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Bowdoin's Lavigne Named Frontiers of Science Fellow

"This kind of collaboration can shed different perspectives on scientific problems, which might lead to new ideas and approaches that wouldn’t necessarily have been thought of at a traditional conference."

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Student Life
Bowdoin Student Techies Go West for Spring Break

Forty Bowdoin students — from across class years, majors, and backgrounds — trekked to California over spring break to explore career opportunities in technology. Now in its second year, the West Trek, a Bowdoin Career Planning program, was expanded this year to allow twice as many students to participate.

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Featured Events

Bowdoin Breakfast with Charlotte Carnevale Willner '06 and David Willner '06: The Value of Liberal Arts in the Tech World

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March 28, 2017 7:00 AM  – 9:00 AM
Thorne Hall, Thorne Dining Room

The Value of the Liberal Arts in Silicon Valley Tech

Join us for the spring Bowdoin Breakfast featuring Charlotte Carnevale Willner '06, Safety Manager at Pinterest, and David Willner '06, Head of Community Policy at Airbnb.  After taking jobs at Facebook fresh out of Bowdoin they learned how their education informed their work in safety and policy in the early days of social media. After ten important years in the San Francisco Bay Area, they offer a unique window into the tech world of Silicon Valley.   

Program
7:15am - Full buffet breakfast
8:00am - Panel begins
9:00am - Program ends

Cost
$15 for the general public
$6 for Bowdoin faculty, staff, and students

Registration
To register securely by credit card, please click here.

To register by check, please mail a registration form and check payable to Bowdoin College to:
Sue Lindsey, Office of Stewardship Programs
4100 College Station, Brunswick, ME 04011.

Bowdoin employees may provide their department project code, and students may provide their ID numbers for payment.

For more information, please visit
http://www.bowdoin.edu/bowdoin-breakfast/ or contact Sue Lindsey in the Office of Stewardship Programs at slindsey@bowdoin.edu or call 207-725-3928.




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Deepak Singh: "Working With An Accent in the United States: An Immigrant's Musings"

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March 28, 2017 4:15 PM  – 5:30 PM
Searles Science Building, 315

Immigrants who come to the United States with foreign degrees and work experience often struggle to find work that matches their education and qualifications. It can knock their careers off track for years.

Deepak Singh grew up in northern India. He earned a bachelor's degree in commerce, an MBA, and a job with the BBC World Service. His new book, How May I Help You?: An Immigrant's Journey from MBA to Minimum Wage, describes his new life after moving to small-town Virginia, where he worked at a minimum wage job in an electronics store. 

In his talk, Deepak will read from his book and discuss his work experience, his relationships with his colleagues and customers, and what that job taught him about American norms.

Books will be available for purchase and signing by the author.

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Kendall Brown: "Japanese Prints Renewed: The Agents and Tangents of Sosaku Hanga"

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March 28, 2017 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Kendall Brown, professor of Asian art history at California State University-Long Beach, explores the post-war flourishing of the Sosaku Hanga or "creative print" movement in Japan through its American patrons and scholars and its emphasis on the materiality of woodblock prints.

Presented in conjunction with the installation of
Sosaku Hanga at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.


Photo: Kendall Brown

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Kenneth V. Santagata Memorial Lecture Presents An Evening with Oskar Eustis

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March 28, 2017 7:30 PM  – 8:30 PM
Memorial Hall, Pickard Theater

Oskar Eustis has served as the artistic director of The Public Theater in New York City since 2005. He came to The Public from Trinity Repertory Company in Providence, Rhode Island, where he served as artistic director from 1994 to 2005.  He served as associate artistic director at Los Angeles's Mark Taper Forum from 1989-1994; and prior to that he was with the Eureka Theatre Company in San Francisco, serving as resident director and dramaturg from 1981-1986 and artistic director from 1986-1989.  Eustis is currently a professor of dramatic writing and arts and public policy at New York University.

Throughout his career, Eustis has been dedicated to the development of new plays as a director, dramaturg and producer.  At The Public, he directed the New York premieres of Rinne Groff's Compulsion and The Ruby Sunrise; and Larry Wright's The Human Scale. At Trinity Rep, he directed the world premiere of Paula Vogel's The Long Christmas Ride Home and Tony Kushner's Homebody/Kabul, both recipients of the Elliot Norton Award for Outstanding Production. While at the Eureka Theatre, he commissioned Tony Kushner's Angels in America, and directed its world premiere at the Mark Taper Forum.

