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Academic Life
Prof. Gillespie Has Big Plans for Russian Program

Gillespie says it's a "matter of national security that we produce a new generation of Russia specialists who possess deep linguistic and cultural expertise."

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Student Life
Maine Coast Inspires Fellows To Write: Maya Morduch-Toubman ’18

Two Bowdoin students — Maya Morduch-Toubman ’18 and Aleksia Silverman ’19 — spent this summer exploring Maine's coast, gathering material for writing projects that aim to capture, in different ways, a bit of what it means to live here.

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Featured Events

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Workshop with Artist Elise Ansel: "Tracing the Artist's Hand"

August 24, 20176:30 PM – 8:15 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Elise Ansel, artist, discusses changing approaches to mark-making on paper and leads participants in hands-on activities.  Presented in conjunction with the exhibition, Why Draw? 500 Years of Drawing and Printmaking at Bowdoin College.

Due to limited space, free tickets are required.  Please telephone 207-725-3276 or e-mail cbaljon@bowdoin.edu for tickets.

Photo: Installation view of the exhibition, "Why Draw?"


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Joachim Homann: "Egon Schiele, Pablo Picasso, Henry Moore: The Figure in Drawings of the European Avant-Garde"

August 25, 201712:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Joachim Homann, curator at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, leads a discussion of experimental approaches to the figure, exemplified by European drawings from 1914 to 1945 in the exhibition Why Draw: 500 Years of Drawings and Watercolors at Bowdoin College.

Presented by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.  Free and open to the public.

Photo:  Installation view of the exhibition "Why Draw?"

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Nicholas Basbanes: "On Materiality: A Cultural Consideration of Paper and the Book"

August 30, 20174:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Join bibliophile and author Nicholas Basbanes for a talk that explores the rich cultural context of paper and the book in celebration of the opening of the Library's fall 2017 exhibition, Bound and Determined: The Remarkable Physical History of the Book.

A reception on the second floor gallery of the Hawthorne-Longfellow Library immediately follows the lecture.


Free and open to the public.

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"Appreciating Paper: Art's Best Supporting Actor"

August 31, 20174:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

How did historic European artists choose their papers? Since when are drawings on paper considered art? When did we begin to speak of "works on paper"?  Ruth Fine, former curator of special projects in modern art, National Gallery of Art, and Marjorie Shelley, Sherman Fairchild Conservator in Charge, The Metropolitan provide answers.

Sponsored by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.  Free and open to the public.

Photo:  Gallery of the exhibition, Why Draw?  500 Years of Drawings and Watercolors.

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A Conversation With Sir Paul Ruddock

September 7, 20177:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

In conjunction with the opening of the Ivory Mirror, collector and philanthropist Sir Paul Ruddock, will talk about the pleasures of collecting, the delights of medieval ivories, and the importance of art to civilization. Facilitated by Stephen Perkinson, Peter M. Small Associate Professor of Art History. This event is free, but registration is required as seating is limited. Photo: Sir Paul Ruddock at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Photo by David Vintiner. Click here to register! 

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Second Friday Brunswick at the Museum of Art

September 8, 20174:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

The Bowdoin College Museum of Art participates in "Second Friday Brunswick!"€ Enjoy the exhibitions during extended hours, until 7:00 pm.

 
Free and open to the public.

Second Friday Brunswick! is organized by the Brunswick Downtown Association and is intended to give residents and visitors a unique opportunity to engage with the arts. Second Friday Brunswick! offers a fun evening of artistic exploration featuring visual art, live music, dance and theatrical performances, and extended shopping hours all within walking distance of Maine Street.

See the Downtown Brunswick Association website for the full schedule of events in town!


Photo: Visitors enjoy the Bowdoin College Museum of Art

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Book Salon: "The Ivory Mirror" and Memento Mori in Shakespeare's "Hamlet"

September 10, 20172:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Aaron Kitch, associate professor, English, and Stephen Perkinson, Peter M. Small associate professor, art history, and guest curator of The Ivory Mirror lead a conversation about Shakespeare 's Hamlet and the role of the memento mori in this famous drama. On the eve of the anniversary of September 11th, Professor Kitch will consider, among other topics, the range of cultural meanings of death that are historically specific, considering Shakespeare's era in relation to our own. 


Presented in conjunction with the exhibition, The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe.


 Photo: John Philip Kemble as Hamlet, oil on canvas, by Jeremiah Pearson Hardy, American, 1800-1887. Gift of The Honorable Karl R. Philbrick, Class of 1923. Bowdoin College Museum of Art.
 


