Calendar of Events

Community Lecture Series: The Growth of Multi-Culturalism at Bowdoin

Community Lecture Series: The Growth of Multi-Culturalism at Bowdoin

September 4, 2014 12:30 PM  – 1:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge


Roy Partridge, visiting assistant professor of sociology and anthropology and special assistant to the President for multicultural affairs, came to Bowdoin College in the early 1990s. He is an ordained Episcopal priest and holds degrees from Oberlin, University of Michigan, and Harvard.

Lectures take place 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the Main Lounge of Moulton Union and include time for questions from the audience. Arrive at noon with a bag lunch. Beverages and cookies provided. The lectures are free and open to the public. Questions? Call 207-725-3253.



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Jack Gieseking Book Launch: "People, Place, Space Reader"

Jack Gieseking Book Launch: "People, Place, Space Reader"

September 10, 2014 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Join Jack Gieseking, Bowdoin’s New Media and Data Visualization Specialist, at the launching of her book “The People, Place, and Space Reader". Edited by Dr. Gieseking and William Mangold, the book brings together the writings of scholars from a variety of fields to make sense of the ways we shape and inhabit our world. An essential resource for students of urban studies, geography, design, sociology, and anyone with an interest in the environment, this volume presents the most dynamic and critical understanding of space and place available.

Professor Matt Klingle will serve as interlocutor, facilitating a discussion of the book.

With a B.A. from Mt Holyoke, an M.A. from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. from CUNY, Dr. Gieseking joined the faculty at Bowdoin in Fall 2013.

Sponsored by Bowdoin's Digital and Computational Studies Initiative.

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Maine to Greenland: Exploring the Maritime Far Northeast

Maine to Greenland: Exploring the Maritime Far Northeast

September 25, 2014 7:00 PM  – 8:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Smithsonian Institution Arctic archaeologist William Fitzhugh and Maine-based photographer Wilfred Richard will speak Thursday, September 25 at 7:00 pm in Kresge Auditorium, on the Bowdoin College campus. Their illustrated lecture coincides with the release of their new book, Maine to Greenland: Exploring the Maritime Far Northeast, published by the Smithsonian Institution Press. Following the lecture there will be a reception at the Arctic Museum, where they will sign copies of their book. Also visitors will have a chance to view an exhibit of some of Richard’s photographs. The lecture and reception are free and open to the public.

William Fitzhugh has spent over three decades studying cultures of northern Canada, Alaska, Siberia, Mongolia, and Scandinavia. His work as an archaeologist and anthropologist has focused on the cultural and environmental history of Labrador and southern Quebec, the evolution of maritime cultures, contact between native populations and Europeans, and the origins of reindeer herding. He is the head of the Arctic Studies Center at the Smithsonian Institution.

Wilfred Richard is a geographer, photographer, Registered Maine Guide, and research fellow at the Ummannaq Polar Institute in Greenland. He has traveled extensively throughout New England, the Arctic, and Subarctic, photographing landscapes and seascapes, terrestrial and marine floral and fauna, and the everyday activities of local residents and visiting scientists. He has exhibited his photographs widely.

Using fascinating personal stories and stunning photographs, Fitzhugh and Richard will introduce the audience to people and places throughout the northern North Atlantic and explain both the importance and allure of this region. Their appearance is sponsored by the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum and Arctic Studies Center, Bowdoin College.

The Arctic Museum is open Tuesday-Saturday 10:00 am to 5:00 pm, and from 2:00 pm to 5:00 pm Sundays. Admission to the museum is free. The Museum is closed Mondays and on national holidays. For more information please call the Arctic Museum at 207-725-3416

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And Still We Rise [Davis Robinson]

And Still We Rise [Davis Robinson]

September 27, 2014 7:30 PM  – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

"And Still We Rise Productions" (www.andstillwerise.org)  was founded in 2005 as an outgrowth of a series of "emotional literacy" workshops sponsored by the Houses of Healing Project (www.lionheart.org)  at the Suffolk County Jail in Boston, the Ariel Group’s Outreach Program (www.arielgroup.com),  and the Side-by-Side Community Circle, a reintegration program created to help former inmates successfully find their way back into society.