Free and open to the public.
Sponsored by the Kenneth V. Santagata Memorial Fund

  This event will be streamed live.



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Kibbe Science Lecture - Dr. Gabriela Gonzalez: "Einstein, Gravitational Waves, and Black Holes"

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March 29, 2017 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

More than hundred years ago, Einstein predicted that space time was dynamic, and there were ripples in space time traveling at the speed of light, or gravitational waves. On September 14, 2015, the two Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO)  detectors in Hanford, Washington, and Livingston, Louisiana, registered, for the first time ever, a loud gravitational wave signal traveling through Earth, created more than a billion years ago from the merger of two black holes. A few months later in December, another signal, also from black holes, was  detected. These observations marked the beginning of gravitational wave astronomy. Dr. Gabriela Gonzalez will describe the exciting details of the observation, the status of gravitational wave detectors, and the gravity-bright future of the field.


Dr. Gabriela Gonzalez is an experimental physicist who has successfully led the LIGO Scientific Collaboration for the past five years. Gonzalez was born and raised in Cordoba, Argentina and studied physics at the University of Cordoba, where she earned a Master of Science degree. She came to the US to pursue and attain her PhD from Syracuse University. Her doctorate focused on Brownian motion and gravitational waves, work that took her to universities across the US including MIT, Penn State, and LSU. She is currently a professor of physics and astronomy at Louisiana State University and was recently named one of the top ten scientists in the world by the scientific journal Nature.

Sponsored by the Kibbe Science Lecture Fund.

Free and open to the public.

  This event will be streamed live.










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'On Black Struggle: Love, Loss, Freedom' Roundtable with Maurice Wallace

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March 30, 2017 4:15 PM  – 5:30 PM
Thorne Hall, Daggett Lounge

What is the meaning of "black struggle" in the past and present political vocabulary?  As a politics and rhetoric, what is "black struggle" good for today?    Against the backdrop of speeches and writings by Martin Luther King Jr. and James Baldwin, we will explore how "black struggle" might be generatively aspirational, on the one hand, and yet, on the other, resisted as an ideal.  Does so much loss (of black life, of racial dignity, of state protection) mitigate against love as a viable ethic in the age of Trump?   Black struggle for black life and flourishing means nothing less than the very survival of the country, the very idea of America. 

Maurice Wallace is associate professor of English and the Associate Director of the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African American and African Studies at the University of Virginia. His primary fields of expertise include African American literature and cultural studies, nineteenth-century American literature, the history and representation of American slavery, and gender studies.

The author of Constructing the Black Masculine: Identity and Ideality in African American Men's Literature and Culture, 1775-1995, a book on the history of black manhood in African American letters, and co-editor of a collection of scholarly articles on early photography and African American identity entitled Pictures and Progress: Early Photography and the Making of African-American Identity, Wallace has served on the editorial boards for American Literature and Yale Journal of Criticism and is a contributing editor to James Baldwin Review

Wallace's current research and writing agendas include a monograph on early photography in the making of African American identity on the heels of the US Civil War, and a critical exploration into the sound of Martin Luther King's voice. He also teaches in areas of visual culture and sound studies.

Presented collaboratively with the Departments of English at Bates and Bowdoin Colleges

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Gallery Conversation: Urban Impressions: New York City in Prints, 1900-1940

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March 30, 2017 5:00 PM  – 6:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

The student curator of Urban Impressions, Sarah Freshnock, class of 2017, discusses the curatorial process and the various print techniques on view in this exhibition, which details how prints captured the spirit of New York City in the early twentieth century.

Photo: 
Smokehounds, 1935, etching. Museum Purchase, Barbara Cooney Porter Fund. Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

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Chris Emdin: "What it Takes To Be a Scientist: Employing Reality Pedagogy To Transform Schools and Society"

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March 30, 2017 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Chris Emdin explores participation and engagement in STEM fields and the ways that the education culture tracks students out of success in these disciplines. He uncovers reasons for youth disinterest in school and the STEM disciplines and how we can look for new educational approaches that foster participation and engagement in STEM without sacrificing rigor and content.  

To address these issues, Emdin developed 'Reality Pedagogy', an approach to teaching and learning that provides educators with seven practical tools for improving their practice. The tools of Reality Pedagogy are designed to support STEM educators across ANY discipline in becoming more effective in transforming their classroom, and are the pillars of Edmin's newest book, For White Folks Who Teach In The Hood and the Rest of Y'all Too

Emdin explores what it takes to be a scientist, how educators, parents, and the general public can hone those skills in youth, and why we have no choice but to re-focus on creating a new STEM generation.


