Spring 2015

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PSYC 1101A. Introduction to Psychology.
A general introduction to the major concerns of contemporary psychology, including physiological psychology, perception, learning, cognition, language, development, personality, intelligence, and abnormal and social behavior. Recommended for first- and second-year students. Juniors and seniors should enroll in the spring semester.
PSYC 1101B. Introduction to Psychology.
A general introduction to the major concerns of contemporary psychology, including physiological psychology, perception, learning, cognition, language, development, personality, intelligence, and abnormal and social behavior. Recommended for first- and second-year students. Juniors and seniors should enroll in the spring semester.
PSYC 2010. Infant and Child Development.
A survey of major changes in psychological functioning from conception through childhood. Several theoretical perspectives are used to consider how physical, personality, social, and cognitive changes jointly influence the developing child’s interactions with the environment.
PSYC 2030. Social Psychology.
A survey of theory and research on individual social behavior. Topics include self-concept, social cognition, affect, attitudes, social influence, interpersonal relationships, and cultural variations in social behavior.
PSYC 2040. Cognitive Psychology.
A survey of theory and research examining how humans perceive, process, store, and use information. Topics include visual perception, attention, memory, language processing, decision making, and cognitive development.
PSYC 2050. Physiological Psychology.
An introductory survey of biological influences on behavior. The primary emphasis is on the physiological regulation of behavior in humans and other vertebrate animals, focusing on genetic, developmental, hormonal, and neuronal mechanisms. Additionally, the evolution of these regulatory systems is considered. Topics discussed include perception, cognition, sleep, eating, sexual and aggressive behaviors, and mental disorders.
PSYC 2510. Research Design in Psychology.
A systematic study of the scientific method as it underlies psychological research. Topics include prominent methods used in studying human and animal behavior, the logic of causal analysis, experimental and non-experimental designs, issues in internal and external validity, pragmatics of careful research, and technical writing of research reports.
PSYC 2520. Data Analysis.
An introduction to the use of descriptive and inferential statistics and design in behavioral research. Weekly laboratory work in computerized data analysis. Required of majors no later than the junior year, and preferably by the sophomore year.
PSYC 2710. Research in Developmental Psychology.
The multiple methods used in developmental research are examined both by reading research reports and by designing and conducting original research studies. The methods include observation, interviews, questionnaires, lab experiments, among others. Students learn to evaluate the relative strengths and weaknesses of both qualitative and quantitative approaches.
PSYC 2725. Laboratory in Clinical Psychology.
An overview and analysis of the diverse research methods employed by clinical psychologists. Through reading, analysis, and hands-on experience students gain an understanding of the relative merits of various approaches to understanding the nature and treatment of mental disorders. Major topics include clinical interviewing and assessment, information-processing approaches to understanding psychopathology, and the principles of behavior change. Class participation culminates with the design and conduct of an original research project.
PSYC 2750. Laboratory in Behavioral Neuroscience: Social Behavior.
A laboratory course that exposes students to modern techniques in neuroscience that can be applied to the study of social behavior. Underlying concepts associated with various molecular, neuroanatomical, pharmacological, and electrophysiological methods are discussed in a lecture format. Students then use these techniques in laboratory preparations that demonstrate how social behavior is organized within the central nervous system of vertebrate animals, including humans.
PSYC 3035. Existential Social Psychology.
An examination of how human concerns about death, meaning, isolation, and freedom influence and motivate a wide array of human behavior. Readings and discussions address empirical research on different theories of human motivation (e.g., terror management, meaning maintenance, attachment, compensatory control, and self-determination) that enrich our understanding of topics such as intergroup conflict, religious belief, prosocial behavior, interpersonal relationships, and materialism.
PSYC 3040. The Psychology of Language.
An examination of psychological factors that affect the processing of language, including a discussion of different modalities (auditory and visual language) and levels of information (sounds, letters, words, sentences, and text/discourse). Emphasis is on the issues addressed by researchers and the theories developed to account for our language abilities.
PSYC 3055. Cognitive Neuroscience of Memory.
An advanced discussion of recent empirical and theoretical approaches to understanding the cognitive neuroscience of memory. Readings and discussions address empirical studies using neuroimaging methods. Topics include hippocampal and cortical contributions to memory encoding and retrieval and the effect of genetic variability, drugs, emotions, and sleep on memory.