Spring 2015 Calendar of Events

Race, Ethnicity and Politics: Honoring the Life and Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

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January 19, 2015 1:00 PM  – 4:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

In observance of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Professor Cory Gooding's class, Government and Legal Studies/Africana Studies 2052 Race, Ethnicity and Politics, will honor the life and legacy of Dr. King.

The class will meet from 1:00 to 4:00 pm in Kresge Auditorium and will include two panel discussions:

  • 1:15-2:15 pm  Learning from King and the Civil Rights Movement
  • 2:30-3:30 pm  King and the Common Good: Discussing King's Impact on Bowdoin

Bowdoin faculty, staff and students who do not have other obligations are welcome to join us for either or both panels.

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Tanya Tagaq in Concert with 'Nanook of the North'

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January 25, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Memorial Hall, Pickard Theater

This event is sold out; a limited number of tickets may become available at the door.

Internationally acclaimed performer Tanya Tagaq will appear in concert in Pickard Auditorium, Bowdoin College at 7 pm on Sunday January 25, 2015. This avant-garde music sensation will create exciting new music against the backdrop of the Inuit film Nanook of the North. Admission is free, but tickets are required. Tickets can be picked up at the Smith Union Information Desk on the college campus beginning January 19, 2015.

Tagaq is a ground-breaking performer who has taken the traditional Inuit throat-singing she heard growing up in Cambridge Bay in the Canadian Arctic and transformed it, infusing it with jazz, punk, and other contemporary music, to create an exciting new sound. Reviewers describe her performances as "fierce," "exquisite," "unnerving," and"emotionally gripping."

She evokes the sounds, visions, and emotions of the northern landscape with her remarkable voice. Tagaq has performed with musicians ranging from Bjork and the Kronos Quartet to the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra. In 2014 she was awarded the Polaris Music Prize, one of Canada's top music awards, and her newest album, Animism, was listed as one of the top albums of 2014 by CBC Radio.

Nanook of the North, Robert Flaherty's classic 1922 silent film about life among the Inuit of northern Quebec, is regarded as one of the forerunners of modern documentary films. In 2012, Toronto International Film Festival commissioned composer Derek Charke, along with Tagaq, and her collaborators violinist Jesse Zubot and percussionist Jean Martin, to create a new soundscape for this silent classic. Drawing on her love of her northern home, Tagaq brings a depth of emotion and understanding to Flaherty's essentially colonial vision, reclaiming Nanook for contemporary Inuit.

This concert is presented by the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum and Arctic Studies Center with support from the Departments of Music, Cinema Studies, and Sociology and Anthropology, Student Activities, the President's Office Wabanaki Initiative, and the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund.

Tanya Tagaq in concert with Nanook of the North was commissioned by TIFF Bell Lightbox as part of its film retrospective First Peoples Cinema: 1500 Nations, One Tradition.

For more information call Kristi Clifford at 725-3062, or visit the museum's web page www.bowdoin.edu/arctic-museum


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Film Screening: Charlie Hebdo Documentary, "C'est Dur D'être Aimé Par Des Cons"

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January 30, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

In the aftermath of the attacks in Paris at the beginning of this month, the Bowdoin French Club, the Famille Francophone, will be holding a public screening of Daniel Leconte's 2008 documentary, C'est Dur D'être Aimé Par Des Cons (“It’s tough being loved by jerks”). The film follows the 2006 court case that was brought against the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in the wake of their decision to publish cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammad. It will be shown in French with English subtitles, with discussion to follow in English.  

The movie offers fascinating and unprecedented insight behind the scenes at this controversial publication. It also raises important questions about free speech and satire in France, a country with very different laws concerning freedom of expression. The discussion will provide an opportunity to reflect on these questions as well as the social and political consequences of recent events.

The Bowdoin Famille Francophone (aka “Bowdoin French Club”) is a student-run organization operating under the auspices of the Bowdoin Student Government. It seeks to promote Francophone values, culture and interests to the wider Bowdoin College community.

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Film: 'For the Rights of All: Ending Jim Crow in Alaska'

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February 5, 2015 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

In observance of Black History Month the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum and Arctic Studies Center presents the film, For the Rights of All: Ending Jim Crow in Alaska.

This one-hour, award winning documentary reveals the true-life story of an extraordinary Alaskan woman who becomes an unlikely hero in the fight for civil rights. Like Native Americans in the lower forty-eight states, Alaska Natives struggled to keep their basic human rights, as well as protect their ancient ties to the land. The Bill of Rights did not apply to them.

Elizabeth Peratrovich, a young Tlingit woman and mother of three, testified before the Alaska Territorial Senate in 1945 and swayed their vote with her compelling testimony in favor of the Anti-Discrimination Act, the first civil rights bill passed in the U.S. since the Civil War.


Free and open to the public.

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Second Annual World Cinema Festival: 'The Tribe' - with Kristina Toland

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February 16, 2015 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Newly arrived at a boarding school for the deaf, student Sergey quickly realizes he must win the protection of the school gang’s leader to survive. He assimilates into "the tribe" --an institutional system of organized crime involving robbery and prostitution--but compromises his position when he falls in love with a female classmate, who is also one of the gang’s sex workers. Using no spoken dialogue or subtitles, the film unfolds through body language and sign language from its cast of deaf, non-professional actors. 

