals Committee of the U.S. Green Building Council, Maine Chapter, and hosted by the Bowdoin College Career Planning Center and the Environmental Studies Program. Questions? Call 725-3396.

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World Cinema Film Festival: "The Great Beauty"

World Cinema Film Festival: "The Great Beauty"

February 19, 20147:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Bowdoin's World Cinema Film Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students.

The Great Beauty (Paolo Sorrentino, Italy 2013) is presented by Allison Cooper (Italian)and Gretchen Williams '14 (Art History/Italian).  A love letter to Roman decadence, this tragicomedy of Italy's leisured classes is a sensual overload and a scathing commentary on Italian politics and society.

“A deliriously alive movie … a wildly inventive and sometimes thrilling ode to sensibility and to some of its linguistic cousins, like sensation, sensitivity and sentiment.” 
-Manohla Dargis, The New York Times

“A radiant work on the meaning of life … The Great Beauty is drop-dead gorgeous, a film that is luxuriously, seductively, stunningly cinematic. But more than intoxicating imagery is on director Paolo Sorrentino’s mind, a lot more.” 
-Kenneth Turan, The Los Angeles Times

Official trailer

For more information, contact the Film Studies Program at (207) 725-3552.

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World Cinema Film Festival: "The Ambassador"

World Cinema Film Festival: "The Ambassador"

February 20, 20147:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Bowdoin's World Cinema Film Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students.

The Ambassador (Mads Brugger, Denmark, 2011) is presented by Ericka Albaugh (Government) and Evan Bulman (Reed House). Armed with hidden cameras, black-market credentials, and his wit, a journalist transforms himself into the caricature of a European-African consul to expose Africa's blood diamond trade.

A post-screening reception will be provided by the students of Reed House.

Official Trailer

For more information, contact the Film Studies Program at (207) 725-3552

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World Cinema Film Festival: "Please Vote For Me"

World Cinema Film Festival: "Please Vote For Me"

February 22, 20147:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Bowdoin's World Cinema Film Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students.

Please Vote for Me (Weijun Chen, China, 2007) is presented by Shu-chin Tsui (Asian Studies).

A democratic experiment is happening in central China's most populous city: third-grade students are electing a class monitor. Their experience reveals the sacrifices and benefits required by democracy's implementation.

Trailer

For more information, contact the Film Studies Program at (207) 725-3552.

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World Cinema Film Festival: "Blancanieves"

World Cinema Film Festival: "Blancanieves"

February 23, 20147:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Bowdoin's World Cinema Film Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students.

Blancanieves (Pablo Berger, Spain, 2012) is presented by Elena Cueto-Asin (Romance Languages), Tricia Welsch (Film Studies), Birgit Tautz (German), and MacMillan House. This wonderfully eerie silent film treat and Oscar nominee  recasts Snow White as a talented bullfighter in 1920s southern Spain.

A post-screening reception will be provided by the students of MacMillan House.

Official Trailer

For more information, contact the Film Studies Program at (207) 725-3552.

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"Galileo's Reading" Book Presentation by Crystal Hall

"Galileo's Reading" Book Presentation by Crystal Hall

February 27, 20144:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Crystal Hall, Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities with the Digital and Computational Studies Initiative, shares Galileo Galilei's insults written for philosophers and inspired by Italian poets with a reading from her new book. Also, in celebration of Galileo's 450th birthday and 404th anniversary of his observation of the moon and Jupiter, attendees will partake in a live demonstration using Galileoscopes. These telescopes allow one to view things the same as Galileo.

Crystal Hall holds a PhD and an MA in Italian from the University of Pennsylvania.  Her research and teaching draw from the interdisciplinary crossroads of Italian literature, early modern science and philosophy, and digital studies. The research for Galileo's Reading generated the material for her digital humanities project "Galileo's Library" and the conclusions she reached while writing the book are allowing her to test new tools for large-scale text analysis in multilingual bodies of work.

Sponsored by Bowdoin's Digital and Computational Studies Initiative.

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Film: The Eskimo and the Whale

Film: The Eskimo and the Whale

March 27, 20147:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Follow filmmaker Jenn Hofmann as she explores the strength and courage of the Inupiat people struggling to preserve their subsistence whaling culture in the Arctic regions of Alaska.

