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Environmental Studies 1101 Field Trip Offers Students an Interdisciplinary Approach to Ecological Restoration

John Lichter, a professor of biology and environmental studies, explained that the field trip reflects the course’s intention — indeed, the intention of the whole Environmental Studies department: “The overall message is to understand how humans impact the ecosystem,” he said.

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Student Life
Anu Asaolu ’19: A Student's Journey from Nigeria to Bowdoin

In local writer David Treadwell's essay about Anu Asaolu, he writes: "Some people give you hope for humanity, a cause to celebrate, a reason to smile. Meet Bowdoin College junior Anu Asaolu."

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Discussion and Book Signing: Author Jane Mayer and Columnist Bill Nemitz

September 23, 20174:00 PM – 6:30 PM
Memorial Hall, Pickard Theater

Jane Mayer, author of Dark Money: The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right (2016) and a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1995, will be presented with the 2017 Frances Perkins Center Intelligence & Courage Award September 23, 2017, at 4:00 p.m. in Pickard Theater, Memorial Hall. (Note: New location. With move from Kresge to Pickard, more seating is available. See below for additional ticket information.)

Dark Money is an electrifying work of investigative journalism that uncovers the powerful group of immensely wealthy ideologues who are shaping the fate of America. Mayer is also the author of The Dark Side: The Inside Story of How the War on Terror Turned Into a War on American Ideals (2008). 

Following the award presentation, Mayer will be interviewed about her recent work by Portland Press Herald and Maine Sunday Telegram columnist Bill Nemitz, who began writing his thrice-weekly column for the newspapers in 1995. He is a past president of the Maine Press Association and teaches journalism part-time at St. Joseph's College of Maine in Standish. The Frances Perkins Center honored him in 2015 for his intelligence and courage in elucidating the complexities of Maine's sometimes difficult political environment, confronting its contradictions with humor and wisdom, and keeping his focus on policies, not personalities.

The Betta Ehrenfeld Public Policy Forum is an annual event hosted by the Frances Perkins Center to highlight the principles that guided the life and work of Frances Perkins and apply those principles to today's economic and social problems. The Center was incorporated in Newcastle, Maine, in 2009 to honor its namesake and to fulfill her legacy by continuing her work for social justice and economic security and preserving for future generations her nationally significant family homestead. The Center inspires people to address current economic and social problems as Perkins would, through work in the areas of education, outreach, and advocacy. It is nonprofit, nonpartisan, and currently headquartered in downtown Damariscotta, Maine, where it offers an interpretive exhibit on the life and achievements of Frances Perkins. 

This event is also sponsored by the Department of Government and Legal Studies at Bowdoin College and the John C. Donovan Lecture Fund. 

Donovan, active in Maine Democratic politics, was an administrative assistant to Senator Edmund Muskie and executive assistant to Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz in the Kennedy Administration, and the first full-time manpower administrator for the US Department of Labor.  He was Bowdoin's DeAlva Stanwood Alexander Professor of Government - teaching courses in American politics and Congress from 1965 to 1984 - and the author of the classic work The Politics of Poverty.
  • The event is free and open to the public but tickets are required, and seating is limited.  A book-signing will follow the interview.
  • Tickets may be obtained in person at the Frances Perkins Center, 170A Main St., Damariscotta ME 04543, by calling 207-563-3374, or e-mailing Chris Cash at ccash@francesperkinscenter.org 
  • Tickets may also be obtained in person at Bowdoin College at the Smith Union Information Desk, beginning September 18, 2017.  Note: Tickets marked for Kresge will be honored at the door.
Contact information:

At the Perkins Center: Chris Cash, 170A Main Street, Damariscotta, ME 207-563-3374  www.FrancesPerkinsCenter.org                        
 
At Bowdoin College:   Janet M. Martin, professor of government, 207-725-3618 

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Exhibition Tour and Reception: "Constructing Revolution"

September 23, 20175:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Kristina Toland, guest curator of Constructing Revolution: Soviet Propaganda Posters from between the World Wars leads a tour of the new exhibition, which will be followed by a reception at the Museum of Art.

Free and open to the public.

Image:  Did You Volunteer?, 1920 Lithograph by Dmitry Moor. Collection of Svetlana and Eric Silverman.

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Ensemble Performance: Grdina-Houle-Loewen

September 23, 20177:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Studzinski Recital Hall, Kanbar Auditorium

Since 2014, the collective Grdina-Houle-Loewen has forged a new stream of complex compositions that meld together density, ferocious energy and technical virtuosity. The group's versatility and wide dynamic range has become finely honed, creating an ensemble that can change course dramatically. 

