Spring 2012 Courses

061. Fundamentals of Music
Mary Hunter M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
For the entry-level student. Explores the fundamental elements of music—form, harmony, melody, pitch, rhythm, texture, timbre—and teaches basic skills in reading and writing Western music notation for the purposes of reading, analyzing, and creating musical works.
071. Bird Song, Human Song
Robert Greenlee T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
A study of avian and human melodies, including the mechanics, anatomy, neurobiology, and endocrinology of sound production and recognition in birds and humans; ecological and evolutionary contexts of song; and interspecific influences on songs. Songs and calls, identified aurally and through sonograms and basic music notation, are used to inspire new musical compositions that explore the musical relationships between humans and birds. Required field trips, research projects, and anatomy laboratories. Although no music or biology experience is required or presumed, students should have a strong interest in learning about birds and music. Weekly one-hour lab.
105. Introduction to Audio Recording Techniques
Christopher Watkinson T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Explores the history of audio recording technology as it pertains to music, aesthetic function of recording technique, modern applications of multitrack recording, and digital editing of sound created and captured in the acoustic arena. Topics include the physics of sound, microphone design and function, audio mixing console topology, dynamic and modulation audio processors, studio design and construction, principles of analog to digital (ADA) conversion, and artistic choice as an engineer. Students will create their own mix of music recorded during class time.
130. History of Rock Music
Vineet Shende M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
Explores how a marginalized and racially segregated genre (the so called “Race Music” of the 1920s) has developed into the world’s most dominant popular music tradition. The history of rock music and its descendants (including punk, metal, funk, electronica, and hip-hop) will be explored through changes in five often interrelated filters: race relations, commerce, politics, technology, and, of course, music.
131. Sound, Self, and Society: Music and Everyday Life
Michael Quintero T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
Explores the role of music and sound as social practice, political catalyst, market commodity, site of nostalgia, environment, identity tool, and technology of the self. Enables students to write about sound and music. Addresses music as mood manipulation; noise pollution; musical taste and identity; gendered music; “urban tribes” and musical subcultures; amateur vs. specialist music-making; the music industry; music as power; notions of authenticity; sound technology. Case studies may include gym, study, and slow jam playlists; karaoke; the racial politics of crossover; Guitar Hero; music conservatories; mood music and “cock rock”; barbershop quartets; amateur brass bands; suburban heavy metal; Muzak; advertising jingles; car and café soundscapes.
131. Sound, Self, and Society: Music and Everyday Life
Michael Quintero T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
Explores the role of music and sound as social practice, political catalyst, market commodity, site of nostalgia, environment, identity tool, and technology of the self. Enables students to write about sound and music. Addresses music as mood manipulation; noise pollution; musical taste and identity; gendered music; “urban tribes” and musical subcultures; amateur vs. specialist music-making; the music industry; music as power; notions of authenticity; sound technology. Case studies may include gym, study, and slow jam playlists; karaoke; the racial politics of crossover; Guitar Hero; music conservatories; mood music and “cock rock”; barbershop quartets; amateur brass bands; suburban heavy metal; Muzak; advertising jingles; car and café soundscapes.
132. The Beethoven Symphonies
James McCalla M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
A chronological study of the nine symphonies as examples of Beethoven’s compositional styles, of the classical style in general, and as a musical expression of the Enlightenment world view. Emphasis is placed on the formal structure of the works, the progressive development of Beethoven’s musical thinking, and the changing musical world around him.
203. Tonal Analysis
Mary Hunter M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
Through a survey of music from Bach to Chopin, the student learns to recognize the basic processes and forms of tonal music, to read a score fluently, and to identify chords and modulations.
227. Protest Music
Judith Casselberry T 6:30 - 9:25
Focuses on the ways black people have experienced twentieth-century events. Examines social, economic, and political catalysts for processes of protest music production across genres including gospel, blues, folk, soul, funk, rock, reggae, and rap. Analysis of musical and extra- musical elements’ style, form, production, lyrics, intent, reception, commodification, mass-media, and the Internet. Explores ways in which people experience, identify, and propose solutions to poverty, segregation, oppressive working conditions, incarceration, sexual exploitation, violence, and war.
243. Introduction to Composition
Vineet Shende M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
An introduction to the art of combining the elements of melody, harmony, rhythm, form, and orchestration to create cohesive and engaging music. Students learn techniques for generating and developing musical ideas through exercises and four main compositional assignments: a work for solo instrument, a theme and variations for solo instrument and piano, a song for voice and piano, and a multi-movement work for three to five instruments. Students also learn ways to discuss and critique their own and one another’s work. Ends with a concert of student compositions.