Winner of the Critics' Week Grand Prix at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival, The Tribe (Miroslav Slaboshpitsky, Ukraine, 2014), is presented by Kristina Toland, visiting assistant professor, Russian. 

Bowdoin’s World Cinema Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students. 

The public is welcomed at no charge and tickets are not required.

The 2nd Annual World Cinema Festival is sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, the Latin American Studies Program, the Asian Studies Program, the Africana Studies Program, the Russian Department, the German Department, the Romance Languages Department, the English Department, MacMillan House, the Bowdoin Film Society, and the Cinema Studies Program.


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Second Annual World Cinema Festival: 'The German Doctor' - with Carolyn Wolfenzon

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February 17, 2015 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Patagonia, 1960. A German doctor meets an Argentinean family and joins them on a long desert road to a small town where they will be starting a new life. Eva, Enzo and their three children welcome the doctor into their home and entrust their young daughter, Lilith to his care, not knowing they are harboring one of the most dangerous criminals in the world and that Israeli agents are desperately looking to bring him to justice. 

The German Doctor (Lucía Puenzo, Argentina, 2013) is the true story of the family who lived with Josef Mengele, the German SS officer known as the "Angel of Death," without knowing his true identity. It also follows the girl who fell in love with one of the most heinous criminals of all time in the years he spent "hiding" in South America following his escape from Germany. 

Presented by Carolyn Wolfenzon, assistant professor of romance languages.

Bowdoin’s World Cinema Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students. 

The public is welcomed at no charge and tickets are not required.

The 2nd Annual World Cinema Festival is sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, the Latin American Studies Program, the Asian Studies Program, the Africana Studies Program, the Russian Department, the Romance Languages Department, the English Department, MacMillan House, the Bowdoin Film Society, and the Cinema Studies Program.

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Second Annual World Cinema Festival: 'God Loves Uganda' - with Hanetha Vete-Congolo and Laura Premack

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February 18, 2015 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

As an American-influenced bill to make homosexuality punishable by death wins widespread support, tension in Uganda mounts and an atmosphere of murderous hatred takes hold. This film reveals the conflicting motives of faith and greed, ecstasy and egotism, among Ugandan ministers, American evangelical leaders and the foot soldiers of a theology that sees Uganda as ground zero in a battle for billions of souls. Through verité, interviews, and hidden camera footage – and with unprecedented access – God Loves Uganda takes viewers inside the evangelical movement in both the US and Uganda.

Presented by Hanétha Vété-Congolo, Associate Professor of Romance Languages and Laura Premack, Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow of Latin American Studies, God Loves Uganda (Roger Ross Williams, US, 2013), is a NY Times Critic’s Pick, winner of the Inspiration Award at the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, and official selection at Sundance, HotDocs, and AFI Docs. 

Bowdoin’s World Cinema Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students.

The public is welcomed at no charge and tickets are not required.

The 2nd Annual World Cinema Festival is sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, the Latin American Studies Program, the Asian Studies Program, the African Studies Program, the Russian Department, the German Department, the Romance Languages Department, the English Department, MacMillan House, the Bowdoin Film Society, and the Cinema Studies Program.

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CANCELLED - Cristina Malcomson: "Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society"

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February 19, 2015 4:30 PM  – 5:30 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER.
For more information, contact the English Department coordinator at 725-3552 or lholland@bowdoin.edu.

In her most recent book, Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society: Boyle, Cavendish, Swift (Ashgate, 2013), Cristina Malcolmson demonstrates how unstable the idea of race remained in England at the end of the seventeenth century, and yet how extensively the intertwined institutions of government, colonialism, the slave trade, and science were collaborating to usher it into public view. Arguing that the early Royal Society moved science toward racialization by giving skin color a new prominence as an object of experiment and observation, Malcolmson provides the first book-length examination of studies of skin color in the society. She also brings new light to the relationship between early modern literature, science, and the establishment of scientific racism in the nineteenth century.

Malcolmson,  professor of English at Bates College, has also written The 'Empire of Man over the Inferior Creatures': British Women, Race, and Seventeenth-Century Science for The Palgrave History of British Women's Writing, and a collaborative article with Ruth Paley (first author) and Michael Hunter on 'Parliament and Slavery 1660-c.1700' which appeared in the journal Slavery and Abolition in 2010.

Sponsored by the English Department

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Andreas Muenchow: "The American Passage to the North Pole: Ice, Oceans, Glaciers, and Climates of Nares Strait"

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February 19, 2015 7:00 PM  – 8:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Andreas Muenchow, associate professor of physical ocean science and engineering at the University of Delaware's College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment, is a sea-going oceanographer interested in how physics of polar and coastal oceans impacts global climate. He will discuss the work he and colleagues did between 2003 through 2012 to understand the physics of water and ice movement in Nares Strait, using icebreakers, remote sensors, computers, and innovative engineering to collect and analyze data on the ice, the water, and the air.

