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Featured Events

Santagata Lecturer Dorothea Rockburne: "Materializing Mathematical Concepts into Visual Art"

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April 20, 20157:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

When Dorothea Rockburne first began making her paintings and works on paper in the 1950s, she never thought that her pieces would be viewed in an exhibition context, both because she was a woman, and because her mathematics-inspired paintings didn't fit neatly into Abstract Expressionism or subsequently Minimalism. Consequently, she believed she would never be able to show her work. Her assumptions, of course, proved to be false.

Rockburne not only exhibited, but she did so widely. When the big museums and galleries first started showing female artists in the late 1960s, they were looking for formed work; she was there right at the beginning of the feminist art movement. Since then and throughout her artistic career, Rockburne has created shapes that reflect her profound understanding of mathematical theory. Learning from the legendary mathematician Max Dehn as a student at Black Mountain College, and nurtured by friendships with experimental artists such as Robert Rauschenberg and John Cage, she found compelling ways to apply the creativity of mathematics to painting.

Rockburne was born in Canada and received her initial training in Montreal. She holds a doctorate of fine arts and is a long-time member of the New York art scene. A traveling retrospective, Dorothea Rockburne: In My Mind's Eye, was organized by the Parrish Museum, Southampton, New York in 2011. According to Frieze magazine, it "reaffirmed Rockburne's claim to a central position in the American avant-garde." When the Museum of Modern Art in New York dedicated an exhibition to her work in the winter of 2013-2014, a New York Times reviewer commented, "Ms. Rockburne's work can be as physical as it is heady, turning math into a kind of dance or a form of Process Art."

Sponsored by the Kenneth V. Santagata Memorial Fund
Note: This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin's Live Webcasts page.

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Dorothea Rockburne and Dave Peifer, Gallery Conversation: "Art, Mathematics, and the Legacy of Black Mountain College"

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April 21, 20154:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Dorothea Rockburne, artist, and Dave Peifer, chair and professor, University of North Carolina-Asheville, discuss the mathematical theories behind Rockburne's artistic work. They further explain how her art reflects the interdisciplinary education provided by the legendary Black Mountain College, where Rockburne studied with the theoretical mathematician Max Dehn (1878-1952). Peifer is a member of the Board of Directors of the Black Mountain College Museum and Arts Center in Asheville, North Carolina.

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition, A Gift of Knowing: The Art of Dorothea Rockburne.

Free and open to the public.

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Poet, Novelist, and Playwright Carmen Boullosa: "My Roots"

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April 21, 20157:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Carmen Boullosa is one of Mexico's leading poets, novelists, and playwrights. The prolific author, who has had literally scores of books, essays and dissertations written about her, will join us to talk about the literary roots that have nourished her, including Mexican authors Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, Rosario Castellanos, and writers of international renown. She will also explore the impact of influences that were forced on youth of her generation, from the nuns who ran her elementary school to the established gender roles of Latin America.

Boullosa (Mexico City, 1954) has published seventeen novels, the most recent being Texas: The Great Theft (Alfaguara, English translation by Samantha Schnee at Deep Vellum) and Las Paredes Hablan (Siruela). She received the Xavier Villaurrutia Prize in Mexico, the Anna Seghers and Liberaturpreis in Germany, and the Cafe Gijon Prize of Madrid. She has been a Guggenheim Fellow, a Cullman Center Fellow, and is a FONCA fellow.

She held the Andres Bello Chair at New York University, and the Alfonso Reyes Chair at La Sorbonne. In addition to being a distinguished professor at Georgetown University and Columbia University, Boullosa taught at City College New York for years. She hosts the five times NY-EMMY winner TV show Nueva York.

This lecture is generously funded by the Anne Talbots Cole Lectureship Fund with support from the Latin American Studies Program and the Department of Romance Languages.

