Alumni

Studying how our brain helps us navigate through space in Stanford’s Neuroscience Graduate Program, Isabel Low ’13

Studying how our brain helps us navigate through space in Stanford’s Neuroscience Graduate Program, Isabel Low ’13
October 16, 2017 01:56pm

My time in the Neuroscience major taught me to read critically, rigorously question scientific dogma, and communicate my science to others. I use these skills almost every day.

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Isabel Low is currently a second year PhD student in Stanford's Neuroscience Graduate Program, studying how our brain helps us navigate through space. Before that, she worked as a research technician and lab manager at Harvard University and Boston Children's Hospital. Isabel graduated from Bowdoin with a double major in Neuroscience and Creative
Writing.

How did your Neuroscience degree from Bowdoin prepare you for your
current career?

My Neuroscience degree from Bowdoin was the best preparation I could have had for my current trajectory. In studying at Bowdoin, I developed a love for research science and learned basic laboratory techniques. Even more importantly, my time in the Neuroscience major taught me to read critically, rigorously question scientific dogma, and communicate my science to others. I use these skills almost every day.

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Developing statistical methods for understanding large-scale biological and artificial (AI) neural circuits, Alex Williams ’12

Developing statistical methods for understanding large-scale biological and artificial (AI) neural circuits, Alex Williams ’12
October 13, 2017 02:45pm

My time at Bowdoin taught me to be very detail-oriented and critical of my own ideas. This granted me a lot of independence and confidence to develop my own research projects later on.

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Alex is currently pursuing a PhD in Neuroscience at Stanford University. His research and graduate coursework have been largely interdisciplinary, in particular with the Engineering and Computer Science departments. Alex's current projects aim to develop statistical methods for understanding large-scale biological neural circuits as well as artificial neural networks used in artificial intelligence and machine learning. Before coming to Stanford, he worked at the Salk Institute, UC San Diego, and Brandeis University on smaller-scale computational models of single neurons and small circuits.

How did your Neuroscience degree from Bowdoin prepare you for your current career?

My time at Bowdoin taught me to be very detail-oriented and critical of my own ideas. This granted me a lot of independence and confidence to develop my own research projects later on.

How did your Neuroscience education influence your career trajectory?

Patsy Dickinson introduced me to Eve Marder as an undergraduate, and this directly led to my first job after graduating (in Eve's lab at Brandeis). Working with Eve turned out to be the perfect next step to prepare me for a PhD. I think all students interested in applying to
grad school should seriously consider working for a couple years first.

What are your future plans?

I am going to keep researching topics in computational neuroscience and machine learning. I may do in this in academia as a postdoc/professor, or as a researcher in industry.

What advice would you give to current or future Neuroscience majors?

Do at least one summer of research at Bowdoin. Do at least one summer internship/research position outside of Bowdoin.

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Resident in internal medicine and future resident of Harvard’s Neurology Residency Program, Anirudh Sreekrishnan, ’12

Resident in internal medicine and future resident of Harvard’s Neurology Residency Program, Anirudh Sreekrishnan, ’12
October 13, 2017 02:23pm

The exposure to research in a basic science lab and mentoring from all the professors were all crucial in helping me pursue this career.

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After graduating from Bowdoin, Anirudh spent three months in D.C. working as a congressional intern in the U.S. House of Representatives, specifically addressing mental health and HIV issues. He then started medical school at Yale University, where he spent an additional year
getting a Masters in Health Science (M.H.S.). Anirudh's specific research in medical school was understanding functional and cognitive recovery of stroke patients. He is currently in his first year of medical residency in internal medicine and will be joining the Harvard Neurology Residency Program (Brigham Women’s and Mass General Hospitals) next year.

How did your Neuroscience education influence your career trajectory?
In a lot of ways my neuroscience degree at Bowdoin was my first step into the world of neurology. My time at Bowdoin instilled the fundamental basic science teaching that prepared me not only for medical school, but also a medical residency in neurology. The exposure to research in a basic science lab and mentoring from all the professors were all crucial in helping me pursue this career.

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