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"The Ivory Mirror" Film Series: Modern Day Macabre: Ghosts, Zombies, and the Supernatural in Cinema

September 12, 20177:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Many films deal with death, the afterlife, and the macabre. The classic horror film, Suspiria, 1977, by Italian director Dario Argento, is the first of three films in the series, screened in conjunction with The Ivory Mirror. Followed by a discussion with Allison Cooper, assistant professor of romance languages and literatures and cinema studies, Romance Languages and Jill Smith, Osterweis associate arofessor of German, Bowdoin College.

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

Free and open to the public.

Photo: The poster for the 1977 film, Suspiria

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"Exhibiting Ivory Today: Historical Artifacts in a Contemporary Context"

September 13, 20177:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

This program explores the historic significance of ivory as an artistic medium and the implication of new regulations on the transport of ivory nationally and internationally as part of efforts to protect elephants and other endangered species.

Stephen J. Knerly Jr., Esq., Hahn Loeser & Parks LLP; Genevieve LeMoine, curator, Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum; and Stephen Perkinson, Peter M. Small associate professor of art history, offer multiple perspectives on this issue.

Presented by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art  in conjunction with the exhibition, The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe.

Free and open to the public.

Image: 
Memento Mori Pendant probably from a rosary, France or Belgium, ca. 1500, ivory. Walter E. Stait Fund, 2007, Philadelphia Museum of Art.



Exhibit Talk: The Book at Bowdoin

September 15, 201712:00 PM – 12:30 PM
HL Second Floor Gallery

Join the Library exhibition curators Kat Stefko and Marieke Van Der Steenhoven for a conversation about Bound and Determined: The Remarkable Physical History of the Book and the rare book collections at Bowdoin.


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Family Saturday at the Museum of Art

September 16, 201710:00 AM – 11:00 AM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Enjoy "Family Saturday" with activities related to the exhibitions on view, led by Bowdoin College students.

Presented by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art . Free and open to the public.

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"The Devil Lies, and So We Die: A Historian's Perspective on Memento Mori"

September 19, 201712:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

 Dallas Denery, professor of history, offers insights into the historical, intellectual, and technical factors that contributed to the rise of the memento mori in the early sixteenth century.

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

Presented by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

Photo: 
Finial of a Chaplet, France or southern Netherlands, ca. 1530 with mid-nineteenth-century insertion (ca. 1850-1860), elephant ivory. Victoria and Albert Museum, London.




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Private Uses and Public Spaces: Los Angeles Beaches in the 1920s

September 19, 20174:15 PM – 5:15 PM
Searles Science Building, 315

Today, Los Angeles is lined with public beaches, free or inexpensive parking lots, campgrounds, lifeguard stations, bathrooms and showers.  But in the 1920s, most of the shoreline was either about to become a private playground or a heavily polluted industrial zone.  Small cottages and private beach clubs closed the beach to public use in some areas.  Oil wells loomed over and polluted beaches in others.  This talk about the history of Los Angeles' beaches will explain why Americans saw beaches as important recreational lands in the 1920s and 1930s, and how the political movement to preserve beaches began.  But it also discusses the negative side of the public beach movement:  racial segregation in the early twentieth century United States.  The story of how Los Angeles acquired its signature public shoreline is the story of Americans' understanding of the public interest, special interests, race, and the beach itself.

Sarah S. Elkind (University of Michigan, 1994) teaches environmental, political, urban and public history at San Diego State University (SDSU), and runs SDSU's public history internship program. She curated "Sunshine and Superheroes" for the Oakland Museum of California in 2014.  This student-designed exhibit used ComicCon to examine  San Diego's tourism industry and American popular culture. In 2011, she published How Local Politics Shape Federal Policy:  Business, Power and the Environment in Twentieth Century Los Angeles.  This study of oil drilling, beaches, air pollution, flooding and water resources development in Southern California explains how business groups secured their influence in Los Angeles politics, and how local priorities drove federal policy in the mid-twentieth century.  Her other works include Bay Cities and Water Politics: The Battle for Resources in Boston and Oakland (Kansas, 1998) which won the Abel Wolman prize for best book in public works history in 1998; and Public Works and Public Health: Reflections on Urban Politics and Environment, 1880-1925 (Public Works Historical Society, 1999).   She is currently researching the evolution of national identity in Europe and the United States in two comparative studies, one considering American and Spanish water resources development, and  another probing cowboys and Vikings in American and Danish popular history and museums.


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