269. Middle Eastern Ensemble
The Department M 6:30 - 8:25
Meets once a week on Monday evenings, and performs pieces from the Arabic, Turkish, Armenian, and Greek traditions. Coached by oud player Amos Libby and percussionist Eric La Perna, the group does one performance per semester and often collaborates with the Bowdoin Belly Dance Club. No percussion experience is required to join; students who already play string or wind instruments are invited to participate.
271. Chamber Choir
Robert Greenlee M 4:15 - 5:35, T 4:15 - 5:35, W 4:15 - 5:35, TH 4:15 - 5:35
An auditioned group of about thirty student singers. Repertory ranges widely, from Renaissance sacred music to American contemporary music and folk music of the world. The choir performs at festivals and society meetings in the U.S. (American Choral Directors Association and Society of Composers), and it tours abroad during some spring breaks. Recent trips have taken the ensemble to Germany, Ireland, England, Chile, and Canada. Monday through Thursday late afternoons must be reserved, but the choir usually rehearses only three of those days.
273. Chorus
Anthony Antolini TH 7:00 - 9:25, SU 7:00 - 8:55
A choral ensemble composed of students, faculty, staff, and community members. Entrance is by audition. This ensemble has performed at the regional convention of the American Choral Directors Association in Baltimore. The chorus has toured throughout New England, New York, Washington, D.C., and Montreal. In summer 2008, the Chorus traveled to Greece. Recent performances have included Rachmaninoff’s Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, Mozart’s Solemn Vespers, Mendelssohn’s Elijah, and Vaughan Williams’ Dona nobis pacem. Rehearsals are Thursday and Sunday evenings.
275. Concert Band
John Morneau T 6:30 - 8:25, TH 6:30 - 8:25
A performance ensemble open to all students with wind and percussion experience that performs several major concerts each year on campus, along with performances at campus events and ceremonies. The BCCB performs a variety of literature from the finest of the wind band repertoire to light classics, show tunes and marches. Students have been featured as soloists and conductors, and student compositions have been premiered by the ensemble. Rehearsals are Tuesday and Thursday evenings.
277. Ensemble Performance
Roland Vazquez
The Orchestra, offered only in the fall, is an auditioned group of students from Bowdoin and Bates Colleges that rehearses and performs every fall on both campuses. Recent repertoire includes large-scale symphonic works, such as Robert Schumann’s Symphony No. 1, concertos with guest artists, and overtures. Rehearsals are Sunday evenings. Chamber Ensembles occur both semesters but may be taken for credit only in the spring. They range from sonata groups through string quartets and brass and wind quintets to jazz combos. They are coached by professional freelance musicians and by Bowdoin faculty, and perform in a variety of venues on and off campus. Coaches and faculty also often play with the groups. Auditions take place at the beginning of the spring semester. Rehearsals are arranged to suit the players’ and coach’s schedules.
281. World Music Ensemble: Afro-Latin Music
Michael Quintero W 6:30 - 9:25
Performs the musical forms of black populations in Latin America and the Caribbean, with particular emphasis on the marimba and drumming traditions of Afro-Colombians. May include also include Afro-Cuban, Afro-Peruvian, Afro-Puerto Rican, Afro-Dominican, and other musics. Students learn and perform multiple instruments, drumming, singing, and dance, culminating in a concert every semester. Occasional texts and audiovisual materials supplement musical learning by offering cultural and aesthetic contextualization. Rehearsals are Wednesday evenings.
283. Jazz Ensembles
Stephen Grover
Groups of four to six students, formed by audition, and performing both modern and classic standards, plus some original compositions by students and faculty. They perform one concert a semester on campus, and appear occasionally in other venues. Rehearsals are arranged to suit the players’ and coach’s schedules.
285. Individual Performance Studies
The Department
286. Individual Performance Studies
The Department
287. Individual Performance Studies
The Department
288. Individual Performance Studies
The Department
289. Individual Performance Studies
The Department
354. Charles Ives, John Adams, and American Music(s)
James McCalla M 10:00 - 11:25, W 10:00 - 11:25
Charles Ives (1874-1954) and John Adams (b. 1947) are often depicted as “quintessentially” American composers: Ives as a rugged, if quirky, New England individualist and Transcendentalist who took American music from nineteenth-century imitations of European music to a burly, challenging modernism drawn from many sources, classical and vernacular; and Adams as a pre-eminent postmodernist who engages a very wide spectrum of contemporary performers and listeners with the immediacy and equally broad-based elements of his music. Such characterizations are both correct and incomplete: examines the works of these composers in their relations to “classical” procedures (forms, genres, compositional techniques), their “American” profiles, the range of their compositions, and what they have to say to their contemporaries and to us today.
385. Advanced Individual Performance Studies
The Department
386. Advanced Individual Performance Studies
The Department
387. Advanced Individual Performance Studies
The Department