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Page Herrlinger: "A Revolution in Images: Poster Art and the Socialist Imagination in Early Soviet Russia"

September 24, 20172:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Page Herrlinger, associate professor of history, Bowdoin College, delivers the opening lecture for Constructing Revolution: Soviet Propaganda Posters from between the World Wars.

Presented by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art. Free and open to the public.

Image: Let's Repay Our Country's Coal Debt, 1930, litrhograph, by Gustav Kllustis. Collection of Svetlana and Eric Silverman.

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Politics Below the Asphalt: Black Women and the Struggle for Land in Brazil, a lecture by Keisha-Kahn Perry

September 25, 20174:15 PM – 6:45 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

"Politics Below the Asphalt: Black Women and the Struggle for Land in Brazil"

Keisha-Khan Y. Perry is Associate Professor of Africana Studies at Brown University and specializes in the critical study of race, gender, and politics in the Americas with a particular focus on black women's activism, urban geography and questions of citizenship, feminist theories, intellectual history and disciplinary formations, and the interrelationship between scholarship, pedagogy, and political engagement. She has conducted extensive research in Mexico, Jamaica, Belize, Brazil, Argentina, and the United States. Perry's book Black Women against the Land Grab: The Fight for Racial Justice in Brazil is an ethnographic study of black women's activism in Brazilian cities. It examines their participation and leadership in neighborhood associations and how and in what ways their interpretations of racial and gender identities intersect with urban spaces.

Sponsored by: Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies, Latin American Studies, Sociology and Anthropology, Africana Studies, and the Mellon-Mays Program.

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Live Performance - Deke Weaver: BEAR And the Unreliable Bestiary

September 25, 20177:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Playwright/media-artist Deke Weaver's life-long project, The Unreliable Bestiary, is presents an enormous site-specific performance for every letter of the alphabet, each letter represented by an endangered animal or habitat. 


With unlikely stories from our precarious moment in natural history, this solo event features cinematic documentation & live excerpts from The Bestiary's first four performances: MONKEY, ELEPHANT, WOLF, and BEAR.

This event is sponsored by the Departments of Visual Arts and Theater & Dance and is free and open to the public.

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Thomas Laqueur: "What is the Work of the Dead?"

September 27, 20174:30 PM – 6:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Diogenes the Cynic, the dog philosopher, told his disciples that he wanted his dead body thrown over the walls of the city. They objected that he would be eaten by beasts and picked at by birds. "True," he said, and agreed to be left unburied with a stick in his hands to keep away predators. "But you will be dead and won't know that they are molesting your corpse," they replied. "True," he said, "and that is why it makes no difference what happens to my body." 

Over the millennia many people have thought that Diogenes had a point but no culture has ever acted on his argument. Antigone's voice is the one we - or in any case we humans when we are not trying to dehumanize others - hear. Care for the dead is among the "unwavering, unwritten customs of the gods...not some trifle of now or yesterday, but for all eternity." In this talk, Thomas Laqueur explores why Antigone is right, and what work the unfeeling dead body does for the living.

Laqueur is the Fawcett Distinguished Professor of History at University of California, Berkeley. He specializes in the cultural history of the body, and in the history of humanitarianism and of popular religion and literacy. His books include Work of the Dead; Solitary Sex; Making Sex; Religion and Respectability; and, in progress, a short history of humanitarianism and a book about dogs in Western art. He writes for the London Review of Books and was a founding editor of the journal Representations. He received a Mellon Foundation Distinguished Achievement Award, which he used to commission and write a libretto for an opera based on Jose Saramago's novel Death with Interruptions; as well as to support projects on human rights, religion, and science studies. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the American Philosophical Society.

Reception to follow at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

Free and open to the public.

Sponsored by the Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholars Program, Phi Beta Kappa Alpha of Maine, the Departments of Art History, English, History, and Romance Languages and Literatures, and the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

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Reception: Thomas Laqueur and 'The Ivory Mirror'

September 27, 20175:30 PM – 6:30 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

A reception in the Museum of Art honoring Professor Thomas Laqueur and the exhibition The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe . Thomas Laqueur delivers the lecture "What is the Work of the Dead" at 4:30 in Kresge Auditorium, Visual Arts Center.

Free and open to the public.