Emdin is an associate professor in the department of mathematics, science and technology at Teachers College, Columbia University, where he also serves as director of science education at the Center for Health Equity and Urban Science Education. He holds a PhD in urban education with a concentration in mathematics, science, and technology; master'™s degrees in both natural sciences and education administration, and bachelor's degrees in physical anthropology, biology, and chemistry.

Sponsored by the Brodie Family Lecture Fund. Co-sponsored with the Center for Learning and Teaching, McKeen Center for the Common Good, Departments of Chemistry, Math, and Earth and Oceanographic Science, the Environmental Studies Program, and the Student Center for Multicultural Life.

Open to the public and free of charge.

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Symposium: "Perspectives from Postwar Hiroshima: Chuzo Tamotzu, Children's Drawings, and the Art of Resolution"

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March 31, 2017 1:00 PM  – 4:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

In conjunction with the exhibition Perspectives from Postwar Hiroshima: Chuzo Tamotzu, Children's Drawings, and the Art of Resolution, leading artists, historians, and art historians offer their perspectives on the cultural implications of World War II - particularly the atomic explosion in Hiroshima - for Japan and for Americans of Japanese descent in the United States.

The event explores the important role that art can play in expressing and responding to political and social conflict.

Speakers include
Yukiyo Kawano, artist, Portland, Oregon; Roger Shimomura, University Distinguished Professor of Art Emeritus, The University of Kansas; Mark Selden, professor emeritus of sociology and history, State University of New York at Binghamton; John K.W. Tchen, founding director, Asia/Pacific/American Institute; Aiko Izumisawa, independent scholar, Kagoshima, Japan; Michael Amano, Bowdoin Class of 2017; and Virginia Crow, Class of 2018.

Free and open to the public.

Photo: 
Kiyoji Hayashi, Japanese, Untitled (Schoolchild's Drawing from Hiroshima, Japan), 1953, mixed media. Lent by Dr. Marc B. Garnick '68 and Barbara Kates-Garnick, PhD

 

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Kristopher McNeill: "Environmental Photochemistry: From Triclosan to Dioxins."

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March 31, 2017 3:00 PM  – 4:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Triclosan is an antibacterial compound widely used in consumer products, including liquid soaps and toothpaste. Accordingly, triclosan has been found in surface waters that receive wastewater all over the world.

Photochemical degradation has been identified as a major loss process for triclosan in surface waters, which leads to short persistence of triclosan in such systems. This seemingly happy circumstance is accompanied by the worrisome discovery that triclosan's transformation products include chlorinated phenol, chlorinated dioxin and dihydroxy-PCB products.  

More recent work has revealed that the water treatment strategies greatly influence the prevalence of more toxic dioxin congeners in environmental systems.

This presentation will summarize the current state of knowledge and present unpublished work on the photochemistry of triclosan.

Professor Kristopher McNeill received his BA in chemistry in 1992 from Reed College (Portland, OR) and his PhD in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley in 1997.  At Berkeley, he was co-advised by Professors Robert Bergman and Richard Andersen. Following his PhD, he did postdoctoral work at MIT (1997-1999) with Professor Philip Gschwend in the department of civil and environmental engineering. He began his independent career as a faculty member at the University of Minnesota in the department of chemistry, holding ranks of assistant professor (2000-2006) and associate professor (2007-2009). In 2009, he joined the faculty of ETH Zurich.

Starting in 2016, McNeill was named the editor-in-chief of the Royal Society of Chemistry journal Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts. His research is focused on studying chemical reaction mechanisms involved in environmentally relevant processes, with an emphasis on environmental photochemistry.


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Reception: Perspectives from Postwar Hiroshima Chuzo Tamotzu, Children's Drawings, and the Art of Resolution

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March 31, 2017 4:30 PM  – 6:30 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

A reception to celebrate the exhibition and symposium, "Perspectives from Postwar Hiroshima Chuzo Tamotzu, Children's Drawings, and the Art of Resolution."

Open to the public free of charge.

Photo:  detail from  Untitled (Schoolchild’s Drawing from Hiroshima, Japan), 1953, mixed media by Taiko Terakawa,. Lent by Dr. Marc B. Garnick '68 and Barbara Kates-Garnick, PhD

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Cuba Week 2017: Primo Cubano Concert and Latin Dance!

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March 31, 2017 7:30 PM  – 10:00 PM
David Saul Smith Union, Morrell Lounge

Put on your dancing shoes and come celebrate Brunswick's sister city relationship with Trinidad, Cuba in the first event of Cuba Week 2017! This is the first event of Cuba Week 2017 sponsored by the Brunswick Trinidad Sister City Association. This event is also sponsored by Romance Languages and Literatures, Latin American Studies, Visual Arts, and the Latin American Student Organization (LASO).

Dance Lessons will start at 7:30 pm, followed by a concert and dance from 8:00 to 10:00 pm. Music for dancing will continue thereafter provided by LASO.
Suggested donation for non-Bowdoin community members $10.

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Film Screening: "Breathing under the Sea" (Souffler plus fort que la mer) with actor Aurelien Recoing

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April 1, 2017 3:30 PM  – 5:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Julie's family members have spent their entire lives fishing for a living on an island in Brittany. Now everyone must face a bitter reality: leave or die. Julie is young, pugnacious and an idealist.  She decides to fight to the end and stay with her family, even though her dreams of travelling and adventure are pulling her far from her roots.   

Aurelien Recoing, who plays Julie's father Loic, will be in the house during the screening.  Paris-born Recoing began his training as an actor in 1974 at the Cours Florent, studied at the Quartier d'Ivry, and joined the Conservatoire National Superieur d'Art Dramatique in Paris in 1977. Recoing's film-acting career spans nearly 30 years . He first became well-known for his starring role in the 2001 film Time Out.  His recent appearances include Kill Me Please - winner of the Grand Prix Marc Aurel d'Or at Rome's International Film Festival - and appearances as Adele's father in Blue is the Warmest Colour - which took the Palme d'Or at Cannes - and again as a father in Breathing Under the Sea.  Recoing also has had roles in more than 30 plays, as well as directing stage performances.  In 1989, he was awarded the Prix Gerard Philipe.

Presented by the Cinema Studies Program with sponsorship from Lectures and Concerts, the Resource Center for Sexual Diversity, the Romance Languages and Theater and Dance Departments, and the Bowdoin Film Society.






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Film Screening: "Blue is the Warmest Color" (La Vie d' Adele) with actor Aurelien Recoing

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April 1, 2017 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Adele's life is changed when she meets Emma, a young woman with blue hair. With Emma, Adele discovers desire and learns to assert herself as a woman and as an adult. Adele grows, seeks herself, loses herself, and ultimately finds herself through love and loss.

Blue unanimously won the Palme d'Or at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival, the first film to win the award for both the director and the lead actresses.  The film premiered to critical acclaim in North America at the 2013 Telluride Film Festival, and was nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Language Film and the BAFTA Award for Best Film Not in the English Language.


Aurelien Recoing plays Adele's father in the film, and will be in the house during the screening. 
Paris-born Recoing began his training as an actor in 1974 at the Cours Florent, studied at the Quartier d'Ivry, and joined the Conservatoire National Superieur d'Art Dramatique in Paris in 1977. Recoing's film-acting career spans nearly 30 years . He first became well-known for his starring role in the 2001 film Time Out.  His recent appearances include Kill Me Please - winner of the Grand Prix Marc Aurel d'Or at Rome's International Film Festival - and appearances in Blue is the Warmest Colour and Breathing Under the Sea.  Recoing also has had roles in more than 30 plays, as well as directing stage performances.  In 1989, he was awarded the Prix Gerard Philipe.

Presented by the Cinema Studies Program with sponsorship from Lectures and Concerts, the Resource Center for Sexual Diversity, the Romance Languages and Theater and Dance Departments, and the Bowdoin Film Society.





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Film Screening: "Return to Cuba: In the Footsteps of Walker Evans"

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April 2, 2017 4:00 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

In the film, Return to Cuba, five world-renowned photographers travel to the island nation just weeks before the historic US-Cuba reconciliation in 2014. Retracing the footsteps of legendary photographer Walker Evans, they reinvent his iconic 1930s images at a new historical tipping point. 

From the quick yet studied street-style photography of Sam Abell to the uncommon camera-obscura practices of Abelardo Morell, these master photographers reinterpret Cuba for the twenty-first century. This colorful documentary brings together five unique visions of Cuba's complex and transforming cultural landscape as director Ross McDermott intertwines Evans's pre-Castro Cuba with the busy streets of Havana and the countryside of Vinales. 

Return to Cuba was submitted to over twenty national and international film festivals in 2016.

Suggested donation for non-Bowdoin community members $5.

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Film Screening: A Choreographic Performance of Leo Tolstoy's 'Anna Karenina'

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April 2, 2017 6:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Directed and choreographed by Angelica Cholina, this Vakhtangov Theatre production of Anna Karenina is a modern dance interpretation of Leo Tolstoy's classic novel, originally published in serial installments from 1875 to 1877 in the periodical The Russian Messenger. Tolstoy's novel is widely considered a pinnacle of realist fiction. It tells the life story of the titular Anna, a St. Petersburg aristocrat trapped in an unhappy marriage and caught up in an ill-fated love affair, against the backdrop of late 19th century Russian society.
 
Cholina strives to find the equivalent of Tolstoy's words in harmony and movement, as every gesture holds as much meaning as a word. The music of Alfred Schnittke helps to reveal the depth of the characters with an elegance and mood corresponding to the amplitude of the novel.
 
Presented by Stage Russia and Specticast Entertainment. Director and choreographer: Angelica Cholina. Set to music by Alfred Schnittke.

Watch the theatrical trailer.

 
Screening from 6:00-9:00 PM (with short intermission).

Presented in Russian with English subtitles. All are welcome (open to the public). Free admission.


Sponsored by the Russian Department and supported with funds from the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund
 

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A Reading by Author Sarah Domet: 'The Guineveres'

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April 3, 2017 4:15 PM  – 6:00 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Sarah Domet will read from her debut novel, The Guineveres (Flatiron Books, October 2016). She is also the author of 90 Days to Your Novel (Writers Digest Books, 2010).

Domet holds a Ph.D. in literature and creative writing from the University of Cincinnati where she once served as the associate editor of The Cincinnati Review. Her short work has appeared in numerous journals, including Burrow Press Review, Beloit Fiction Journal, Potomac Review, Blue Stem, New Delta Review, Juked, Hobart, Talking Writing, and other places. In addition, her work has been anthologized in Sundress Publications Best of the Net 2015, New Delta Review Best of the Net 2010-2013, and Main Street Rag's Suspense Anthology.

Presented by the English Department Visiting Writers Series.

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Asad Ahmed: "Post-Classical Muslim Rationalism in the Age of Decline"

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April 3, 2017 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

This talk aims to show that the history of ma'qulat in South Asia was driven by non-trivial social and political contexts.  Taking up the example of a theological debate on the finality of the Prophet, this paper examines how reformist and establishment scholars deployed various technical tools in rationalist scholarship (especially logic) to argue for the validity of their position on this issue.  In the process, they breathed new life into several subfields of the rationalist disciplines.  This brief period of focus on the relevant technical tools was not due to some predictable orientation of texts, but was the product of the complex layers of the cultural, social, political, and technological landscapes of nineteenth century Muslim India. This event is sponsored by the Religion Department, History Department, Asian Studies Program and Lectures & Concerts.

  This event will be streamed live.


 



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Ada Cohen: "From Nimrud to (New) England: Assyrian Art Over Time"

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April 4, 2017 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Ada Cohen, Israel Evans Professor in Oratory and Belles Lettres and Professor of Art History at Dartmouth College, examines the exciting discoveries unearthed from the Assyrian site at Nimrud (Kalhu) during the nineteenth century in present-day Iraq and how many of the artifacts made their way into collections in Europe and the United States.

Free and open to the public.


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Harold and Iris Chandler Lecture - Matt Erlin: "Enlightenment Publication Networks"

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April 5, 2017 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

The Harold and Iris Chandler Lecture is the opening event of the symposium Network@1800: New Directions in German and European Cultural Studies.

Speaker Matt Erlin is professor of German at Washington University in St. Louis. His current research focuses on the use of digital and computational tools to challenge traditional notions of genre and period as they apply to eighteenth-and nineteenth-century German literature. His talk is entitled "Enlightenment Publication Networks".

Sponsored by the Bowdoin College Library under the auspices of the Harold and Iris Chandler Lectureship.

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Tour and Reception: Traveling Artists/Circulating Images-Tracing Eighteenth-Century Networks

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April 6, 2017 5:00 PM  – 7:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

The seeds for Bowdoin's art collection were planted in the eighteenth century, when the Bowdoin family gathered European art that was later bequeathed to the College. This tour investigates - through a selection of eighteenth century prints, drawings, and paintings - how art reflected and indeed established networks that spanned continents.