"And Still We Rise" is a vibrant community of theater artists and social justice advocates.  Now in its tenth season of performances and workshops, ASWR is led by men and women who have spent years in prison. Together with their family members and loved-ones, they use the art of storytelling to create a crucible for healing, public awareness, and social change through empowering the voices of formerly incarcerated individuals.

Weaving their stories into an imaginative fabric built on true experience,  performers move audiences toward greater understanding and compassion for those - both inside and out - whose lives have been directly impacted by the prison system.

Sponsored by the Department of Theater and Dance, with generous support from  the Alice Cooper Morse Fund for the Performing Arts.

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Laura McClure: "Women and Theater in Classical Athens"

Laura McClure: "Women and Theater in Classical Athens"

October 1, 2014 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Laura McClure is Jane Ellen Harrison Professor of Classics at the University of Wisconsin.  Professor McClure received her Ph.D. in Classical Languages and Literatures from the University of Chicago in 1991. Her research interests include Athenian drama, the study of women in the ancient world, and classical reception. Her books focus on representations of women in Athenian drama: Spoken Like a Woman: Speech and Gender in Athenian Drama (Princeton, 1999) and Courtesans at Table: Gender and Greek Literary Culture in Athenaeus (Routledge 2003). She has edited three volumes on the subject of women in antiquity, including Making Silence Speak: Women's Voices in Greek Literature and Society, with Andre Lardinois (Princeton, 2001), Prostitutes and Courtesans in the Ancient World, with C. A. Faraone (Wisconsin, 2006), and Sexuality and Gender in the Classical World (Blackwell, 2008). She has published numerous articles, most recently an analysis of the role of women in tragic recognition scenes. She is currently completing a textbook about women in ancient Greece and Rome (under contract with Blackwell). While on research leave in 2014-15, she plans to work on a new project on women and memory in Greek tragedy. She regularly teaches advanced Greek language courses, Women and Gender in the Classical World, Civilization of Ancient Greece, and Ancient Drama in translation.


Sponsored by the Mellon Humanities Initiative--Studies in the Mediterranean, the Jasper Jacob Stahl Lectureship Fund, and the Department of Classics.

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Ryan Cordell Lecture "Viral Texts and the Technologies of Authorship"

Ryan Cordell Lecture "Viral Texts and the Technologies of Authorship"

October 6, 2014 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Ryan Cordell will draw on the Viral Texts project at Northeastern University (http://www.viraltexts.org) to demonstrate how computational methods such as text mining, mapping, and network analysis can illuminate nineteenth-century systems of circulation, reprinting, and remediation systemically and at scale. Dr. Cordell’s project focuses on the viral culture that enlivened nineteenth-century periodical production, distribution, and consumption. Though the term “viral culture” is new, many of the practices it describes—especially the sharing, remixing, and repurposing of cultural materials—emerged long before the twenty-first century.

Ryan Cordell is Assistant Professor of English at Northeastern University and Core Founding Faculty Member in the NULab for Texts, Maps, and Networks. His scholarship focuses on convergences among literary, periodical, and religious culture in antebellum American mass media.