Presented by the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum and Arctic Studies Center.

Free.




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Jessa Lingel Lecture - Facebook is Anti-Drag: Issues of Online Community and Communication

Jessa Lingel Lecture - Facebook is Anti-Drag: Issues of Online Community and Communication

March 31, 20147:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Online technologies have provided a means of storytelling, visualization, community building, and educational resources that have particular significance for groups that have been historically disenfranchised.

Jessa Lingel addresses the role of technology in the lives of a specific queer community, performers in Brooklyn's drag scene. Her talk addresses both the benefits and limitations of social media platforms for members of this particular set of queer lives and the intersection of queer theory with internet studies.

Jessa Lingel is a postdoctoral research fellow at Microsoft Research New England, working with the Social Media Collective.

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Discussion and Screening of "The Garden" with Director Scott Kennedy Hamilton

Discussion and Screening of  "The Garden" with Director Scott Kennedy Hamilton

March 31, 20147:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Scott Hamilton Kennedy comes to Bowdoin for a discussion and screening of his 2008 Oscar-nominated documentary The Garden. Kennedy's film tells the story of South Central Farm, a community garden and urban farm in Los Angeles. When the landowner decides he no longer wants the farm on his property, the working class families who created and work on South Central Farm protest - confronting a web of backroom land development deals, green politics, and corruption.

Indiewire says of The Garden: "(the film) exposes the fault lines in American society and raises crucial and challenging questions about liberty, equality, and justice for the poorest and most vulnerable among us."

Includes appearances by Danny Glover, Daryl Hannah, Willie Nelson, and Joan Baez.

The Garden website

Sponsored by Lectures and Concerts, the Film Studies Program, the Environmental Studies Program, the Latin American Studies Program, the Center for the Common Good, the Africana Studies Program, and the English Department.

Contact the Film Studies Program at 725-3552 for more information.

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Common Hour with Dan Kahan, Professor of Psychology at Yale Law

Common Hour with Dan Kahan, Professor of Psychology at Yale Law

April 4, 201412:30 PM – 1:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Dan Kahan is the Elizabeth K. Dollard Professor of Law and Professor of Psychology at Yale Law School. In addition to risk perception, his areas of research include science communication and the application of decision science to law and policymaking. He is a member of the Cultural Cognition Project, an interdisciplinary team of scholars who use empirical methods to examine the impact of group values on perceptions of risk and related facts. In studies funded by the National Science Foundation, his research has investigated public disagreement over climate change, public reactions to emerging technologies, and conflicting public impressions of scientific consensus.

For more information and to view the full Spring 2014 Common Hour schedule, please visit: Events and Summer Programs: Common Hour

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Traffic: German Chemists, Austrian Smugglers, and the Cocaine Epidemic in India (1900-1914)

Traffic:  German Chemists, Austrian Smugglers, and the Cocaine Epidemic in India (1900-1914)

April 10, 20147:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

The lecture will be followed by a Q&A, featuring Alison Frank Johnson, Laura Henry, Associate Professor of Government, and Birgit Tautz, Associate Professor of German.

Today, Germany is considered Europe's mighty economic and political power; however, its perceived hegemony conceals not only the complex political situation today but also a past full of complicated political, economic, and cultural entanglements that were indeed global, as Alison Frank Johnson's talk shows.

In the first decades of the twentieth century, one of modern medicine's newest miracle cures was beginning to lose its luster. Cocaine, manufactured according to a patented process by Merck pharmaceuticals in Darmstadt, Germany, could quell pain and facilitate delicate surgeries like no other drug, but it was addictive and increasingly linked to criminality by temperance advocates. Simultaneously in the United States and India (two parts of the world where cocaine addiction caused the greatest concern), some physicians and social workers led a campaign to curtail its use. To get cocaine from Europe to India while circumventing increasing regulation, smugglers relied on lax oversight on one of Europe's largest steamship companies, the Austrian Lloyd. In this talk, Johnson links cocaine manufacturing in Germany and consumption habits in India together through new transportation networks of steamships and railways. The story of cocaine smuggling on Austrian ships reveals the challenges free trade imperialism posed to intermediate Great Powers like Austria-Hungary as they tried to participate in global commerce without being able to write its rules.