Organized in conjunction with the international symposium/Humboldt-Kolleg, Network@1800: New Directions in German and European Studies, hosted by the Department of German and Program in Digital and Computational Studies.

Photo: 
Johann Christian Reinhart, German, A Subiaco, 1793, etching. Museum Purchase, David P. Becker Fund. Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

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Audubon's 'Birds of America' Page-Turning with Special Guest Matthew Klingle

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April 7, 2017 12:30 PM  – 1:00 PM
Hawthorne Longfellow Library, Special Collections

Associate Professor of History and Environmental Studies and Director of Environmental Studies Program Matthew Klingle joins Special Collections & Archives staff for the monthly page-turning of Audubon's magnificent Birds of America.

Experience the excitement as we reveal the bird of the month and take home a keepsake button. Friday, April 7, 2017 at 12:30 p.m. in the Special Collections & Archives reading room on the third floor of the Hawthorne-Longfellow Library.

Free and open to the public.

Presented by the Bowdoin College Library.

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Family Saturday at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art

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April 8, 2017 10:00 AM  – 11:00 AM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Bowdoin College students present "Family Saturday" with activities related to the exhibitions on view. Enjoy interactive learning and fun.

Photo:  Families enjoy a visit to the Museum of Art

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Ann Koloski-Ostrow: "Pompeii, Herculaneum, and the Sensorium of the Roman Urban Landscape"

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April 12, 2017 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Professor Koloski-Ostrow's talk explores the sensorium of Pompeii and Herculaneum (from the perspective of all five senses-sight, sound, smell, touch, and taste) using textual and archaeological evidence in order to explore how it can sharpen our understanding of life on Roman streets, in public spaces, and in private dwellings. In this endeavor Koloski-Ostrow reviews a series of the chief institutions and structures of the Roman city (streets, houses and apartment buildings, shops, presence of live animals everywhere, and public venues, including public toilets, theaters, the forum, marketplaces, baths, temples and temple precincts, cemeteries, and the amphitheater).

Even if the Romans were "desensitized" to the potentially powerful impact of the urban sensorium and could somehow block, for example, noxious odors within seconds to minutes from their brains and noses, as modern science is proving about the human nose (M. I. Greenberg, J. A. Curtis, and D. Vearrier), and even if individual Romans could voluntarily learn to quell at will shocking reactions to stimuli affecting their five senses, as other scientists are currently demonstrating (E. W. Corty, R. E. Minehart, and N. M. Campbell), this investigation into the nature of the sensorium at Pompeii and Herculaneum revivifies the complexity of the ancient city and contributes to a better understanding of Roman life and even of urban zoning.

Professor Ann Olga Koloski-Ostrow (fondly known to her students as Professor AOK-O) has done archaeological fieldwork at Herculaneum, Pompeii, Tel Heshbon in Jordan, and Carthage in Tunisia, and survey work in Croatia, Cyprus, Egypt, Israel, Lebanon, Libya, and Turkey.  Her scholarship focuses on ancient daily life, especially in the Roman world at Pompeii, urban infrastructure, plumbing and hydraulics, baths and bathing practices, and toilets and sanitation.  She is Chair and Co-Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Classical Studies at Brandeis.  She holds an M.A. in Latin and Greek language and literature and a Ph.D. from the Interdepartmental Program in Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Michigan.

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Robin Reisenfeld"The Presence of Spirituality in German Avant-Garde Responses to World War I"

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April 13, 2017 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Robin Reisenfeld, curator, works on paper, Toledo Museum of Art , discusses German avant-garde artists' responses to World War I and the spiritual emphasis of the works created towards the conclusion of the War. Her talk will focus on predominantly prints and works on paper.

This lecture is organized in conjunction with Modern Medieval: Materiality and Spirituality in German Expressionism.

Free and open to the public.


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One Book, One Community Film Screening and Discussion: "Broken on All Sides"

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April 17, 2017 4:30 PM  – 6:15 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Join us for a viewing of the compelling documentary, Broken on All Sides:  Race, Mass Incarceration & New Visions for Criminal Justice in the U.S., which focuses on mass incarceration across the nation and the intersection of race and poverty within criminal justice.

The film will be followed by a community discussion led by Leana Amaez, Associate Dean of Students for Diversity and Inclusion, Dean of Student Affairs. This program is being held in conjunction with Curtis Memorial Library's "One Book, One Community" reading program. 

Monday, April 17, 2017
Beam Classroom, VAC
4:30pm - 6:15pm

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