This lecture is underwritten by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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Alonzo Plough: "Building Together a Culture of Health"

Alonzo Plough: "Building Together a Culture of Health"

October 8, 2014 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Alonzo L. Plough, Vice President, Research-Evaluation-Learning and Chief Science Officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, will discuss the Foundation's new vision for working together to create a culture of health so that everyone in our diverse nation can lead healthy lives now and in future generations. Before joining RWJF, Plough was director of emergency preparedness and response at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, where he served from 2009-2013. He also served as vice president of strategy, planning and evaluation for the California Endowment from 2005-2009; and as the director and health officer for the Seattle and King County Department of Public Health, and professor of health services at the University of Washington School of Public Health in Seattle. Plough earned his PhD and MA at Cornell University and his MPH at Yale University School of Medicine's Department of Epidemiology and Public Health. He did his undergraduate work at St. Olaf College, where he earned a BA. Dr. Plough's visit to Bowdoin is sponsored by the Office of the President and the Department of Sociology and Anthropology.

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Pop-Up Museum: Wish You Were Here! Travel Souvenirs

Pop-Up Museum: Wish You Were Here! Travel Souvenirs

October 8, 2014 6:30 PM  – 8:30 PM
David Saul Smith Union, Morrell Lounge

A Pop-Up Museum is a temporary exhibit created by the people who show up at a venue to display their objects and share information about them.  It lasts a few hours and then is gone!

Do you have a favorite kind of object you collect when traveling?  Bring it to Smith Union the evening of October 8th.  Bowdoin College students and staff from Bowdoin's two museums and library will help you exhibit your treasure and share a story about it.  Or just come and see what others have brought!

*Bring an item that you can easily display on
  a table.
*Please, no live animals or plants.
*No weapons or objects that look like
  weapons.
*Nothing that requires an external source of
  power.

Sponsored by the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum, Bowdoin College Museum of Art, and Bowdoin College Library.




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Film: The Secret of the Grain

Film: The Secret of the Grain

October 15, 2014 7:30 PM  – 10:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

The Secret of the Grain (French: La graine et le mulet, also released internationally as Couscous) is a 2007 Franco-Tunisian drama film directed by Abdellatif Kechiche. The film stars Habib Boufares as an aging immigrant from the Maghreb whose ambition to establish a successful restaurant as an inheritance for his large and disparate family meets skeptical opposition from the French bureaucracy. 

The screening is organized in conjunction with the upcoming exhibition Revealing Mediterranean Women at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, and other activities around the topic of gender and sexualities in the Mediterranean. 

It will be followed by a conversation with Hanétha Vété- Congolo (French) Russell Hopley (Arabic) and Amina Ben Ismail (17’). 

Open to the public free of charge. For more information call 207-725-3782. Sponsored by the Mellon Initiative in Mediterranean Studies.

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Byrd and I: A Northern Evening with Rev. Robert Bryan-Now Available to Watch Online!

Byrd and I: A Northern Evening with Rev. Robert Bryan-Now Available to Watch Online!

October 16, 2014 7:00 PM  – 8:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Rev. Robert Bryan, best known for his "Bert & I" stories, will entertain with tales about his career in Labrador and Quebec and his friendship with polar explorer Richard Byrd.  Rev. Bryan's talk marks the publication of his autobiography by Down East Books, and the donation to the Arctic Museum of a parka made from sealskins given to him by Byrd.

A book signing of Bryan's new memoir, "The Flying Parson and the Real Story Behind Bert and I," will take place after the talk.

Click here to watch the talk.




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Seth Schein: "'War, What is it Good For?' in Homer's Iliad and Four Receptions"

Seth Schein: "'War, What is it Good For?' in Homer's Iliad and Four Receptions"

October 20, 2014 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Seth Schein is Emeritus Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of California, Davis.  A leading scholar of Homer, his lecture will explore not only the topic of war in the Iliad but also the influence of Homer's poetry on twentieth-century poetry and music.  He will touch on artistic responses to war in both antiquity and the present day.  