Nares Strait is the narrow passage between Greenland and Canada's Ellesmere Island. Few people realize that it carries as much water from the Arctic Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean as the much wider Fram Strait between Greenland and the Svalbard Islands to the east. Understanding the dynamics of ice and water transport through this strait is crucial to developing accurate models of current and future Arctic Ice and climate.

This presentation is free and open to the public.

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Second Annual World Cinema Festival: 'A Touch of Sin' - with Shu-chin Tsui

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February 19, 2015 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

An angry miner, enraged by widespread corruption in his village, decides to take justice into his own hands. A rootless migrant discovers the infinite possibilities of owning a firearm. A young receptionist, who dates a married man and works at a local sauna, is pushed beyond her limits by an abusive client. And a young factory worker goes from one discouraging job to the next, only to face increasingly degrading circumstances. This daring, poetic and grand-scale film focuses on four characters, each living in different provinces, who are driven to violent ends. 

Written and directed by master filmmaker Jia Zhangke (China, 2013) and presented by Shu-Chin Tsui, professor of Asian studies and cinema studies, A Touch of Sin is the winner of Best Screenplay at the Cannes Film Festival, and an official selection of the 2013 NYFF. 

Bowdoin’s World Cinema Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students. 

The public is welcomed at no charge and tickets are not required.

The 2nd Annual World Cinema Festival is sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, the Latin American Studies Program, the Asian Studies Program, the African Studies Program, the Russian Department, the German Department, the Romance Languages Department, the English Department, MacMillan House, the Bowdoin Film Society, and the Cinema Studies Program.

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Second Annual World Cinema Festival: 'A Coffee in Berlin' - with Birgit Tautz

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February 20, 2015 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Twenty-something college dropout Niko is going nowhere fast. He lives for the moment as he drifts through the streets of Berlin, curiously observing everyone around him and oblivious to his growing status as an outsider. Then on one fateful day, through a series of absurdly amusing encounters, everything changes. Unable to ignore the consequences of his passivity any longer, Niko finally concludes that he has to engage with life. 

Shot in timeless black and white and enriched with a snappy jazz soundtrack, A Coffee in Berlin (Jan Ole Gerster, Germany, 2014) is a love letter to Berlin and the Generation Y experience. Presented by Birgit Tautz, Associate Professor of German, and the Bowdoin Film Society, this slacker dramedy is the winner of six German Oscar Awards including Best Film, Best Director, and Best Actor. 
 
Bowdoin’s World Cinema Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students. 

The public is welcomed at no charge and tickets are not required.

The 2nd Annual World Cinema Festival is sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, the Latin American Studies Program, the Asian Studies Program, the Africana Studies Program, the Russian Department, the German Department, the Romance Languages Department, the English Department, MacMillan House, the Bowdoin Film Society, and the Cinema Studies Program.

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Intersections: People, Planet, Power

February 24, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Thorne Hall, Daggett Lounge

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Portland Playback Theater: "Letting the World In: Stories of Discovery"

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February 26, 2015 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

The Portland Playback Theater comes to campus for a wonderful evening of storytelling and improv theater! This troupe of highly-trained, multi-talented actors featuring Erin Curren, visiting lecturer in French, will "playback" audience stories of discovery, difficulty, culture, realization and more. The group joins the art of improvisation with real-life stories spontaneously shared by members of the audience. Using movement, dialogue and music, the actors seek to honor the countless moments and events that shape our lives. 

Portland Playback Theatre Company was founded in Portland, Maine in 2005. The Playback Theatre style models transformation; a new way to relate to the world. When trained playback practitioners enact a story told by a member of the audience, a deep bond of understanding is established between the “teller” and the audience. Playback helps people see their common humanity. When people join together in sharing their stories and watching the re-enactments, it engenders an ability to focus on commonalities rather then judgments of otherness.  

Hosted by the Off Campus Study office, along with the McKeen Center and other offices on campus.

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Hester Blum: "Polar Imprints: The News from the Ends of the Earth"

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March 2, 2015 6:00 PM  – 7:30 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Narratives of polar voyages enjoyed wide circulation in Anglo-American cultural and political spheres during the long nineteenth century. Yet the familiar travel accounts of adventurous voyage and their fictional counterparts were not the only forms of literary production generated by Arctic and Antarctic exploration. Many expeditions brought a surprising piece of equipment aboard ship: a printing press. With such presses, polar-voyaging sailors wrote and printed newspapers, broadsides, plays, and other reading matter beyond the Arctic and Antarctic Circles; these publications were produced almost exclusively for a reading audience comprised of the expedition’s crew members. 

In this presentation, Hester Blum, associate professor of English at Pennsylvania State University, will examine the first printed polar newspapers. What does this drive toward what she calls “extreme printing” tell us about the state of print culture and coterie publication in the nineteenth century Anglo-American world? Her talk will be attentive to the rhetorical distance between mass-published voyage accounts, and the coterie publications produced and circulated aboard ship. 'Polar Imprints' is attuned to the tension between the global ambitions of polar voyages, and the remarkably circumscribed conditions of their practice.

Sponsored by Africana Studies, Arctic Studies, and the English Department.

Free and Open to the Public

Note: This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin’s Live Webcasts page.

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