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A Filmmaker's Perspective with David Conover: "The Arrival of the Drones"

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April 21, 20157:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Wendell Berry once wrote "If you want to see where you are, you will have to get out of your space vehicle, out of your car, off your horse, and walk over the ground." Maybe not. Some people fear them. Others embrace them. Take a closer look at what drones can - and cannot - see.

Filmmaker David Conover has actively worked with drones for four years and will share his observations, footage, and stories of freedom, control, death, and creativity in this screening and talk. 
 
Sponsored by the Office of the Dean for Academic Affairs and the Cinema Studies Program. For more information, contact the Cinema Studies Program at 725-3552 or lholland@bowdoin.edu.

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Judith Weisenfeld: "Real True Buds: On Race, Sex, and Celibacy in the Kingdom of Father Divine"

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April 22, 20154:30 PM – 6:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Father Divine's interracial, sex-segregated, communal movement captured the imagination of the American public in its heyday of the 1930s and 1940s when it counted thousands of followers who believed that Divine was God in a body, Christ returned toearth.

 Judith Weisenfeld will explore popular responses to the movement's theology of sexuality,often in the form of salacious conjecture about race and sexuality in what mostcharacterized as a 'cult', and consider how devoted members understood the relationshipbetween race and sexuality in what they believed was the Kingdom of God onearth.

Weisenfeld is the Agate Brown and George L. Collord Professor of Religion and Associate Faculty in the Center for African American Studies and the Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies at Princeton University.     

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Ryan Balot: "Thucydides on the Perils of Manliness"

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April 22, 20155:00 PM – 6:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Thucydides was an Athenian historian, philosopher, author, and general. He has been dubbed the father of "scientific history" because of his strict standards of evidence-gathering and analysis of cause and effect without reference to intervention by the gods. He has also been called the father of the school of political realism, which views the relations between nations as based on might rather than right. He showed an interest in developing an understanding of human nature to explain behaviour in such crises as plague, massacres, and civil war.

Ryan Balot, professor of political science and classics at the University of Toronto, will examine the political philosophies of Thucydides through this presentation. Balot is author of Greed and Injustice in Classical Athens (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2001) and Courage in the Democratic Polis: Ideology and Critique in Classical Athens (New York: Oxford University Press, 2014), among other books. He specializes in early modern and classical political thought, and he received his doctorate in Classics at Princeton University.

Before moving to Political Science at Toronto, Balot taught for nearly a decade in the Classics departments at Union College and Washington University in St. Louis, as both a Greek historian and a classical philologist. His research has been funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, and the Teagle Foundation of New York. His essays and reviews have appeared in such venues as Political Theory, Ancient Philosophy, Social Research, and The Journal of Hellenic Studies. His current projects include work on Machiavelli's republicanism, Aristotle and the mixed regime, and Plato's Laws.

Professor Balot's talk is co-sponsored by Bowdoin's departments of Classics and Government and Legal Studies with support from the John C. Donovan Lecture Fund. The fund was established at Bowdoin College in 1990 by family members, professional colleagues and friends of John C. Donovan, who served as Bowdoin's DeAlva Stanwood Alexander Professor of Government from 1965 until his death in 1984. Established through the leadership of Shepard Lee, Bowdoin Class of 1947, this fund is used to support lectures in the field of political science.

Free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

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Francophone Film Festival: The Lovely Month of May (Le Joli Mai)

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April 22, 20157:00 PM – 9:45 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

This landmark documentary, co-directed by Chris Marker and Pierre
Lhomme, was filmed in May of 1962, just after the passage of the Evian Accords, which officially ended the Algerian War. During this "first springtime of peace" - the first time in 23 years that France was not involved in any war - the filmmakers interviewed a random assortment of people on the streets of Paris, an endeavor that was made possible by new technological advances, such as portable 16mm sync cameras. Marker, unseen, prompts his interviewees -  ranging from highbrow engineers to a destitute mother to an Algerian teenager to a West African student - with questions about their personal lives and their feelings about larger political and social matters. Giving shape to these candid responses is Simone Signoret's piquant, poetic narration (co-written by Marker), which balances astringent assessments about Parisians' disengagement
with the world with an unequivocal empathy for many of the film's
interlocutors.