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Brett Rogers: Tyrannical Teachers and Student-Citizens

Brett Rogers: Tyrannical Teachers and Student-Citizens

October 21, 2014 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Professor Brett Rogers, University of Puget Sound, WA, will be joining the many conversations and debates we are having about the "usefulness" of a liberal arts education with his public lecture, "Tyrannical Teachers and Student-Citizens: Classical Greek Perspectives on Freedom and the Liberal Arts." This talk starts with a curious question that arises in classical Greek tragedy – Why do tyrants talk like teachers? – and explores the social and political implications of ‘teaching’ in fifth century BCE Athens. One significant problem that arises from this exploration is whether students can actually be ‘free’, and thus calls into question some of the premises that underlie not only the foundations for the liberal arts (‘the skills possessed by a free person’) in Plato and Aristotle, but also the notion of freedom for student-citizens even in a liberal arts and democratic context. Support for this event provided by the Jasper Jacob Stahl Lectureship Fund, the Mellon Humanities Initiative--Studies in the Mediterranean, and the Classics Department with additional support from the Education, Government, and Philosophy Departments.

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Book Release Celebration - David Collings "Stolen Future, Broken Present: The Human Significance of Climate Change"

Book Release Celebration - David Collings "Stolen Future, Broken Present: The Human Significance of Climate Change"

October 22, 2014 4:15 PM  – 5:15 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Join us for a discussion and reception celebrating the release of Bowdoin Professor of English David Collings' new book, Stolen Future, Broken Present: The Human Significance of Climate Change, moderated by Collin Roesler, Associate Professor of Earth and Oceanographic Science at Bowdoin.

In Stolen Future, Collings argues that we are virtually out of time to prevent severe, irreversible climate change - with a devastating effect on how we think about the future.

Nearly everything we do, Collings says, is premised on the assumption that the world we know will endure into the future and provide a sustaining context for our activities. But today the future of a viable biosphere, and thus the purpose of our present activities, is put into question. A disappearing future leads to a broken present, a strange incoherence in the feel of everyday life.

We thus face the unprecedented challenge of salvaging a basis for our lives today. That basis may be found in our capacity to assume an infinite responsibility for ecological disaster. By owning disaster and accepting our small place within the inhuman forces of the biosphere, we may discover how to live with responsibility and serenity whatever may come.

David Collings teaches courses in British Romanticism, critical theory, sexuality and gender, and environmental studies. He is the author of Wordsworthian Errancies: The Poetics of Cultural Dismemberment (1994) and Monstrous Society: Reciprocity, Discipline, and the Political Uncanny, c. 1780-1848 (2009), among others.

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Sujata Moorti: "Mothers, Inc.: The Racial Politics of Transnational Surrogacy"

Sujata Moorti: "Mothers, Inc.: The Racial Politics of Transnational Surrogacy"

October 28, 2014 4:00 PM  – 5:30 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Mothers, Inc.: The Racial Politics of Transnational Surrogacy

Sujata Moorti is Professor of Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies at Middlebury College. She has published extensively on media representations of gender, sexuality and diasporic formations. She is currently completing a manuscript on iFeminism where she teases out the ways in which social media are altering understandings of feminism around the world. In this manuscript she explores the transnational circuits of activism and knowledge production that social media technologies engender, altering our conceptions of gender and agency. She is completing two other monographs on gendered violence. She is the author of Color of Rape: Gender, Race and Democratic Public Spheres (SUNY Press, 2002) and has co-edited Global Bollywood: The Travels of Hindi Song and Dance (University of Minnesota Press, 2008) and Local Violence, Global Media: Feminist Analyses of Gendered Representations (Peter Lang, 2009). She teaches courses on feminist cultural studies, diasporic media studies, and postcolonial theory.

Prof. Moorti will examine the visual culture that has emerged around the transnational surrogacy industry located in India. Moving beyond the ethical and moral dilemmas posed by the phenomenon this presentation centers on the rich and dense media culture that has emerged around this phenomenon: reproscape. An analysis of these images helps us understand how the different women involved in the surrogacy industry (e.g., surrogates, agents, egg donors, prospective parents and doctors) are each differently located in discourses of citizenship and equally implicated in transnational labor circuits. Informed by critical race theories and postcolonial feminist scholarship the presentation unpacks the racial politics of this industry.