Alison Frank Johnson is Professor of History & Associate Director, Center for History and Economics at Harvard University. Her teaching and research focus on transnational approaches to the history of central and eastern Europe. Johnson teaches courses on the global history of commodities and European environmental history as well as courses on the Habsburg Empire and its successor states in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Her first book, Oil Empire: Visions of Prosperity in Austrian Galicia (2005), was awarded the Barbara Jelavich 2006 book prize, the Austrian Cultural Forum 2006 Book Prize, and the Polish Studies Association 2006 Orbis Book Prize. Her second book (now in progress), Invisible Empire: A New Global History of Austria, argues that the Habsburg Monarchy was an imperial power, if not a colonizing power. Austria-Hungary's engagement with maritime commerce created welcome opportunities to solidify Austria-Hungary's position as a great power - but also unforeseen challenges, as Austria became entangled in trafficking, smuggling, and the slave trade.

A "Germany In Europe" Campus Weeks event, sponsored by the German Embassy and the Bowdoin College German Department with additional funding from the History Department.

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AIDS is a Kinship Disease: Orphan Care and the Changing Family in Lesotho

AIDS is a Kinship Disease: Orphan Care and the Changing Family in Lesotho

April 14, 20146:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Adams Hall, Room 208

In Ellen Block's talk, titled AIDS is a Kinship Disease: Orphan Care and the Changing Family in Lesotho, she argues that AIDS is best understood through its definitive connections with kinship practices as its impact reaches beyond the individual who is sick, transforming families and reflecting broader concerns about societal change. Rather than simply maintaining that people respond to the problem of AIDS by drawing on sociality and cultural ideologies, she argues that AIDS is at the center of a crisis in African kinship and that orphan care provides a lens through which to examine the complex webs of belief, social relations, biomedical practices, and structural realities which characterize the crisis. She will illuminate two key areas where this relational view of AIDS is exhibited and where the intersections of AIDS and kinship is revealed.  First, she discusses the way in which biomedical knowledge is filtered through a social lens in order to shape Basotho’s understanding of AIDS’ impact on the body.  Second, she explores how the presence of AIDS orphans has changed household configurations.  She will show how the negotiations for AIDS orphans has served to simultaneously reinforce patrilineal and patriarchal values, while fundamentally shifting caregiving practices to favor matrilocality.

Sponsored by the Departments of Sociology & Anthropology, Gender & Women's Studies, and the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund

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Criminal Births: Infanticide, Stillbirth and the Rio de Janeiro Police, 1890-1940

Criminal Births: Infanticide, Stillbirth and the Rio de Janeiro Police, 1890-1940

April 17, 20144:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Edward Pols House, Conference Room

During Brazil's First Republic (1889-1930) and into the early Vargas era (1930-1937) in the capital city of Rio de Janeiro, police were involved in poor women's reproductive lives. Scholars studying women's reproductive practices in Brazil during that time period have conducted narrow examinations of legal documents pertaining to abortion, infanticide, and child abandonment. On the contrary, Cassia Roth ('08) will demonstrate that police investigations conflated fertility control practices such as abortion and infanticide with non-criminal occurrences like miscarriage and stillbirth. She will delineate the expansion of a de facto criminality surrounding practices related to and often confused with fertility control under the 1890 Penal Code (1890-1940) and contend that the police investigated the unfortunate but common occurrences of stillbirths as possible infanticides. Drawing on police investigations of infanticide, stillbirths, and birth-related infant deaths in Rio de Janeiro, Cassia argues that the state's incursion into poor women's reproductive lives transformed events like a difficult delivery or a stillbirth into potential crimes.

Join us for this lecture
Thursday, April 17, 4:15 pm
Edward Pols House Seminar Room


Cassia Roth '08 is a Ph.D. Candidate in History, UCLA

Free and open to the public. Sponsored by the Latin American Studies Program, Gender and Women's Studies Program, and the History Department.

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Arctic Museum Exhibit Opening Talk - What is in Your Cabinet of Curiosities?

Arctic Museum Exhibit Opening Talk - What is in Your Cabinet of Curiosities?

