Fall 2013 Courses

  • Please note that for the 2013-14 academic year, official course numbers are now four digits. This page only shows the older three-digit course numbers. If you need to see both the old and the new numbers, consult the College Catalogue.
  • The College Catalogue has a class finder tool to search for courses by title, instructor, department, and more.
  • Login to Blackboard. Instructional materials are available on a course-by-course basis.

061 (c-VPA)
FUNDAMENTALS OF MUSIC
T  1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
Greenlee, Robert K
Gibson-101 Tillotson Room
Course with separate lab(s).
 Lab Section 1F  2:30 - 3:55
Greenlee, Robert K
Gibson-101 Tillotson Room
For the entry-level student. Explores the fundamental elements of music—form, harmony, melody, pitch, rhythm, texture, timbre—and teaches basic skills in reading and writing Western music notation for the purposes of reading, analyzing, and creating musical works.

101 (c-VPA)
INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC THEORY
M  1:00 - 2:25, W  1:00 - 2:25
Judd, Cristle Collins
Gibson-101 Tillotson Room
Course with separate lab(s).
 Lab Section 1F  1:30 - 2:25
Judd, Cristle Collins
Gibson-101 Tillotson Room
Designed for students with some beginning experience in music theory and an ability to read music. Covers scales, keys, modes, intervals, and basic tonal harmony.

102 (c-VPA)
INTRO TO CLASSICAL MUSIC
T  11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
Hunter, Mary K
Gibson-101 Tillotson Room
Introduction to some major works and central issues in the canon of Western music, from the middle ages up to the present day. Includes some concert attendance and in-class demonstrations.

131 (c)
MUSIC AND EVERYDAY LIFE
T  10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
McMullen, Tracy M
Gibson-101 Tillotson Room
Explores the role of music and sound as social practice, political catalyst, market commodity, site of nostalgia, environment regulator, identity tool, and technology of the self. Enables students to communicate about sound and music. Addresses music in relation to: mood manipulation; signification and "noise"; taste and identity; race, class, gender, and sexuality codes; repetition and form; "urban tribes" and subcultures; the cult of the expert; economics and politics; power; authenticity; technology; and multinationalism. Musical genres will be primarily within American popular music. Case studies may include: gym, study, road trip, and party playlists; karaoke; tribute bands; music in film; music revivals; "cock rock"; the gendered nature of instruments; suburban punk; Muzak; advertising jingles; and Starbucks.

141 (c-ESD,VPA)
AMER INDIAN MUSIC TRADITIONS
T  2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
Taffe Reed, Susan M
Gibson-101 Tillotson Room
An introductory course exposing students to the diversity of American Indian musical traditions in Eastern North America, and demonstrating the importance of music in the lives of Native people, particularly those in Maine and the Northeastern United States. Through assigned readings and listenings, class discussion, events, quizzes, writing a final paper, and delivering a presentation, students engage in critical analysis of issues that impact Native music, such as the complexity of categorizing music, stereotypes, and music revitalization.

202 (c-VPA)
SONGWRITING & SONG ANALYSIS
M  1:30 - 2:25, W  1:30 - 2:25, F  1:30 - 2:25
Shende, Vineet A
Gibson-206
An intensive project-oriented course in which students will learn skills such as melodic and rhythmic writing, arranging, studio production, text-setting, and basic chromatic harmony, and how those elements combine to affect listeners on an emotional level. Repertoire studied will largely be chosen by students, but will also include songs by the Beatles, various Motown artists, Joni Mitchell, Prince, and Radiohead. Small-group and individual lab sessions scheduled separately. Not open to students who have credit for Music 151.

218 (c-VPA)
INTRO TO ELECTRONIC MUSIC
M  11:30 - 12:55, W  11:30 - 12:55
Mauceri, Frank
Gibson-6 Electronic Studio
No First Years.
Examination of the history and techniques of electronic and computer music. Topics include compositional aesthetics, recording technology, digital and analog synthesis, sampling, MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface), and computer-assisted composition. Ends with a concert of student compositions.

251 (c)
REBEL YELL: PUNK MUSIC
T  1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
McMullen, Tracy M
Gibson-206
No First Years. 
Explores the significance of punk music from the 1970s to today. Addresses punk music in relation to: transnational identity; the individual in late modernity; music vs. noise; sound and meaning; "selling out"; youth culture; subculture; "genre trouble"; music and fashion; rebellion and insurrection; the abject; constructions of the body and disease; and race, class, gender, and sexuality codes. Enables students to communicate about sound and music. Bands/artists discussed may include: The Bags, The Germs, Nervous Gender, The Sex Pistols, The Bad Brains, Nirvana, The Runaways, Patti Smith, Television, X-Ray Spex, and The Clash.

269 (c)
MIDDLE EASTERN ENSEMBLE
M  6:30 - 8:25
Shende, Vineet A
Studzinski-202
Half-credit course.
Offered Credit/D/Fail. 
Meets once a week on Monday evenings, and performs pieces from the Arabic, Turkish, Armenian, and Greek traditions. Coached by oud player Amos Libby and percussionist Eric La Perna, the group does one performance per semester and often collaborates with the Bowdoin Belly Dance Club. No experience is required to join; students have the option of singing, learning new percussion instruments, or playing an instrument with which they are already familiar.