Presented as part of the Bowdoin Francophone Film Festival, a part of the Tournees Festival, and made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the US, the Centre National de la Cinematographie et de l'Image Animee, and the Franco-American Cultural Fund.

Additional support provided by the Department of Romance Languages, La Famille francophone, as well as the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund.

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Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society: A Conversation with Cristina Malcolmson

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April 23, 20154:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

In her most recent book, Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society: Boyle, Cavendish, Swift (Ashgate, 2013), Cristina Malcolmson demonstrates how unstable the idea of race remained in England at the end of the seventeenth century, and yet how extensively the intertwined institutions of government, colonialism, the slave trade, and science were collaborating to usher it into public view.

Arguing that the early Royal Society moved science toward racialization by giving skin color a new prominence as an object of experiment and observation, Malcolmson provides the first book-length examination of studies of skin color in the society. She also brings new light to the relationship between early modern literature, science, and the establishment of scientific racism in the nineteenth century.

Malcolmson, professor of English at Bates College, has also written The 'Empire of Man over the Inferior Creatures': British Women, Race, and Seventeenth-Century Science for The Palgrave History of British Women's Writing, and a collaborative article with Ruth Paley (first author) and Michael Hunter on 'Parliament and Slavery 1660-c.1700' which appeared in the journal Slavery and Abolition in 2010.

Sponsored by the English Department. For more information, contact the English Department at 725-3552 or lholland@bowdoin.edu.

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Sophy Downes: "From the Shore of One Sea to the Shore of Another Sea: Imperial Architecture Around the Classical Mediterranean"

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April 23, 20155:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Sophy Downes is a specialist in Persian History and Architecture--especially Persian interactions with Classical Greece. In this talk she examines the relationships between physical sites and the political circumstances under which they were built, specifically the material, formal, or even stylistic properties of the sites and the precise mechanisms and processes by which these properties create responses, and promote types of interaction with political significance.This lecture will be of interest not only to architectural historians and historians of empire, but will also touch upon the ancient divide between West and East--a divide which still looms large in modern theories of international relations. 

Downes earned her BA in Literae Humaniores at Oxford, followed by an MPhil in Classical Archaeology at Cambridge. She then spent two years as a Research Assistant at the British School at Rome before returning to the Institute of Archaeology at University College London for her PhD; a comparative study of the Athenian Akropolis and the Achaemenid Persian capital of Persepolis. She spent three months in Athens on a Marie Curie fellowship at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and immediately after held a residential post-doctoral fellowship at the British Institute of Persian Studies in Tehran. She has continued with teaching fellowships at University College London, the American University of Rome, and University of Edinburgh. 
Sponsored by the Stahl Lectureship, Classics, History, Art History and the Mellon Initiative in Mediterranean Studies.

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Francophone Film Festival: The Missing Picture (L'Image Manquante)

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April 23, 20157:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

How can a filmmaker portray incomprehensible barbarity, especially when he himself and everyone he knew and loved was directly affected by this horror? Rithy Panh ingeniously uses carved and painted figures to represent himself and his family (and many others), who had to flee Phnom Penh for agricultural labor camps on April 17, 1975, the day that the Khmer Rouge seized Cambodia's capital city. 

In calm, occasionally astringent first-person narration, we learn that Panh was 13 when Pol Pot began his genocidal regime; by 1979, the year that the Khmer Rouge leader was removed from power, the director's parents, sisters, and a niece and nephew were dead, among the millions who perished. 
The title refers to the fact that almost all of the documentary footage - snippets of which is interspersed throughout the film - that exists from the Khmer Rouge's horrific four-year reign is nothing but propaganda that glorifies the party and its commander. What was never documented was the legions of Cambodians and their relentless suffering. Against intricately detailed dioramas, Panh's small clay human surrogates inexorably, almost magically, assume the qualities and dimensions of real people.

