Location: Bowdoin / Psychology / Courses / Spring 2011

Psychology

Spring 2011

101. Introduction to Psychology
Barbara Held M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
A general introduction to the major concerns of contemporary psychology, including physiological psychology, perception, learning, cognition, language, development, personality, intelligence, and abnormal and social behavior. Recommended for first- and second-year students. Juniors and seniors should enroll in the spring semester.

101. Introduction to Psychology
Samuel Putnam M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
A general introduction to the major concerns of contemporary psychology, including physiological psychology, perception, learning, cognition, language, development, personality, intelligence, and abnormal and social behavior. Recommended for first- and second-year students. Juniors and seniors should enroll in the spring semester.

210. Infant and Child Development
Samuel Putnam M 1:30 - 2:25, W 1:30 - 2:25, F 1:30 - 2:25
A survey of major changes in psychological functioning from conception through childhood. Several theoretical perspectives are used to consider how physical, personality, social, and cognitive changes jointly influence the developing child’s interactions with the environment.

212. Social Psychology
Kimberly Robinson T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
A survey of theory and research on individual social behavior. Topics include self-concept, social cognition, affect, attitudes, social influence, interpersonal relationships, and cultural variations in social behavior.

218. Physiological Psychology
TBD M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
An introductory survey of biological influences on behavior. The primary emphasis is on the physiological regulation of behavior in humans and other vertebrate animals, focusing on genetic, developmental, hormonal, and neuronal mechanisms. Additionally, the evolution of these regulatory systems is considered. Topics discussed include perception, cognition, sleep, eating, sexual and aggressive behaviors, and mental disorders.

251. Research Design in Psychology
Louisa Slowiaczek T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
A systematic study of the scientific method as it underlies psychological research. Topics include prominent methods used in studying human and animal behavior, the logic of causal analysis, experimental and non-experimental designs, issues in internal and external validity, pragmatics of careful research, and technical writing of research reports.

252. Data Analysis
Seth Ramus T 8:30 - 9:55, TH 8:30 - 9:55
An introduction to the use of descriptive and inferential statistics and design in behavioral research. Weekly laboratory work in computerized data analysis. Required of majors no later than the junior year, and preferably by the sophomore year.

259. Abnormal Psychology
Barbara Held M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
A general survey of the nature, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of common patterns of mental disorders. Non-laboratory course credit. Participation in the practicum is optional, contingent upon openings in the program.

260. Abnormal Psychology with Lab
Barbara Held M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
A general survey of the nature, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of common patterns of mental disorders. Laboratory course credit. Students participate in a supervised practicum at a local psychiatric unit.

275. Laboratory in Behavioral Neuroscience: Social Behavior
Richmond Thompson T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
A laboratory course that exposes students to modern techniques in neuroscience that can be applied to the study of social behavior. Underlying concepts associated with various molecular, neuroanatomical, pharmacological, and electrophysiological methods are discussed in a lecture format. Students then use these techniques in laboratory preparations that demonstrate how social behavior is organized within the central nervous system of vertebrate animals, including humans.

278. Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
Desdamona Rios T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
Although much of human experience and culture is manifested through narratives, most quantitative research methods in the social sciences are not sensitive to the nuances, ambiguities, and layers of meaning narratives convey. Qualitative research methods provide practical, systematic, and verifiable means to tap the psychological meaning of narratives, yet they are much less often employed by psychologists, and often poorly understood. Introduces a range of qualitative methods used in the social sciences, particularly psychology. Covers the philosophical underpinnings of qualitative methods, reflexivity and ethics in qualitative research, the conditions and questions for which a qualitative study is most appropriate, evaluation of qualitative research, combining qualitative and quantitative methods, and approaches to writing qualitative reports. Hands-on activities introduce students to qualitative research design, data collection, coding, and analysis. Focuses on the role of narrative in social and personal identity. Many readings will feature the work of feminist scholars, whose pioneering work using qualitative methods has advanced our understanding of methodology and epistemology, while illuminating the significance of gender in the lives of women and men.

303. Health Psychology
Kimberly Robinson T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
Examines the relationships between psychosocial and behavioral factors and physical health. Specific topics include stress and coping, health behavior theory, personality and health, patient/provider relationships, and adjustment to chronic illness. Seminar meetings will involve discussion of theories, empirical findings, and real-world applications.

313. Advanced Seminar in Behavioral Neuroscience
Professor X M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
Focuses on genes and regulatory sequences that contribute to the organization and functioning of neural circuits and molecular pathways in the brain that support social behavior. Topics of interest and discussion will include the functional genomics of neural and behavioral plasticity in cichlid fishes, gene regulation and social behavior in honey bees, learned vocal communication in songbirds, and also epigenetic regulation of gene expression and behavior.

317. The Psychology of Language
Louisa Slowiaczek W 1:00 - 3:55
An examination of psychological factors that affect the processing of language, including a discussion of different modalities (auditory and visual language) and levels of information (sounds, letters, words, sentences, and text/discourse). Emphasis is on the issues addressed by researchers and the theories developed to account for our language abilities.

318. Neuroethology
Lisa Mangiamele T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
Neuroethology is the study of the neural basis of animal behavior. It approaches studying the nervous system by examining the mechanisms that have evolved to solve problems encountered by animals in their natural environment. Topics include behaviors related to orientation and migration, social communication, feeding, and reproduction. Current scientific literature emphasized.

321. Cognitive Development
Suzanne Lovett T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
Examines the development of cognitive understanding and cognitive processes from infancy through adolescence. Emphasis on empirical research and related theories of cognitive development. Topics include infant perception and cognition, concept formation, language development, theory of mind, memory, problem solving, and scientific thinking.