271 (c)
CHAMBER CHOIR
M  4:15 - 5:35, T  4:15 - 5:35, W  4:15 - 5:35, TH 4:15 - 5:35
Greenlee, Robert K
Gibson-101 Tillotson Room
See Music Dept about auditions.
Half-credit course.
Offered Credit/D/Fail. 
An auditioned group of about thirty-five student singers. Repertory ranges widely, from Renaissance music to American contemporary music and folk music of the world. The choir performs at festivals and society meetings in the U.S. (American Choral Directors Association and Society of Composers), and it tours abroad during some spring breaks. Recent trips have taken the ensemble to Germany, Ireland, England, Chile, Hungary, and Slovakia. Monday through Thursday late afternoons must be reserved, but the choir usually rehearses only three of those days.

273 (c)
CHORUS
TH 7:00 - 8:55, SU 7:00 - 9:25
Antolini, Anthony F
Gibson-101 Tillotson Room
See Music Dept about auditions.
Half-credit course.
Offered Credit/D/Fail.
A choral ensemble composed of students, faculty, staff, and community members. Entrance is by audition. This ensemble has performed at the regional convention of the American Choral Directors Association in Baltimore. The chorus has toured throughout New England, New York, Washington, D.C., and Montreal. In summer 2008, the Chorus traveled to Greece. Recent performances have included Rachmaninoff's Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, Mozart's Solemn Vespers, Jenkins' Requiem, and Vaughan Williams' Dona nobis pacem. Rehearsals are Thursday and Sunday evenings.

275 (c)
CONCERT BAND
T  6:30 - 8:25, TH 6:30 - 8:25
Morneau, John P
Studzinski-100
Half-credit course.
Offered Credit/D/Fail. 
An ensemble open to all students with wind and percussion experience that performs several major concerts each year on campus, along with performances at campus events and ceremonies. Repertoire consists of a variety of literature, from the finest of the wind band repertoire to light classics, show tunes and marches. Students have been featured as soloists and conductors, and student compositions have been premiered by the ensemble. Rehearsals are Tuesday and Thursday evenings.

277 (c)
ENSEMBLE PERFORMANCE
Lopez, George S
Studzinski-100
See Music Dept about auditions.
Half-credit course.
Offered Credit/D/Fail.
Ensemble Performance is for instrumentalists who play orchestral instruments or piano and would like to play in chamber ensembles and the chamber orchestra. Participants (except pianists) must reserve Sunday evenings from 7:00 p.m. until 8:30 p.m., and chamber ensemble rehearsals and coachings will be scheduled on an individual basis. All students must audition for ensemble performance. One-half credit per semester can be earned if one participates in both the orchestra and a chamber ensemble; with permission of the director, some students may be allowed to play in only one or the other ensemble on a non-credit basis.
 
281 (c)
AFRO-LATIN MUSIC ENSEMBLE
W  6:30 - 9:25
Wingfield, Michael J
Gibson-101 Tillotson Room
Half-credit course.
Offered Credit/D/Fail.
Performs the musical forms of black populations in Latin America and the Caribbean, with particular emphasis on the marimba and drumming traditions of Afro-Colombians. May include also include Afro-Cuban, Afro-Peruvian, Afro-Puerto Rican, Afro-Dominican, and other musics. Students learn and perform multiple instruments, drumming, singing, and dance, culminating in a concert every semester. Occasional texts and audiovisual materials supplement musical learning by offering cultural and aesthetic contextualization. Rehearsals are Monday and Wednesday evenings.

283 (c)
JAZZ ENSEMBLES
Mauceri, Frank
Gibson-10
See Music Dept about auditions.
Half-credit course.
Offered Credit/D/Fail.
Time TBA.
Groups of four to six students, formed by audition, and performing both modern and classic standards, plus some original compositions by students and faculty. They perform one concert a semester on campus, and appear occasionally in other venues. Rehearsals are arranged to suit the players' and coach's schedules.
 
285 (c)
INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE STUDIES
The Department
Permission required.
Half-credit course.
Time TBA.
 
286 (c)
INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE STUDIES
The Department
Permission required.
Half-credit course.
Time TBA. 

287 (c)
INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE STUDIES
The Department
Permission required.
Half-credit course.
Time TBA. 

288 (c)
INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE STUDIES
The Department
Permission required.
Half-credit course.
Time TBA.

289 (c)
INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE STUDIES
The Department
Permission required.
Half-credit course.
Time TBA.

356 (c)
COPLAND AND SHOSTAKOVICH
M  10:00 - 11:25, W  10:00 - 11:25
Hunter, Mary K
Gibson-206
No First Years.
Aaron Copland and Dmitri Shostakovich were near contemporaries; they both stood slightly to the side of modernist music as it grew out of the Second Viennese School, and music by both of them is taken to have national and political significance. Copland is an icon of the "American" values of freedom and openness, and Shostakovich is known chiefly for his complex relation to oppressive Soviet regimes. Examines the biographies of the two men, analyzes some of their most important works, and discusses their place in Modernist aesthetics.

385 (c-VPA)
ADV INDIVIDUAL PERFORM STUDIES
The Department
Permission required.

386 (c-VPA)
ADV INDIVIDUAL PERFORM STUDIES
The Department
Permission required.

387 (c-VPA)
ADV INDIVIDUAL PERFORM STUDIES
The Department
Permission required.