Image:  Visitors enjoy The Ivory Mirror in the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

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Professor Paula Schlax, Bates College - "RNA decay in Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease"

September 28, 20174:00 PM – 5:15 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Paula Schlax is a Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Bates College. Ongoing work in her laboratory is aimed at understanding the role of RNA turnover in gene regulation in the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. There are an estimated 300,000 cases of Lyme disease in the United States each year. Lyme disease, which causes flu-like symptoms, rashes, headaches and fatigue during early infection and neurological, arthritic and even cardiac complications in late infection, is a significant public health threat in Maine. 

The bacteria that cause this disease can live in ticks and in mammals. The bacteria require different proteins to be expressed in mammals (mice and humans) and in ticks, and the process of shifting from between cold-blooded ticks and warm-blooded mammals results in dramatic changes in the expression of genes in the bacteria. Dr. Schlax will discuss her work that indicates that RNA turnover of of many transcripts is slow and regulated by environmental conditions that mimic difference in ticks and mammalian hosts. 

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George Keyes: "Why Collect? An Introduction to Collecting Old Master Drawings and Prints"

September 28, 20176:30 PM – 8:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

George Keyes, former chief curator at the Detroit Institute of Arts, leads a workshop about the strategies and pleasures of collecting works of art on paper.

Free and open to the public. Due to limited seating, free tickets are required. Phone 207-725-3276 or e-mail cbaljon@bowdoin.edu.


Presented by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art. 

Image:  Copy from Donatello's "Miracle of the Miser's Heart," ca. 1505-20, pen and brown ink, by Workshop of Raphael, Italian, 1483-1520. Bequest of the Honorable James Bowdoin III.  Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

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Jamie Rankin: "So Many Words to Learn: Integrating Research and Classroom Strategies for L2 Vocabulary Acquisition"

September 29, 20173:00 PM – 4:30 PM
Sills Hall, 109 (Woodruff)

Second language (L2) classrooms have undergone radical changes during the past fifty years. They have focused on formal linguistic structures, then on drills and "habit formation," on input and "affective filters" as opposed to a "focus on form," on cultural input, sociocultural perspectives and social networking. Throughout all of these shifts of perspectives and approaches there has been surprisingly little emphasis on one aspect of L2 learning that all teachers and all students acknowledge as a critical factor in L2 communicative proficiency: vocabulary. 

In this talk, Jamie Rankin shifts our perspective, arguing that a knowledge of vocabulary is as critical to interpreting texts as it is to interaction and presentation - that is to say, it lies at the heart of all three categories of L2 proficiency as currently conceptualized.  

Rankin directs the language program in the German department of Princeton University. He has published articles in Unterrichtspraxis and the Modern Language Journal, focusing on the dynamics of corrective feedback in the classroom; training and mentoring graduate student teaching assistants; and assessing the usefulness of classroom materials for beginning and intermediate language learners. He is the co-author of Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (Cengage, now in its sixth edition) and has developed a first-year curriculum for beginning German that integrates culture, grammar, and high-frequency vocabulary using an interactive online platform. In 2014 he was appointed as inaugural director of the new Princeton Center for Language Study.

This hour-long program, including ample time for Q&A, will be followed by a reception.

Open to the public and free of charge.

The seminar is sponsored by the following Departments and Programs: German, Classics, Russian, Romance Languages and Literatures, Education, Center for Learning and Teaching and the Office of Student Fellowships.

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KLAVIERFEST! Master Class and Talk by Pianist Marvin Blickenstaff

September 30, 20174:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Studzinski Recital Hall, Kanbar Auditorium

Join pianist Marvin Blickenstaff for two shows entitled, 'The Many Faces of Music'.  

Blickenstaff has directed the Program for Excellence in Piano Study (PEPS) at the New School for Music Study since 1999. He holds degrees from the Oberlin Conservatory of Music and Indiana University, where he received both academic and performance honors. He is well-known across the country and Canada for his frequent presentations at state and national conferences.

NOTE: The public is invited to attend all KLAVIERFEST! events.

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KLAVIERFEST! Richard Dowling "Great Scott!"

September 30, 20177:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Studzinski Recital Hall, Kanbar Auditorium

Richard Dowling's Great Scott! piano concert features the beloved Scott Joplin ragtime piano works used in the 1973 Academy-Award-winning movie The Sting, (including The Entertainer) plus many other dazzling, delightful, and rarely-heard Joplin compositions.


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KLAVIERFEST! Jeffers Engelhardt

October 1, 20172:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Studzinski Recital Hall, Kanbar Auditorium

"Thinking Creatively about the Piano and its Sound"

NOTE: The public is invited to attend all KLAVIERFEST! events.