Presented as part of the Bowdoin Francophone Film Festival, a part of the Tournees Festival, and made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the US, the Centre National de la Cinematographie et de l'Image Animee, and the Franco-American Cultural Fund.

Additional support provided by the Department of Romance Languages, La Famille francophone, as well as the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund.

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Robert Hettich: "Development of a Proteogenomic Approach for the Characterization of the Functions and Metabolic Activities of the Human Gut Microbiome"

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April 24, 20153:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

The human gastrointestinal tract is a complex ecosystem containing a delicate balance of human and microbial cells involved in an intricate symbiotic relationship. In general, the microbial constituency helps maintain a healthy environment and aids in efficient digestion. However, environmental and/or genetic factors may result in an altered bacterial composition that manifests in a diseased condition, such as Crohn's disease. 

 In his talk, Robert Hettich will discuss how the recent availability of whole community genome sequencing and whole community proteomics has provided unique capabilities of profiling the compositions and activities of this microbiome without having to cultivate its membership. He describes the development of a non-targeted, mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify the microbial proteins in human fecal samples; how proteome samples were characterized via a multidimensional LC tandem mass spectrometric approach on a hybrid linear ion trap-Orbitrap, yielding greater than four thousand proteins per sample; how amongst the microbial membership, the Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium spoecies were the abundant, as expected since these are known to be common in the human gut. The majority of the microbial proteins that were identified were classified into functional categories for translation, energy generation, and carbohydrate metabolism. Surprisingly, a number of innate human immunity proteins were also observed, suggesting a level of human regulation of microbial abundance. Finally, he explains how the results of his study demonstrate that it is possible to obtain high quality, extensive protein identifications by integrating metagenomic and metaproteomic information from human gut micro biomes. 

Hettich is a scientist on the senior research staff with the organic and biological mass spectrometry group in the chemical sciences division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He holds a Ph.D. analytical chemistry from Purdue University, a B.S. in chemistry from South Dakota School of Mines and Technology,?and is an adjunct faculty member for genome sciences and technology at the University of Tennessee graduate school in Knoxville.

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Bowdoin Middle Eastern Ensemble: Music from the Arabic and Ottoman Turkish Traditions

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April 27, 20157:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Studzinski Recital Hall, Kanbar Auditorium



The Bowdoin Middle Eastern Ensemble, directed by Eric LaPerna and Amos Libby, will present classical and contemporary music from the Arabic and Ottoman Turkish traditions.

The ensemble performs on traditional Middle Eastern musical instruments like the oud (Middle Eastern lute) and qanun (seventy-two-stringed Middle Eastern zither) as well vocals and Western instruments along with Middle Eastern percussion.

Note: This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin?s Live Webcasts page.

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Afro-Latin Music Ensemble with Director Michael Birenbaum Quintero

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April 29, 20157:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Studzinski Recital Hall, Kanbar Auditorium


Under the direction of Michael Birenbaum Quintero, Bowdoin's Afro-Latin Music Ensemble will present a concert highlighting the scintillating rhythms and cultural richness of the descendants of Africans in Latin America, including music from Colombia, Cuba, and Peru. 

Michael Birenbaum Quintero, assistant professor of music, studies music and political movements in Colombia, focusing on the Afro-Colombian music of the Pacific coast. He began his tenure track position at Bowdoin in Fall 2010. He teaches courses on Black Musics in Latin America and the Caribbean, Latino Music in the U.S., Ethnomusicology, and the Afro-Latin Music Ensemble.

Note: This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin?s Live Webcasts page.

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Saya Woolfalk, Artist's Talk: "World Builder"

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April 30, 20154:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Saya Woolfalk (Japan, 1979) is a New York based artist who uses science fiction and fantasy to re-imagine the world in multiple dimensions. She will deliver an artist's talk, "World Builder" in connection with the exhibition Past Futures: Science Fiction, Space Travel, and Postwar Art of the Americas

Woolfalk earned her B.A. in visual art and economics at Brown University and her M.F.A. in sculpture at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2004. She moved to New York in 2006 to participate in the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program, and was an artist-in-residence at the Studio Museum in Harlem from 2007-2008. 

She has exhibited at PS1/MoMA; Deitch Projects; Contemporary Art Museum, Houston; Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati; the Brooklyn Museum; Asian Art Museum, CA, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the Studio Museum in Harlem; the Frist Center for the Visual Arts; The Yerba Buena Center; The Newark Museum; Third Streaming; MCA San Diego; MoCA Taipei; and Performa 09; and has been written about in the New Yorker, Sculpture Magazine, Artforum, ARTNews, The New York Times, Huffington Post and on Art21's blog.  

Her first solo museum show The Empathics was on view at the Montclair Art Museum in the Fall of 2012. Her second solo museum exhibition ChimaTEK Life Products is currently on view at the Chrysler Museum of Art. She is currently working on a new commission for the Seattle Art Museum (Summer 2015), and is a 2014 recipient of a NYFA grant in Digital/Electronic Arts. She is represented by  Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects, NYC. 

Free and open to the public.

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Exhibition Opening: Visual Art Majors, Class of 2015

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April 30, 20157:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Edwards Arts Center, Miscellaneous

Work by visual art majors from the Class of 2015 will be on display throughout the Edwards Arts Center. Come celebrate the culmination of the hard work and talent of this year's visual art seniors. 


Refreshments will be provided. Hope to see you there!

Artwork: Mikaela Cooper '14

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Panel Discussion: "What is Boko Haram? Why Should We Care?"

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April 30, 20157:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Boko Haram is a radical Sunni Islamic sect, originally calling itself Jama'atu Ahlis Sunnar Lidda'awati Wal-Jihad, "people committed to the propagation of the Prophet's teachings and jihad." The group's more widely known name of Boko Haram means "Western education is sin." While initially non-violent and preaching a doctrine of withdrawal from what they perceived as a corrupt Nigerian state, they now increasingly engage in confrontation and deadly attacks on a wide range of targets.

Join us for an informative panel discussion among professors with professors from Bowdoin and University of Massachusetts, Boston. 

  • Ericka Albaugh, Assistant Professor of Government (Bowdoin). She teaches courses on Africa, language politics, development and state-building. She has researched in Cameroon, Senegal, and Ghana, and her more recent explorations focus on violence and language spread in West Africa more broadly.

  • Daren Kew, Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Conflict Resolution, Human Security, and Global Governance in the McCormack Graduate School, and Executive Director of the Center for Peace, Democracy, and Development at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. He has researched and consulted on the prevention of conflicts in Nigeria and elsewhere, highlighting in particular the role of religious civil society groups in promoting peace and democratization.

  • Scott MacEachern, Professor of Anthropology (Bowdoin). He has directed archaeological research projects in different countries in Africa and North America, but much of his research since the mid-1980s has taken place around the Mandara Mountains of northern Cameroon and Nigeria. His main research interests are in state formation processes in Africa, the archaeological studty of ethnicity and social boundaries, and African and global historical genetics.

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Bowdoin Chorus and Mozart Mentors Orchestra with Conductor Anthony Antolini '63

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April 30, 20157:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Studzinski Recital Hall, Kanbar Auditorium

Bowdoin Chorus and Mozart Mentors Orchestra will perform J.S. Bach's St. John Passion in German with conductor Anthony Antolini '63. Soloists include Erin Chenard, soprano; Joelle Morris, contralto; David Myers, tenor; John David Adams, bass; and Jerry LiaBraaten, bass.?

Mozart Mentors Orchestra was founded in 2010 as an ensemble that would accompany the Bowdoin Chorus, Down East Singers and, occasionally, the Lincoln Festival Chorus. The concept involves local string teachers who invite their most promising students to play along side them.?

