Named in honor of Common Good Award recipient and founder of Safe Passage, Hanley Denning '92, the Denning Summer Fellowship through the Forest Foundation is designed for students who already have a foundation in community engagement and are seeking an in-depth experience working on a public issue of interest related to their academic major. A stipend of $5000 provides funding for students to pursue in-depth work on an issue through placement at an organization while laying the groundwork for independent community-engaged research.

Charlotte Borden '19

Charlotte Borden '19

Charlotte (major) worked at AS220 Youth in Providence, RI. The focus of her work there was creating a printed compilation of writing and visual art produced in AS220 programming at RI’s Juvenile Detention Center throughout their twenty year presence there. Her work included research in the organization’s archives, online, and through individuals who have been at the organization throughout its life, including her direct supervisor. Additionally, she assisted in teaching painting as well as planning for AS220’s Foo Fest, a large-scale fundraising event where the youth summer employees performed and sold their visual work. Charlotte was able to gain experience at an organization whose mission closely matched her own intersectional, professional interests.
"This past summer I was able to gain experience at a nonprofit based in creativity and social justice, my two professional foci. I ended up working with the archives, making a printed compilation of work produced in AS220 programming at RI’s Juvenile Detention Center throughout their twenty year presence there. My supervisor had been a youth member, working consistently with the organization for close to fifteen years. I was able to observe how the organization was currently running, research its history, and hear first hand how the organization has changed and grown throughout its life."

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Ellinor Heywood '19

Ellinor Heywood '19

Ellinor (Government & Legal Studies and Hispanic Studies) worked with two sexual assault support and prevention organizations—Sexual Assault Support Services of Midcoast Maine (SASSMM) in Brunswick, ME and Sexual Assault Response Services of Southern Maine (SARSSM) in Portland, ME. With the former, she has been helping to curate their older adult programs and materials. Her research has also been focused on how nursing home staff can handle sexual assault disclosures made by residents with cognitive disabilities such as dementia. Conversely, her work with SARSSM has been focused on creating workshops for survivors within the Latino Community. The intent of these workshops has been to hear how Latino survivors have navigated different systems—legal, law enforcement, DHHS, immigration services, etc.—and how they believe these services could be improved for Spanish-speaking immigrants in the Portland area.
"Being able to work with two sexual assault support agencies has been an invaluable experience. It has been inspiring to see the dedication each member brings to supporting survivors of sexual violence through empathy and advocacy. From accompanying individuals to court to trauma-informed yoga sessions, SASSMM and SARSSM are actively creating spaces where survivors can feel safe and believed."

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Darlene Ineza '19

Darlene Ineza '19

This summer, Darlene (major) has been working under the mentorship of Dr. Kathleen Fairfield at the Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE) at Maine Medical Center. Her main project was a research study on the strengths and improvement opportunities in healthcare for immigrants in Portland and Lewiston. This consisted of interviews with community stakeholders and a medical chart review at Maine Medical center. She summarized her findings in a report for community stakeholders. She also developed an in-depth presentation on the history of refugee crises for incoming Maine Med residents and students. Finally, she assisted in assembling a literature review on the concept of Area Deprivation and cancer incidence for a Lung Cancer Research Project.
"During these past few months, I have learned an incredible amount about Maine, Immigration and the U.S Healthcare system. I have gotten to know so many inspiring and hard-working individuals on the Portland public health scene and at Maine Medical Center. This summer was truly rewarding both personally and academically, and solidified my passions for health equity and medicine even more than before."

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Ripley Mayfield '19

Ripley Mayfield '19

At Wolfe’s Neck Center for Agriculture and the Environment, Ripley (Environmental Studies and Hispanic Studies) worked mostly with the fruit and vegetable production team, helping out in the communication and education departments occasionally. A day-to-day schedule included seeding, weeding, harvesting, writing the weekly CSA newsletter, and leading volunteer groups in the field. She was also involved in the farm’s charitable giving initiatives and made frequent visits to local food pantries to donate produce. She had the opportunity to apply her GIS skills by creating maps of the orchards and perennial production plot, which will be posted on signage for guests to see. Her time at Wolfe’s Neck provided a great introduction to the world of agricultural non-profits.
"Working at Wolfe’s Neck offered me an agricultural learning experience that went far beyond being a farmhand – my supervisor taught me about plant science, financial processes, and leadership skills along the way. I’m so grateful to have connected with both my community and my food and look forward to volunteering with WNC whenever possible."

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Brandon Morande '19

Brandon Morande '19

As a Denning Fellow, Brandon (Latin American Studies and Sociology) interned with MaineHealth Access to Care, supporting two programs: Homeless Health Partners (HHP, Portland) and CarePartners (Damariscotta). Conducting interim social work with HHP, the Fellow helped individuals experiencing or at risk of homelessness connect with Primary Care Providers, complete applications for Maine Care (Medicaid), request prescriptions, and receive other case management services. At CarePartners, Brandon facilitated enrollment of low-income consumers under Maine Care Expansion and other financial assistance programs. Through these positions, the Fellow gained exposure to navigating Medicaid, Medicare, and Affordable Care Act coverage, as well as advocating for vulnerable patients.
"Assisting individuals experiencing homelessness and housing insecurity with accessing primary care has reaffirmed my deepest conviction that health equity requires empowering consumers. Although our health system remains unacceptably convoluted, when provided the social and financial support necessary to navigate services, people will fight for and achieve their right to quality care."

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Judy Olivares '19

Judy Olivares '19

Judy (Sociology and Gender, Sexuality, & Women Studies) worked with Child Protective Services (CPS) in San Antonio, Texas. She primarily worked with Kinship Care, a Unit in CPS that focuses on the concerns of children being placed with relatives and/or family friends. She focused on the different resources Kinship offers to families and children that qualify for them. Judy experienced how caseworkers interact with families on a one-on-one basis and learned to document family visits. She also had the opportunity to observe forensic interviews, court hearings, and group family meetings. She shadowed different caseworkers from different units such as investigators, Conservatorship Specialist workers, and Kinship workers, which allowed her to develop an in-depth understand of how CPS becomes involved in families and children’s lives. Her time at CPS has motivated her to continue engaging in further work related to child welfare in the foster care system.
"My experience at CPS was very rewarding because I was able to help families and children adjust to CPS being involved in their life. Despite having to see children be taken away from their families, I learned a lot about how CPS gets involved with those families. The CPS workers I shadowed taught me how to become an engaged caseworker with children and their families. I am very excited to work there again next year."

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Jae Min Yoo '19

Jae Min Yoo '19

This summer, Jae-Min (Government & Legal Studies and Religion) interned at the Cumberland County Food Security Council and the Somali Bantu Community Association. At CCFSC, she was primarily involved with their report on the Portland Public Schools’ food system, investigating the successes and shortcomings of the federal nutrition programs and charitable food programs in place at Portland Public Schools. Jae-Min also helped finish another report, "Closing the Hunger Gap with Local Food," and participated in gleaning from local farms. Jae-Min spent one day a week with SBCA's community farming program, where she developed materials for record-keeping and worked in the greenhouse and fields.
"I began my internship with a basic understanding of the concept of food security and a new interest in non-profits. Now, having had the opportunity to learn about numerous agencies that work to increase food security in Maine, I have gained a better awareness of the dedication and challenges inherent to working at small, growing non-profits."

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Lindsey Duff '18

Lindsey (Psychology) worked for an educational nonprofit called LEAP for Education in Salem, MA this summer. Though she was involved in multiple projects throughout the summer, her main focus was planning and implementing the curriculum for a summer program for high school English Language Learners. Her contributions included designing curriculum tools that promoted multicultural awareness and evaluating the program from a multicultural lens at the end of the summer.
"My experience at LEAP this summer was eye-opening: despite having spent a lot of time working with youth since getting to college, before this summer I had never worked with high school students. The incredible staff at LEAP were an inspirational example for me as a developed an entirely new skill set aimed at working with adolescents to engage in the community and improve their English skills."

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Scout Gregerson '18

Scout (Neuroscience) helped Oasis Free Clinics, a provider of free health care to uninsured adults in Southern Midcoast Maine, conduct a community needs assessment. She carried out interviews with partner organizations to better understand the key health and service needs of those with low-income and identify future areas of collaboration. In the fall, Scout will help draft a final report of the whole community needs assessment with recommendations for the Board of Directors.
"Working with Oasis has opened my eyes to the challenge and necessity of meeting the health care needs for all, especially those who are underserved. This summer has reinforced my conviction that access to quality health care with dignity must be considered a fundamental right."

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Zachary Hebert '18

Zachary (Sociology) spent his summer working with the Merrymeeting Food Council. Zach assisted the Merrymeeting Food Council with a range of projects from youth engagement to market analysis. Zach’s main project was working to expand the Merrymeeting Gleaners, a project of the Merrymeeting Food Council that works to distribute additional produce from farms to low-income community members in the MidCoast Maine area. Throughout the summer Zach has helped the Gleaners expand to several new recipient organizations, provide service in six new towns, and assisted in a 20% increase in gleaned produce for the month of July.
"Being involved with the Merrymeeting Food Council has allowed me to gain a comprehensive understanding of the intricacies of a local food system through administrative coordination and hands-on experience. With great significance for my post-graduation plans, this internship has provided me with the confidence in knowing that I can independently coordinate food assistance programs from the produce still in the ground, all the way to the mouths of the individuals who need it the most."

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Kevin Hernandez '18

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Michelle Jeong '18

Michelle (Sociology) spent her summer working with The Opportunity Alliance: Cooking Matters and Midcoast Maine Community Action: WIC. At Cooking Matters, Michelle’s main project was to plan and co-teach a 6-week cooking class to teenagers and adults in Westbrook, Maine. At the WIC office, Michelle had the opportunity to sit-in with clients and assist clients with the process of recertification. At both sites, Michelle focused on nutrition and the issue of food insecurity in Maine. Through her fellowship, Michelle was able to extend community outreach on behalf of Cooking Matters, establish potential new sites for cooking classes, and discuss what constitutes a healthy lifestyle with participants.
"My experience this summer helped me realize the vast amount of resources Maine has to overcome food insecurity. There are so many different projects going on simultaneously, like the Good Food Bus and gleaning at farms. