Location: Bowdoin / Psychology / Courses / Fall 2013

Psychology

Fall 2013

  • Please note that for the 2013-14 academic year, official course numbers are now four digits. This page only shows the older three-digit course numbers. If you need to see both the old and the new numbers, consult the College Catalogue.
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101. Introduction to Psychology
Richmond Thompson T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
A general introduction to the major concerns of contemporary psychology, including physiological psychology, perception, learning, cognition, language, development, personality, intelligence, and abnormal and social behavior. Recommended for first- and second-year students. Juniors and seniors should enroll in the spring semester.

101. Introduction to Psychology
Samuel Putnam M 1:30 - 2:25, W 1:30 - 2:25, F 1:30 - 2:25
A general introduction to the major concerns of contemporary psychology, including physiological psychology, perception, learning, cognition, language, development, personality, intelligence, and abnormal and social behavior. Recommended for first- and second-year students. Juniors and seniors should enroll in the spring semester.

210. Infant and Child Development
Katherine O'Doherty M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
A survey of major changes in psychological functioning from conception through childhood. Several theoretical perspectives are used to consider how physical, personality, social, and cognitive changes jointly influence the developing child’s interactions with the environment.

211. Personality
Barbara Held M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
A comparative survey of theoretical and empirical attempts to explain personality and its development. The relationships of psychoanalytic, interpersonal, humanistic, and behavioral approaches to current research are considered.

216. Cognitive Psychology
Louisa Slowiaczek M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
A survey of theory and research examining how humans perceive, process, store, and use information. Topics include visual perception, attention, memory, language processing, decision making, and cognitive development.

222. Educational Psychology
Kathryn Byrnes T 6:30 - 9:25
Examines theories of how people learn and the implications of those theories for the education of students, particularly those who have been traditionally underserved in the United States. Course concepts will be grounded in empirical research and authentic activities geared towards understanding the nuances and complexities of perspectives on behavior, cognition, development, motivation, sociocultural identities and pedagogy in PK-12 educational contexts. Insights for the ways educators can structure learning experiences to better serve students’ needs from a variety of backgrounds will be cultivated through a field placement working with students.

251. Research Design in Psychology
Paul Schaffner M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
A systematic study of the scientific method as it underlies psychological research. Topics include prominent methods used in studying human and animal behavior, the logic of causal analysis, experimental and non-experimental designs, issues in internal and external validity, pragmatics of careful research, and technical writing of research reports.

252. Data Analysis
Suzanne Lovett M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
An introduction to the use of descriptive and inferential statistics and design in behavioral research. Weekly laboratory work in computerized data analysis. Required of majors no later than the junior year, and preferably by the sophomore year.

270. Laboratory in Cognition
Louisa Slowiaczek M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
An analysis of research methodology and experimental investigations in cognition, including such topics as auditory and sensory memory, visual perception, attention and automaticity, retrieval from working memory, implicit and explicit memory, metamemory, concept formation and reasoning. Weekly laboratory sessions allow students to collect and analyze data in a number of different areas of cognitive psychology.

274. Laboratory in Group Dynamics
Paul Schaffner T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
Principles and methods of psychological research, as developed in Psychology 2510 {251} and 2520 {252}, are applied to the study of small group interaction. Students design, conduct, and report on social behavior research involving an array of methods to shape and assess interpersonal behavior.

280. Laboratory in Cognitive Neuroscience
Erika Nyhus T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
A laboratory course that exposes students to multiple techniques in cognitive neuroscience that can be applied to the study of human cognition. Introduces human neuroimaging methods including electroencephlography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Students will then use these methods to study aspects of human cognition including perception, attention, memory, language, problem solving, reasoning, and decision making.

309. Psychotherapy, Psychology, and Philosophy
Barbara Held M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
Many clinical psychologists are returning to psychology’s roots in philosophy for guidance on how to best understand the nature and purposes of psychotherapy. Considers the clinical, scientific, and underlying philosophical issues that pertain to different systems of psychotherapy. In exploring different approaches to psychotherapy, particular attention is given to such questions as the nature of personhood and the self, methods of obtaining self-knowledge and warrant for claims about self-knowledge, whether humans have free will, the nature of therapeutic change, and the nature of human happiness or well being. Current debates about a proper science of psychotherapy are emphasized.

316. Comparative Neuroanatomy
Richmond Thompson W 10:00 - 11:25, F 10:00 - 11:25
An advanced discussion of concepts in vertebrate brain organization. The primary emphasis is upon structure/function relationships within the brain, particularly as they relate to behavior. Topics include basic neuroanatomy, brain development and evolution, and the neural circuitry associated with complex behavioral organization. Studies from a variety of animal models and from human neuropsychological assessments are used to demonstrate general principles of brain evolution and function.

320. Social Development
Samuel Putnam M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
Research and theory regarding the interacting influences of biology and the environment as they are related to social and emotional development during infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Normative and idiographic development in a number of domains, including morality, aggression, personality, sex roles, peer interaction, and familial relationships are considered.