Fall 2012 Calendar

Marriage Equality: A Panel Discussion on Gay Marriage and Referendum Question 1 in Maine

Marriage Equality: A Panel Discussion on Gay Marriage and Referendum Question 1 in Maine

October 30, 20127:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

The Maine Same-Sex Marriage Question will appear on the November 6, 2012 ballot in the state of Maine as an indirect initiated state statute. The measure would overturn a voter-approved 2009 ballot measure that banned same-sex marriage in the state. That 2009 measure banned a legislatively approved law that allowed same sex marriage.

Please join us for a moderated panel discussion with a question and answer session following.

Tuesday, October 30, 2012
7:30 p.m.
Kresge Auditorium,
Visual Arts Center

Panelists:
David Collings (Professor of English and Director of Gay & Lesbian Studies)
Elizabeth Pritchard (Associate Professor of Religion)
Scott Sehon  (Professor of Philosophy)
Moderator: Lawrence Simon (Associate Professor of Philosophy)

 Open to the public free of charge
Sponsored by the Department of Philosophy, the Gender and Women's Studies Program, the Gay & Lesbian Studies Program, and the Department of Religion.

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Sanjeev Kulkarni on Machine Learning and Democracy: Some Problems in Collective Decision-Making

Sanjeev Kulkarni on Machine Learning and Democracy: Some Problems in Collective Decision-Making

April 4, 20134:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

The Classics Department presents:

Sanjeev Kulkarni
Professor of Electrical Engineering 
Director of the Keller Center for Technology and Society
Princeton University
"Machine Learning and Democracy: Some Problems in Collective Decision-Making"
A recent area of interest in machine learning involves drawing inferences from a large number of agents, each with some partial information.  These problems in collective decision-making are closely related to a fundamental problem of democracy--that of inferring the collective will of the people.  This talk will give a brief overview of machine learning and voting theory, followed by a discussion of some of our recent work in these areas.
Underwritten by: the Charles F. Adams Lectureship Fund, the Jasper Jacob Stahl lectureship fund.  Co-sponsored by the Classics Department and Computer Science with additional support from the Government Department and Computational Studies.

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