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KLAVIERFEST! Diane Walsh, Piano

October 1, 20174:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Studzinski Recital Hall, Kanbar Auditorium

Diane Walsh was associate professor at New York City's Mannes College of Music for 32 years and, in the Fall of 2015, served as Visiting Artist at Colby College.  A Steinway Artist now living in Portland, she will perform works by Bach, Mozart, Bartok and Schumann.

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Gallery Conversation - Alyssa Gillespie: "Soviet Posters between the World Wars"

October 3, 201712:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Alyssa Gillespie, associate professor of Russian, discusses a selection of Soviet posters from between the World Wars.

Presented by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art in conjunction with the exhibition Constructing Revolution: Soviet Propaganda Posters from between the World Wars.

Free and open to the public.

Photo: 1905 Road to October, 1929, by Valentina Kulagina.  Collection of Svetlana and Eric Silverman.

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Panel Discussion: "Cognitive Dissonance and Support for Tyranny: Perspectives from Classical Greece"

October 3, 20175:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Hubbard Hall, Thomas F. Shannon Room [208]

Panelists:
David Teegarden, Associate Professor of Classics at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York
Rob Sobak, Associate Professor of Classics at Bowdoin College

How do politically active and powerful individuals and groups come to support a regime of one-man-rule, which is established and run contrary to their own interests and ideological commitments? Why do political communities seem to fall prey so easily to lies and misdirection, and thus allow the seizure of political power by strongmen? This panel will discuss the tactical and strategic use of deception by the Athenian tyrant Peisistratos, and the accompanying self-deception among Athenian political elites, to explore how both manifest and tacit political support for his tyranny developed amidst a community seemingly ill-disposed to tyrannical rule.

Sponsored by the Classics Department, with support from the History and Government Departments, the Mellon Initiative in Mediterranean Studies, and the Jasper Jacob Stahl Lectureship.

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Alisha Rankin: "A Kingly Medicine: Poison Trials and Exotic Drugs in Early Modern Europe"

October 4, 20174:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Hubbard Hall, Thomas F. Shannon Room [208]

Poison trials, in which a test subject - animal or human - took poison followed by an antidote, were often used as evidence of a drug's efficacy in sixteenth-century Europe. Many poison trials took place at the courts of Europe, at the behest of a powerful prince, who granted his physicians condemned criminals to use for the purpose of drug testing. Although physicians often portrayed these trials as careful experiments, the vast majority of poison trials tested exotic wonder drugs, particularly bezoar stone. 

In this talk, Alisha Rankin will discuss the influence of the global drug trade on the outcome of poison trials, and compare the relatively modest use of poison trials as evidence in the writings of physicians such as Nicolas Monardes and Garcia da Orta with their more extravagant endorsement by European court physicians.

Rankin is associate professor of history at Tufts University.

Free and open to the public.

Sponsored by the departments of Romance Languages and Literatures and History and the Mellon Enhancing the Humanities Initiative. 

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Sharon Louden: "The Artist as Culture Producer: Living and Sustaining a Creative Life"

October 4, 20174:30 PM – 6:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Artist and educator, Sharon Louden will discuss her new edited volume, The Artist as Culture Producer: Living and Sustaining a Creative Life. A compilation of essays by forty visual artists, the book describes how artists extend their practices outside of their studios, becoming change agents in their communities. Their first-hand stories reveal how contemporary artists of the twenty-first century can add to creative economies through innovative activities, making intellectual and aesthetic contributions that benefit education, the non-profit sector, and corporate environments.

Presented by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.  Free and open to the public.


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Film: 'Dangerous Liaisons' - Part of the Bowdoin Book Lecture Series

October 4, 20177:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

The Marquise de Merteuil (Glenn Close) and the Vicomte de Valmont (John Malkovich) display the petty jealousies and jaded insouciance of life in France's royal court in the 18th century, casually ruining the lives of de Merteuil's young romantic rival (Uma Thurman), the music teacher (Keanu Reeves) for whom she secretly pines and the upstanding Madame de Tourvel (Michelle Pfeiffer). But when actual romantic feelings begin to surface, their games take on a more treacherous air.

Join us for this 1988 rendition of the classic novel by Pierre-Ambrose Choderlos de Laclos in advance of discussion of the book on October 5. The movie will be introduced by David Collings, who will deliver the book lecture.
 