Sponsored by: Sociology and Anthropology, Asian Studies, Gender and Women's Studies, and the Lectures and Concerts General Fund.

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"Revealing Mediterranean Women": Exhibit Opening and Reception

"Revealing Mediterranean Women": Exhibit Opening and Reception

October 30, 2014 5:00 PM  – 6:30 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Join the Mellon Initiative in Mediterranean Studies for refreshments in the Pavilion to celebrate the opening of the Becker Gallery exhibition, "Revealing Mediterranean Women". 

This exhibition explores and critiques European visions of Mediterranean women in art as powerful, monstrous, seductive, or exotic from Ancient Greece through Picasso. 

Organized with the collaboration of students, museum staff, and the faculty from the Mediterranean Studies Humanities Initiative at Bowdoin College.

Photo:  J.P. Sebah, Dame Copte.  n.d. vintage albumen print.  Gift of Isaac Lagnado, Class of 1971.

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"The Gods of Times Square," with Documentary Filmmaker Richard Sandler

"The Gods of Times Square," with Documentary Filmmaker Richard Sandler

November 3, 2014 7:00 PM  – 9:30 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Cleaveland 151

Filmmaker Richard Sandler shot "The Gods of Times Square" over the course of six years during a radical transformation of the iconic New York City neighborhood. 

Gentrification and the real estate boom squeezed out the mom-and-pop stores, and gone, too, were the colorful characters who made Times Square a "speaker's corner." Only the most strident of religious zealots remained to warn of "eternal sin."

Sandler's film records a time in New York's history when the place most identified with free speech and the soul of New York changed from a democratic, interracial common ground to a corporate-controlled, soulless theme park.

Please join us for a screening of  Sandler's "The Gods of Times Square," followed by a discussion with the filmmaker.

Generously supported by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, the departments of  Visual Arts, Sociology and Anthropology, and Religion, and the Cinema Studies program 

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25 Years Since the Fall of the Berlin Wall: Pop-up Exhibit

25 Years Since the Fall of the Berlin Wall: Pop-up Exhibit

November 4, 2014 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Blue Room

7:00 P.M.
Blue Room, Smith Union

What do you know about the Berlin Wall? Where were you when the Wall fell? Come and share in an exhibit of memorabilia, research, art, and conversation with students, faculty members, and members of the community. Light refreshments will be available.

Free and open to the public.

Sponsored by the Department of German and the German Information Center.

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3rd Digital Computational Studies Initiative Hackathon

3rd Digital Computational Studies Initiative Hackathon

November 12, 2014 5:00 PM  – 11:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Room 304 (North)

Hack much? Well, now you can. Come start work on a project, learn a new coding language, visualize data, or how to protect your online privacy. DCSI students and hackers from Code4Maine will be there!

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Genevieve LeMoine: "Finding Crocker Land: Archaeology at Etah and Beyond"

Genevieve LeMoine: "Finding Crocker Land: Archaeology at Etah and Beyond"

November 13, 2014 7:00 PM  – 8:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

To mark the opening of the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum exhibit, A Glimmer on the Polar Sea: The Crocker Land Expedition, 1913-1917, curator Genevieve LeMoine will discuss her archaeological research at Etah, northwest Greenland. Etah was occupied by Inuit for 1000 years before it became the headquarters of Donald MacMillan's Crocker Land Expedition. Finds ranging from prehistoric ivory harpoon heads to twentieth-century cereal boxes help tell the story of the diverse groups who lived there and influenced one another.


Reception to follow in Hubbard Hall.

Free and open to the public.  Call 725-3416 for information. 

Talk underwritten by the Russell and Janet Doubleday Endowment.  Reception funded by Post Grape-Nuts.

Photo: Aerial view of Etah, Greenland, June 26, 2006. Photograph by John Darwent.


