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Academic Life
Professor Henry Laurence Asks 'Can Public Broadcasting Help Save Democracy?'

Among the threats to democracy today, says Laurence, is a crisis in journalism brought about partly by the fact that there's simply "too much information" out there. This has fueled an increasing polarization in public opinion, he argues, and spawned a growth in sensationalist, opinionated, misleading or even false journalism.

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Student Life
Students and Staff Lop Off, Donate 130 Inches of Hair to Charity

Sixteen people on campus who previously had long, naturally colored hair have sporty new cuts in time for summer. They were the students and staff who stopped by the Sail Room last week to donate more than eight inches of their hair to Pantene Beautiful Lengths, an organization that makes free wigs for cancer patients.

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Featured Events

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Pop-Up Poetry Under the Calder: Reading by Helen Ross, Class of 2018

April 24, 201812:00 PM – 12:15 PM
H-L Library, 1st floor

Pop-Up Poetry Under the Calder: Celebrating National Poetry Month

Join us under Alexander Calder's Red Fossils mobile in H-L Library, at noon every weekday in April, to hear a student, faculty, or staff member read a favorite poem. First Floor, Hawthorne-Longfellow Library. 

This series is dedicated to Professor of English Celeste Goodridge, 1954-2018

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"Fashioning a Home in Early America" Celebrating the Decorative Arts

April 24, 201812:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Don Hare ’51, collector and fine woodworker; Laura Fecych Sprague, senior consulting curator; and Joachim Homann, curator, introduce new acquisitions of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century seating furniture, chests, and silver tablewares.

Presented by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art. 

Free and open to the public.

Image:  A view of the Bowdoin Gallery at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

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"For the Love of Color" Exhibit Talk with Photographer Cig Harvey

April 25, 201812:00 PM – 1:00 PM
HL Second Floor Gallery

Join photographer Cig Harvey for a conversation about color and its influences on her life and work. Harvey's artist book Running Towards Us and neon art of the same name are both on view in the Library's Spring 2018 exhibition On A Different Wavelength: A Celebration of Color in Books.

 

Supported by the Annie Talbot Cole Lectureship Fund.

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Pop-Up Poetry Under the Calder: Reading by Sakura Christmas, Assistant Professor of History and Asian Studies

April 25, 201812:00 PM – 12:15 PM
H-L Library, 1st floor

Pop-Up Poetry Under the Calder: Celebrating National Poetry Month

Join us under Alexander Calder's Red Fossils mobile in H-L Library, at noon every weekday in April, to hear a student, faculty, or staff member read a favorite poem. First Floor, Hawthorne-Longfellow Library. 

This series is dedicated to Professor of English Celeste Goodridge, 1954-2018

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Novel Creatures: Animal Life and the New Millennium - Book Launch and Discussion with Hilary Thompson

April 26, 20184:15 PM – 5:15 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Join us for a book launch and discussion of Novel Creatures (Routledge 2018) with the author, Assistant Professor of English Hilary Thompson, moderated by Associate Professor of English Ann Kibbie.

Thompson teaches and publishes on contemporary literature, particularly on questions of the animal and globalization. Her work has appeared most recently in The City Since 9/11: Literature, Film, Television and Creatural Fictions: Human-Animal Relationships in Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Literature.

In Novel Creatures, Thompson takes a close look at the expanding interest in animals in modern times and argues that the novels of this period reveal a dramatic shift in conceptions of "creatureliness." She explains that scholars have recently turned to the term "creaturely" to describe shared aspects of human and animal experience, thus moving beyond work that primarily attends to distinctions between the human and the animal. Carrying forward this scholarship, Thompson's Novel Creatures argues that creatureliness has been an intensely millennial preoccupation, but in two contrasting forms—one leading up to the turn of the millennium, and the other appearing after the tragic events of 9/11.

Presented by the English Department

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Music at the Museum: George Lopez Performs in Conjunction with the Exhibition 'Richard Pousette Dart: Painting/Light/Space

April 26, 20185:00 PM – 6:15 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Beckwith Artist-in-Residence George Lopez performs an evening of music in conjunction with the exhibition Richard Pousette-Dart: Painting/Light/Space.

The same program will be performed at the 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. concerts.

Limited Seating. Free tickets required. Call 207-725-3276.

 

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Music at the Museum: George Lopez Performs in Conjunction with the Exhibition 'Richard Pousette Dart: Painting/Light/Space

April 26, 20187:00 PM – 8:15 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Beckwith Artist-in-Residence George Lopez performs an evening of music in conjunction with the exhibition Richard Pousette-Dart: Painting/Light/Space.

The same program will be performed at the 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. concerts.

Limited Seating. Free tickets required. Call 207-725-3276.

