Calendar Archive

Fall 2013

Queer Matter: Science and Sexuality in the Renaissance

Queer Matter: Science and Sexuality in the Renaissance

November 5, 2013 7:30 PM  – 8:15 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

This inaugural lecture in the "Science Before Science" faculty series and course cluster examines early modern alchemy as a science of generation that had profound implications for defining what it meant to be human and for approaching Nature as an object of study.

Presented by Associate Professor of English Aaron Kitch.

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The Religion of Witchcraft: The Spiritual Reality Beyond Oz, Buffy, and Hogwarts

The Religion of Witchcraft: The Spiritual Reality Beyond Oz, Buffy, and Hogwarts

October 28, 2013 7:30 PM  – 10:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

"The Religion of Witchcraft: The Spiritual Reality Beyond Oz, Buffy, and Hogwarts" by Marilyn Pukkila

This lecture on contemporary Wicca will dispel myths about witchcraft today and allow the community to better understand the religion in its full complexity.

This event is free and open to the public.

Sponsored by the Departments of Romance Languages and Religion, Gender and Women's Studies and Lectures and Concerts.

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Galileo, Poetry, and Digital Studies with Crystal Hall

Galileo, Poetry, and Digital Studies with Crystal Hall

October 24, 2013 4:30 PM  – 5:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Crystal Hall, Postdoctoral Fellow with the new Digital and Computational Studies Initiative, explores the challenges and opportunities of digital humanities research through the case study of Galileo Galilei and the ways that the best-selling poetry of his age shaped the expression of his philosophical ideas.

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"Mine Vaganti" Film Showing

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October 16, 2013 9:00 PM  – 11:00 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Italian 2203: Intermediate Italian Film Showing

Mine Vaganti (Loose Cannons) is a 2010 Italian comedy film directed by Ferzan Ozpetek. Loose Cannons was highly praised by film critics: the film premiered on 13 February 2010 at the 60th Berlin International Film Festival, and in the United States, at the Tribeca Film Festival on 28 April 2010, where it won the Special Jury Prize.

It is the story of Tommaso, the youngest son of the Cantones, a large, traditional southern Italian family operating a pasta-making business in Lecce since the 1960s. On a trip home from Rome, where he studies literature and lives with his boyfriend, Tommaso decides to tell his parents the truth about himself. But when he is finally ready to come out in front of the entire family, his older brother Antonio, who has been working at the factory for years, ruins his plans. Tommaso's paternal grandmother, who started the factory, who is known as the loose cannon of the family and who has a long kept secret of her own, may have her own say in what happens in the family.

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Reading Performances of Spanish Golden Age Theatre

Reading Performances of Spanish Golden Age Theatre

September 18, 2013 4:15 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

"Reading" Performances of Spanish Golden Age Theatre (and Shakespeare)

Performance is the "translation" of the work of a playwright to the stage, wherein the text is only one component. The input of director, designers (set, costume, sound, lighting) also creates that performance. The paper will attempt to describe that process of translation, in its many aspects, which may include adaptation of the "original" text according to the needs of performance and the concept of the director. In reading stage performance, I attempt to answer the question posed by Peter Brook, "Why this play now?" so as to understand what the director had in mind (not what one might presume that he or she could or should have had in mind). Examples will be taken from modern productions of Spanish Golden Age theatre by the Compania Nacional de Teatro Clasico; or from productions in English of those plays by the Royal Shakespeare Company; or from La Comedie-Francaise; and even from some productions of Shakespeare -- to illustrate the process of mounting a classical play for a modern audience.

Sponsored by the Departments of Romance Languages, English, and Theater and Dance, with additional funding provided by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Lectureship Fund.

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French Table

French Table

May 8, 2013 5:30 PM  – 7:30 PM
Thorne Hall, Pinette Dining Room

Come and enjoy conversation while strengthening your language skills.

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Italian Coffee Hour

Italian Coffee Hour

May 8, 2013 4:00 PM  – 5:30 PM
Miscellaneous 2

Italian Coffee Hour
Wednesdays 4:00-5:30
106 Riley House
Come join us for espresso, biscotti, and enjoy conversation while strengthening your language skills!

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Spanish Table

Spanish Table

May 2, 2013 5:30 PM  – 7:30 PM
Thorne Hall, Pinette Dining Room

Come and enjoy conversation while strengthening your language skills.

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French Table

French Table

May 1, 2013 5:30 PM  – 7:30 PM
Thorne Hall, Pinette Dining Room

Come and enjoy conversation while strengthening your language skills.

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Italian Coffee Hour

Italian Coffee Hour

May 1, 2013 4:00 PM  – 5:30 PM
Miscellaneous 2

Italian Coffee Hour

Wednesdays, 4:00-5:30
106 Riley House

Come join us for espresso, biscotti, and enjoy conversation while strengthening your language skills!

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French Film Festival Earth Day Screening

French Film Festival Earth Day Screening

April 22, 2013 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Nenette

7:00 P.M.
Kresge Auditorium
Visual Arts Center

Nenette is an enchanting lady in her fortieth year, and the oldest resident of the Menagerie du Jardin des Plantes in Paris. She is also an orangutan. Famed documentarian Nicolas Philibert (To Be and to Have) sensitively captures her engaging personality in this "fascinating study" (San Francisco Chronicle) of life lived behind a zoo's walls.