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'Nowhere to Call Home' : Film Screening with Filmmaker Jocelyn Ford

'Nowhere to Call Home' : Film Screening with Filmmaker Jocelyn Ford

November 18, 2014 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Edwards Arts Center, Room 115 [Digital Media Lab]

Nowhere to Call Home: a Tibetan in Beijing provides a rare glimpse into the world of a widowed Tibetan farmer, torn between her traditional way of life and her desire for her son to have a better future in the city. Shot in the slums of Beijing and a remote village near the epicenter of Tibetan self-immolations, this gripping story of a woman determined to beat the odds puts a human face on the political strife that fractures China and Tibet. 


Beijing-based award-winning radio correspondent and filmmaker Jocelyn Ford hosts this screening, along with the following panel discussion. Ford has been a journalist in Asia for three decades and has a passion for stories on under-represented social issues. For over a decade, she was bureau chief for U.S. public radio's premier national business show, Marketplace, first in Tokyo, later in Beijing. In Japan, as the first foreigner in the prime minister's press corps, she persistently challenged unspoken taboos. In 2001, Ford became the first foreigner to co-produce and co-host China Radio International's first live drive-time news show.

The screening will begin at 7:00pm.

This event is sponsored by the departments of Visual Art, Cinema Studies,  and Gender and Women's Studies. 

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'Sleep Dealer': A Screening and Discussion with Filmmaker Alex Rivera

'Sleep Dealer': A Screening and Discussion with Filmmaker Alex Rivera

December 3, 2014 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Filmmaker and Digital Media Artist Alex Rivera visits Bowdoin to screen and discuss his award-winning film, Sleep Dealer

Rivera’s work has been telling new, urgent and visually adventurous Latino stories. His first feature film, Sleep Dealer, a science fiction tale set on the U.S./Mexico border, won multiple awards at the Sundance Film Festival and the Berlin Film Festival. His film was also screened as part of ‘New Directors/New Films’ at the Museum of Modern Art and Lincoln Center and had a commercial release in the U.S., France, and Japan. 

Sleep Dealer tells the story of Memo Cruz (Luis Fernando Peña), a young man in near future Mexico. When is family falls victim to a misguided drone attack he finds himself with no option but to head north, towards the U.S./Mexico border. But migrants can not cross this new world border – it’s been sealed off. Instead, Memo ends up in a strange digital factory in Mexico where he connects his body to a robot in America. 

Sleep Dealer carries embedded in it profound political and economic critiques about issues as diverse as labor and immigration, technology and ethics, globalization, and the environment. 

Sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, Sociology and Anthropology, Romance Languages, Latin American Studies, Cinema Studies, the Office of the Dean of Multicultural Student Affairs, and the McKeen Center for the Common Good.

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'The New Black' : Documentary Screening and Discussion with Yoruba Richen

'The New Black' : Documentary Screening and Discussion with Yoruba Richen

December 8, 2014 6:00 PM  – 8:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Filmmaker Yoruba Richen returns to Bowdoin for a screening and discussion of her new, award-winning documentary The New Black.

Richen has directed and produced films in the United States, Africa, South America, and Southeast Asia. Her award-winning work, Promised Land, was screened at Bowdoin in Spring 2011, and has since screened at numerous festivals around the world. It received a Diverse Voices Co-Production fund award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and won the Fledgling Fund Award for Social Issue Documentary. 

She has produced for the investigative unit of ABC News and the independent news program Democracy Now. In 2007, she won a Fulbright Award in filmmaking and traveled to Salvador, Brazil, where she began production on Sisters of the Good Death, a documentary about the oldest African women’s association in the Americas and the annual festival they hold celebrating the end of slavery. In 2012, Richen won the Tribeca All Access Creative Promise Award and became a Guggenheim fellow. She is a graduate of Brown University and teaches Documentary Film at CUNY’s Graduate School of Journalism. 

Free and open to the public

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