 

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"Human Rights and Transitional Justice in the Latin American Cold War" with Georgia Whitaker '14

April 26, 20187:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Searles Science Building, 315

"Latin America has long been regarded as the object of human rights concerns more than a contributor to human rights thinking,” legal scholar Paolo Carozza pronounced in 2003. Despite Latin Americans’ seminal contributions to international human rights law through the 1917 Mexican Constitution, the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the leftist social movements of the 1970s, Latin America is still seen as a region where human rights norms are violated rather than created.

In this talk, Georgia Whitaker '14 will explore the Latin American history of human rights in the context of the Cold War, focusing on the fraught relationship between the transnational left and the human rights movement. She will emphasize how human rights discourses changed during the Latin American Cold War with important consequences for how we think about state terror, neoliberalism, the making and unmaking of inequality, and the ways in which dictatorships reckon with the past and transition to democracy.

Whitaker '14 is currently a PhD candidate at Harvard University.

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"Dostoevsky in the 21st Century" with Kate Holland

April 27, 20181:30 PM – 3:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

What does it mean to be a reader of Dostoevsky in the twenty-first century? Almost two hundred years after his birth, his novels are as important as ever. In this age of the endless news cycle, terror, and social upheaval, we face problems Dostoevsky made central to his works: ideas vs. actions, absolute truths vs. negotiable “facts,” self-interest vs. self-sabotage.

In this talk, Kate Holland explores the strategies Dostoevsky developed to dramatize the divided modern consciousness in 1870s Russia and finds contemporary parallels in how we present our lives and ideas online for social consumption today.

Holland is associate professor of Russian literature in the department of Slavic languages and literatures at the University of Toronto, where she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on Russian literature, culture, and theory and coordinates the department’s undergraduate programs. She is the author of The Novel in the Age of Disintegration: Dostoevsky and the Problem of Genre in the 1870s (Northwestern University Press, 2013), and the coeditor of A Dostoevskii Companion: Texts and Contexts (forthcoming in 2018 with Academic Studies Press) as well as articles on Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Saltykov-Shchedrin, Herzen, and Russian Literary Theory.

Holland received her PhD from Yale University in 2004. In 2016 she was the co-organizer of an outreach project and conference celebrating 150 years of Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment. She is the co-organizer of a 2018 international conference and edited volume planned to celebrate the 200th anniversary of Dostoevsky’s birth in 2021. She is a board member of the North American Dostoevsky Society, a founding member of that Society’s Readers’ Advisory Board, and book review editor of the literature and culture section of Canadian Slavonic Papers.

Sponsored by the Department of Russian, with the generous support of a loyal Bowdoin family.

Free and open to the public.

 

 

 

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Immateriality and Infinity: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Richard Pousette-Dart's Paintings

May 1, 201812:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Jennifer Taback, professor of mathematics; Anna A. Golovkova, Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Religion; and Peggy Wang, assistant professor of art history and Asian studies, discuss the conceptual and spiritual underpinnings of Richard Pousette-Dart’s paintings from the 1960s and 1970s.

Presented by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art in conjunction with the exhibition, Richard Pousette-Dart: Painting/Light/Space.

Image: Presence, Amaranth Garden #1, 1974, oil on linen, by Richard Pousette-Dart. © 2017 Estate of Richard Pousette-Dart / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph by Kerry Ryan McFate, courtesy of Pace Gallery.

 

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Pop-Up Event: Unfolding Ed Ruscha's Every Building on the Sunset Strip

May 2, 20182:30 PM – 4:00 PM
Hawthorne Longfellow Library, Nixon Lounge

Ed Ruscha’s “Every Building on the Sunset Strip” (1966) is a seminal early artist book, rarely unfolded to its full 25-foot length.

The accordion-folded book depicts two continuous photographic views of the mile and half section of the landmark Sunset Strip that passes through West Hollywood, California.

Join students from Shoot, Snap, Instagram: A History of Photography in America, taught by Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Art History Tara Kohn, for presentations on Ruscha, photography, and more as the staff of Special Collections & Archives unfold this work to its full length.

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Blind Field Shuttle Walk with Social Practice Artist Carmen Papalia

May 4, 20181:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Internationally acclaimed social practice artist Carmen Papalia makes participatory projects on the topic of access as it relates to public space, the art institution, and visual culture. His Blind Field Shuttle walks are non-visual tours in which he leads participants on eyes-closed walks through urban and rural spaces to perceive their surroundings in new and exciting ways. 

Join him as he leads a Blind Field Shuttle of the Bowdoin College quad, offering participants new perspectives on the accessibility of our shared spaces.

Presented by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art in conjunction with the exhibition Second Sight: the Paradox of Vision in Contemporary Art.

 


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