April 17, 20144:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Susan A. Kaplan, Director of the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum and Arctic Studies Center, will give an illustrated talk titled, "What is in Your Cabinet of Curiosities?" on April 17, 2014 at 4 p.m. in Kresge Auditorium, Visual Arts Center.

The talk is in conjunction with the opening of a new exhibit at the Arctic Museum titled, Cape Dorset and Beyond: Inuit Art from the Marcia and Robert Ellis Collection.

A reception and chance to view the new exhibit will take place in Hubbard Hall following the talk.

For information call 725-3062. Free.

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A Reading by Author Elizabeth Strout

A Reading by Author Elizabeth Strout

April 17, 20147:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Elizabeth Strout will read from her recent novel, The Burgess Boys (2013).

Strout is the author of numerous short stories and three novels, including Amy and Isabelle, which was shortlisted for the 2000 Orange Prize and nominated for the 2000 PEN/Faulkner Award for fiction, and Olive Kitteridge, a collection of connected short stories about a woman and her family and friends on the coast of Maine, for which Strout won the Pulitzer Prize in 2009.

Strout also has been a professor at Colgate University and on the faculty of the MFA program at Queens University of Charlotte.

Open to the public free of charge. Call the English Department at 725-3552 for more information.

Sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund and the English Department.

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The Grassroots Gang: Politics, Violence, and Development in a Haitian Ghetto

The Grassroots Gang: Politics, Violence, and Development in a Haitian Ghetto

April 23, 20145:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

The Grassroots Gang: Politics, Violence, and Development in a Haitian Ghetto

Please join us as Dr. Kivland explores the relationship between street gangs, grassroots community politics, the state, and international development and aid organizations in Port-au-Prince Haiti.

Wednesday, April 23, 2014
5:00 pm
VAC Beam


Chelsey Kivland is the McKennan Postdoctoral Fellow at Dartmouth College and is a cultural and political anthropologist who studies street politics and violence in urban Haiti. Her writing has appeared in the Journal of Haitian Studies, Political and Legal Anthropology Review, and Cultural Anthropology, and she is currently preparing a book entitled "Street Sovereigns: Politics, Violence, and Development in Urban Haiti."

Sponsored by: the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Latin American Studies, and the Charles F. Adams Lectureship Fund.

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Human Trafficking Q&A

Human Trafficking Q&A

April 24, 201412:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Thorne Hall, Pinette Dining Room

June Guo will share insights from her recent experience attending the Not Here conference on Human Trafficking. She will be joined by a panel of faculty and other concerned students to answer questions, examine the local and global dimensions of the problem, and discuss what Bowdoin can do to make a difference on this issue.

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Film: Vanishing Point (2012)

Film: Vanishing Point (2012)

April 24, 20147:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

7 PM - April 24, 2014
Smith Auditorium, Sills Hall

Navarana is an Inughuit elder from the northern district of Greenland.  In the 1860s, her ancestor led a legendary Inuit migration to Greenland.  More than 150 years later,  Navarana connects with distant cousins and explores these two isolated groups.

Trailer:http://www.nfb.ca/film/vanishing_point/trailer/vanishing_point_trailer/

Website: http://www.meltwatermedia.ca/site/Vanishing-Point-movie.html


Free.

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Hawaiian Hip Hop, Drag Queens, and the Refusal of Aloha

Hawaiian Hip Hop, Drag Queens, and the Refusal of Aloha

April 24, 20147:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Adams Hall, Room 208

F-you aloha, I love you: Hawaiian Hip Hop, Drag Queens, and the Refusal of Aloha

Lani Teves, PhD in American culture, weaves together indigenous studies, critical race theory, gender and sexuality studies, and Pacific studies in her work. She is a postdoc at the University of California-Berkeley.