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Community Lecture Series - Andrew Rudalevige: "Echoes of Watergate in Today's Washington"

October 5, 201712:30 PM – 1:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge


A talk by Andrew Rudalevige, Thomas Brackett Reed Professor of Government.

Watergate has been frequently in the news this year, as contemporary events seem to mirror those of forty-five years ago. From the "smoking gun" to the "Saturday Night Massacre" and perhaps to presidential pardons and beyond, this talk will remind people what Watergate itself entailed and track its relevance for today's political scene.

Lectures take place from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m., and include time for questions from the audience. Arrive at noon with a bag lunch. Beverages and cookies provided. 


Lectures are free and open to the public. Sponsored by the Association of Bowdoin Friends. Call 725-3306 if you have any questions.





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Panel Discussion with Mirko Canevaro and David Lewis: "Chattel Slavery and Support for Democracy: Perspectives from Classical Greece"

October 5, 20175:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Hubbard Hall, Thomas F. Shannon Room [208]

Panelists:
Mirko Canevaro, Reader in Greek History at the University of Edinburgh
David Lewis,  Assistant Professor of Ancient History at the University of Nottingham
 
Classical Athens was not only the world's first democracy, but it was one of the world's first slave societies. Was Athenian democracy made possible only through the labor of human beings bought and sold as chattel? Was the very notion of democratic citizenship in Athens bound inextricably to the unfree status of people owned by individuals, corporations, and even the state itself? This panel will explore the connections among democratic institutions, democratic ideology and the brute facts of a society that depended on the enslaved lives of thousands of men, women, and children.

Sponsored by the Classics Department, with support from the History Departments, the Mellon Initiative in Mediterranean Studies, and the Jasper Jacob Stahl Lectureship.



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Bowdoin Book Lecture Series - David Collings: "Between Seduction and Love: On Laclos's 'Dangerous Liaisons'"

October 5, 20177:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Sponsored by the Association of Bowdoin Friends. Pierre Choderlos de Laclos's classic novel Dangerous Liaisons is well known for depicting the scandalous lives of those who are skilled at seducing (and abandoning) others. But at its core, this novel considers more difficult questions: Can one who defies love remain immune to it?  Can a seducer be seduced precisely by what he or she refuses? What is ultimately more courageous: to stick with one's decision to become a seducer, or to abandon that intention and embrace love?

David Collings, professor of English, will explore those questions in his lecture "Between Seduction and Love: On Laclos's Dangerous Liaisons".

 
A film showing of Dangerous Liaisons will precede the talk on Wednesday, October 4 at 7:00 p.m., Beam Classroom, Visual Arts Center. Join us for both the film and the talk to kick off this semester's Bowdoin Book Lecture Series!



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Jonathan Katz: "Queer Embodiment and AIDS"

October 11, 20174:30 PM – 6:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Jonathan David Katz is an American activist, educator, art historian and writer. A leading scholar of the intersection of art history and queer studies, he is the current director of the doctoral program in visual culture studies at State University of New York at Buffalo and has made scholarly contributions to queer studies the focus of his professional career. In this talk, he will share his perspective on the embodiment of queerness in art of the past of century.

Also a prolific community organizer, writer, and curator, he co-curated Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture - the first major museum exploration of the impact of same-sex desire in the creation of modern American portraiture - at the Smithsonian Institution's National Portrait Gallery, and is co-curator of Art AIDS America, organized by the Tacoma Art Museum. 

Katz is the founder of the Harvey Milk Institute, the largest queer studies institute in the world, and the author of the forthcoming book, The Homosexualization of American Art: Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg and the Collective Closet.

Free and open to the public. Presented by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

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Community Lecture Series - Michael Kolster: Take Me to the River: Photographs of Atlantic Rivers", The Book and Beyond

November 2, 201712:30 PM – 1:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

"Take Me to the River: Photographs of Atlantic Rivers, The Book and Beyond," a talk by Michael Kolster, associate professor of art and the director of the visual arts division in the department of art.

Kolster will talk about the evolution of his recently-published book project Take Me the River, which depicts four Atlantic rivers.  He will explain some of the reasons he used a photographic process from the 1850s, the wet-plate collodion, to make the photographs.  He will also discuss how Take Me to the River inspired a subsequent project photographing plastic on the beaches of the big island of Hawaii.

Lectures take place from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m., and include time for questions from the audience. Arrive at noon with a bag lunch. Beverages and cookies provided. 


Sponsored by the Association of Bowdoin Friends. Call 725-3306 if you have any questions.



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