Born in 1969 in Borneo and brought to France in 1972, Nenette has spent the vast majority of her life in captivity, but it has not been a bore. She has outlived three husbands, borne four children, and baffled zookeepers with her inscrutable mood swings. Philibert fixes his camera on her for the entire running time, revealing both a disdainful diva and a kind, mournful soul. Her enigmatic gaze begs for interpretation, raising serious questions about the morality of caging animals. Even her keepers speculate as to the thoughts percolating behind her aged brow.

NENETTE is an "absorbing, contemplative film" (The Guardian), and essential viewing for animal lovers the world over. It searches for the spirit of an orangutan, and finds it.

Free and open to the public.  Discussion to follow.

Sponsored by the Departments of Romance Languages, Biology and Education, the Film Studies Program, the Counseling Center, the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, and with support from the Bowdoin French Club.

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The Bowdoin French Film Festival

The Bowdoin French Film Festival

February 20, 2013 6:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

TOMBOY


7:00 p.m.
Beam Classroom, Visual Arts Center

A sensitive portrait of childhood just before pubescence, Tomboy, the second film by writer-director Céline Sciamma, astutely explores the freedom of being untethered to the rule-bound world of gender codes. About 20 minutes elapse before we learn the real name and biological sex of Laure, a gangly, short-haired kid about to go into fourth grade. Her family has just moved to a suburban apartment complex a few weeks before the school year starts. The clan’s relocation provides Laure an opportunity for re-invention, introducing herself to her playmates as Michaël —an identity that gives her the liberty to go shirtless and wrestle with the other boys, attracting the attention of crushed-out Lisa. Sciamma shows a real gift for capturing kids at play, filming the August afternoons devoted to soccer and water battles as their own otherworldly time zone. But the director doesn’t present an uncomplicated view of childhood: Laure/ Michaël, beginning to reciprocate Lisa’s smitten feelings, lives in anxiety of being found out as much as she revels in being a boy. Extremely empathic, Tomboy isn’t simply an earnest plea for tolerance: Childhood itself, the film intimates, is full of ambiguities, of sorting out what you are drawn to and what repels you.

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Latin American and Spanish film festival: Lope

Latin American and Spanish film festival: Lope

January 28, 2013 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Join us for the Latin American and Spanish Film Festival. Celebrate the culture and the language and expand your understanding of world cinema!

Every evening from Monday January 28th through Friday, February 1st, 2013, view a new Spanish-language film presented by Bowdoin faculty members from Romance Languages, Music, Anthropology, Latin American Studies, History, and Film Studies.

Kicking off the film festival, Elena Cueto-Asin, Associate Professor and Chair of Romance Languages, presents an epic about the life of a Spanish playwright, novelist, and poet:

LOPE
Though lesser known than his contemporary Miguel de Cervantes, Felix Arturo Lope de Vega y Carpio was a prolific Spanish playwright, novelist, and poet who dominated the theater scene during Spain's Baroque period.

This romantic epic has a stellar cast of renowned Spanish actors including Pedro Almodovar favorite Leonor Watling, Luis Tosar, Antonio de la Torre, Pilar Lopez de Ayala, and Sonia Braga. And Alberto Amman brings tremendous passion to the role of Lope, the incorrigible but endearing Casanova.

This multi-award winning film brings to life the amorous adventurer who was constantly derailed by his passion for women as he struggled to establish himself as a playwright.

(Andrucha Waddington, 106 minutes, Drama/Biopic, 2010, Spanish with English subtitles)

Sponsored by a grant from the Spanish Film Club, the Blythe Bickel Edwards fund, Latin American Studies Program, Bowdoin Film Society, Department of Romance Languages, Latin American Student Organization, Film Studies Program, Department of English, and Department of Music.

The Spanish Film Club series was made possible with the support of Pragda, the Secretary of State for Culture of Spain, and its Program for Cultural Cooperation with United States' Universities.

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2011

 



freedom readersWednesday April 27, 2011: Dante and African American Culture 
7:00 p.m. - Beam Auditorium
 
Dennis Looney, Professor of Italian at the University of Pittsburgh, will lecture on Dante and African American Culture, drawn from his soon to be published book Freedom Readers: The African American Reception of Dante Alighieri and the Divine Comedy (University of Notre Dame Press, Devers Series in Dante Studies, forthcoming 2011).

Sponsored by the Departments of Romance Languages, History and Government and Legal Studies, the Africana Studies Program and Lectures and Concerts. 

Thursday, February 10, 2011: Poetry, Politics and Philosophy in Dante's Purgatorio
4:30 p.m. - Main Lounge, Moulton Union

dante purgPaul Stern, Professor of Politics at Ursinus College, has written extensively on Plato's political philosophy, including two books: Socratic Rationalism and Political Philosophy (SUNY Press, 1993) and Knowledge and Politics in Plato's Theaetetus (Cambridge University Press, 2008).  He is currently working on Dante's political philosophy.

Sponsored by the John C. Donovan Lecture Fund and the Department of Romance Languages.