Join us:

Thursday, April 24th
7:00 p.m.
Adams Hall 208


In Hawaii, the spirit of aloha is pervasive, and it is mobilized to sell everything from hula skirts to fantasies of diversity to plumbing to same-sex marriage. Loosely defined as love, aloha is frequently used as a greeting and moniker of Hawaiianness. Hawaii state law even sanctions aloha, advising lawmakers to consider the aloha spirit in the workplace. Promoted as the so-called seminal Hawaiian concept of love and inclusion, the extraction of aloha from Hawaiian culture, works to obscure troubling material realities that marginalize Native Hawaiians. At the same time, Native Hawaiians deeply believe in aloha and perform it because we believe that aloha connects us to our ancestors. In this talk, she weaves together Marxist, post-colonial, and performance theory to provide a historical and theoretical framing of alohas ideological significance for the state of Hawaii and for Native Hawaiians. She shifts the focus away from disparaging the appropriation of aloha to look instead at the generative tensions that require Native Hawaiians to perform aloha and how Native Hawaiians engage with aloha by performing it. Through a close reading of the work of a Native Hawaiian rapper from a Hawaiian homestead, as well as a Native Hawaiian drag queen, she offers an examination of how aloha is performed and sustained in a manner that evades the optics of the state and tourisms' commodifying gaze.

Sponsored by: the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Gay and Lesbian Studies, and the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund

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Must Mediterranean Men be Masculine? Reflections on a Stereotype

Must Mediterranean Men be Masculine? Reflections on a Stereotype

April 24, 20147:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Michael Herzfeld is Ernest E. Monrad Professorof the Social Sciences in the Department of Anthropology at Harvard University,where he has taught since 1991. The author of ten books -- including APlace in History (1991), Cultural Intimacy (1997), TheBody Impolitic (2004), and Evicted from Eternity (2009)-- and numerous articles and reviews, he has also produced two ethnographicfilms (Monti Moments[2007] and Roman Restaurant Rhythms [2011]).His honors include the J.I. Staley Prize and the Rivers Memorial Medal (both in1994) and honorary doctorates from the Université Libre de Bruxelles (2005),the University of Macedonia, Thessaloniki (2011), and the University of Crete(2013). He has served as editor of American Ethnologist (1995-98) and iscurrently editor-at-large (responsible for "Polyglot Perspectives")at Anthropological Quarterly. He is also a member of the editorial boards ofseveral journals, including International Journal of Heritage Studies,Anthropology Today, and South East Asia Research. His research in Greece,Italy, and Thailand has addressed the social and political impact of historicconservation and gentrification, the dynamics of nationalism and bureaucracy,and the ethnography of knowledge among artisans and intellectuals. He is currentlyworking on a book and a film about the politics of heritage and spatiality inBangkok.

Sponsored by the Mellon Initiative in Mediterranean Studies.

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Matthew W. Wilson Lecture: Quantified Self-City-Nation: Digital Systems for Attentional Control

Matthew W. Wilson Lecture: Quantified Self-City-Nation: Digital Systems for Attentional Control

April 28, 20147:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Matthew Wilson's presentation draws parallels between the rising consumer-electronic sector associated with personal activity monitors and the rapid visioning of smart urbanism. He interrogates developments in interoperability and propriety, competition and habit, fashion and surveillance. He addresses the social-cultural and political implications for this refiguring of spatial thought and action as well as the capacities reinforced and developed through the implementation of these technologies and techniques.

Matthew Wilson is currently Visiting Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning and Design at the Graduate School of Design and Visiting Scholar at the Center for Geographic Analysis at Harvard University and Assistant Professor of Geography at the University of Kentucky, where he co-directs the New Mapping Collaboratory. Matt holds a PhD in Geography from the University of Washington. His website is http://matthew-w-wilson.com.

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DamNation Film Screening

DamNation Film Screening

May 4, 20147:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

This powerful film odyssey across America explores the sea change in our national attitude from pride in big dams as engineering wonders to the growing awareness that our own future is bound to the life and health of our rivers. Dam removal has moved beyond the fictional Monkey Wrench Gang to go mainstream. Where obsolete dams come down, rivers bound back to life, giving salmon and other wild fish the right of return to primeval spawning rounds, after decades without access. DamNation's majestic cinematography and unexpected discoveries move through rivers and landscapes altered by dams, but also through a metamorphosis in values, from conquest of the natural world to knowing ourselves as part of nature.

Watch the trailer:

Open to the public free of charge. Sponsored by the Economics Department and the Environmental Studies Program.

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