Anthony Antolini graduated from Bowdoin College and holds graduate degrees in music and Slavic Studies from Stanford University. He joined the Bowdoin Music Department faculty in 1992 after teaching at Cabrillo College in Santa Cruz County, California. His specialty is Russian choral music. In 1988 he was awarded a "distinguished alumni" medal by Moscow State University for his performances of Rachmaninoff's "Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom."

Note: This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin?s Live Webcasts page.

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Bishop Yvette Flunder: "Reconciling Spirituality and Sexuality - Growing the Radically Inclusive Church"

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May 1, 201512:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Bishop Yvette Flunder discusses the idea that trying to establish a relationship with a God that barely tolerates you but cannot truly accept and certainly will never celebrate you can do incredible damage to ones self esteem. She examines the tortured historical and theological view that suggests that some people are just flawed or born to be the underclass and should never expect to be on God's 'A list', and how that has been the convenient method used to hold women, immigrants, the poor and LGBT people in chains of self-depreciation. 

Flunder is Founder and pastor of the City of Refuge United Church of Christ in Oakland, California, and presiding bishop of the Fellowship of Affirming Ministries. She is also an ordained minister of the United Church of Christ and a graduate of the Ministry Studies and Master of Arts programs at the Pacific School of Religion, Berkeley, California. She received a Doctor of Ministry degree from San Francisco Theological Seminary in San Anselmo, California. Her Doctor of Ministry project provided a framework for her work in the AIDS and transgender communities and for her activism in marriage equality.

Free and open to the public.

Sponsored by Africana Studies, Gay & Lesbian Studies, the Office of Religious and Spiritual Life, the Resource Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity, and the department of Religion.

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Bowdoin Chorus and Mozart Mentors Orchestra with Conductor Anthony Antolini '63

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May 1, 20157:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Studzinski Recital Hall, Kanbar Auditorium

Bowdoin Chorus and Mozart Mentors Orchestra will perform J.S. Bach's St. John Passion in German with conductor Anthony Antolini '63. Soloists include Erin Chenard, soprano; Joelle Morris, contralto; David Myers, tenor; John David Adams, bass; and Jerry LiaBraaten, bass. 

Mozart Mentors Orchestra was founded in 2010 as an ensemble that would accompany the Bowdoin Chorus, Down East Singers and, occasionally, the Lincoln Festival Chorus. The concept involves local string teachers who invite their most promising students to play along side them. 

Anthony Antolini graduated from Bowdoin College and holds graduate degrees in music and Slavic Studies from Stanford University. He joined the Bowdoin Music Department faculty in 1992 after teaching at Cabrillo College in Santa Cruz County, California. His specialty is Russian choral music. In 1988 he was awarded a "distinguished alumni" medal by Moscow State University for his performances of Rachmaninoff's "Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom."

Note: This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin?s Live Webcasts page.

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Bowdoin Chamber Choir with Conductors Robert K. Greenlee and Benjamin Haile '15

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May 2, 20153:00 PM – 4:30 PM
Bowdoin Chapel, Chapel

Robert K. Greenlee will conduct the Bowdoin Chamber Choir in a program of American spirituals, as well as music of the Netherlands, French Switzerland, and France, highlighting Gabriel Faure' and Lili Boulanger. Benjamin Haile '15 will conduct Faure's Messe Basse, and George Lopez will accompany on organ and piano. 

Greenlee is the director of the Bowdoin Chamber Choir, which has performed with the Portland Symphony and at ACDA and SCI conferences and festivals. He teaches courses in choral and instrumental conducting, choral literature, music theory and history, and in addition to choral music he performs drumming and vocal music of Africa, Latin America, and West Asia. 

Haile is a member of Bowdoin's Meddiebempsters, the third oldest collegiate a capella group in the nation. The 'Men in Blue' blend jazz standards, college classics, and modern songs, entertaining in New England at colleges and other venues every year.

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Bowdoin Chamber Choir with Conductors Robert K. Greenlee and Benjamin Haile '15

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May 3, 20153:00 PM – 4:30 PM
Bowdoin Chapel, Chapel

Robert K. Greenlee will conduct the Bowdoin Chamber Choir in a program of American spirituals, as well as music of the Netherlands, French Switzerland, and France, highlighting Gabriel Faure' and Lili Boulanger. Benjamin Haile '15 will conduct Faure's Messe Basse, and George Lopez will accompany on organ and piano. 

Greenlee is the director of the Bowdoin Chamber Choir, which has performed with the Portland Symphony and at ACDA and SCI conferences and festivals. He teaches courses in choral and instrumental conducting, choral literature, music theory and history, and in addition to choral music he performs drumming and vocal music of Africa, Latin America, and West Asia. 

Haile is a member of Bowdoin's Meddiebempsters, the third oldest collegiate a capella group in the nation. The 'Men in Blue' blend jazz standards, college classics, and modern songs, entertaining in New England at colleges and other venues every year.

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Film Screening and Discussion with Wang Jiuliang and Shu-Chin Tsui: "Plastic China"

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May 4, 20157:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

The waste that we produce each day gets tossed away and quickly disappears from our view. But where does it go? Is it recycled properly as we hope?  

Plastic China is a story about how plastic waste from all around the world, including the United States, ends up in China. It is because of this plastic waste that water is no longer clean, air is no longer fresh, and food is no longer safe in many areas of the vast country. People living in these polluted areas experience elevated rates of disease and mortality. This film reveals the shocking degree to which we all play a part in this problem; the connection among people around the world grows ever closer, and China is in fact not that far from home. 

Film screening (30 minutes) followed by a question and answer session with the filmmaker and Bowdoin's Shu-chin Tsui, professor of Asian studies and cinema studies. 

Wang Jiang graduated from the Communication University of China and worked for several years as a freelance photographer. He is currently a visiting scholar and artist-in-residence at the University of California, Berkeley. 

Shu-chin Tsui earned her Ph.D. in cinema and culture studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She is currently teaching 'Ecocinima: China's Ecological and Environmental Crisis.' 

Sponsored by the Asian Studies Program, the Environmental Studies Program, and Cinema Studies.

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Photographer Abelardo Morell: on "A Mind of Winter"

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May 5, 20154:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Abelardo Morell '71, H '97, gives lecture about his latest photographic project, completed in Maine during the winter of 2015. His exhibition of new photographs represents his first prolonged engagement in the state since his graduation from Bowdoin in 1977 and his first creative response to winter and the theme of climate change.


Morell is an internationally-known photographer whose recent retrospective toured throughout the United States. Presented in conjunction with A Mind of Winter: Photographs by Abelardo Morell.

Join us for a reception in the Museum Pavilion with Abe Morell immediately following at 5:30 p.m.

RSVPs are requested, but not required. You may RSVP at https://amindofwinter.eventbrite.com or email artmuseumevents@bowdoin.edu.

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Community Lecture Series with Alan Caron: "Growing Maine's Next Economy"

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May 7, 201512:30 PM – 1:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Alan Caron is the president of Envision Maine, a nonpartisan organization dedicated to creating sustainable prosperity through the growth of entrepreneurship and innovation that promotes Maine's next economy. He is also a provocative columnist for the Portland Press Herald, partner in the Caron & Egan Consulting Group, and co-author of the upcoming book, Growing Maine's Next Economy. 

He will speak to the transformative ideas, best practice strategies, and policies that he believes will create prosperity for all Maine people.
David Vail, Adams-Catlin Professor of Economics Emeritus, will respond to Caron's proposals. 

Arrive at noon with a bag lunch. Beverages and cookies provided. Lecture starts at 12:30 p.m.

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Visual Art Department Open House

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May 8, 20155:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Edwards Arts Center, Miscellaneous

Work by visual art majors from the Class of 2015 will be on display throughout the Edwards Arts Center. Come celebrate the culmination of the hard work and talent of this year's visual art seniors. 

Refreshments will be provided. Hope to see you there!

Artwork: Joanna Gromadzki '14

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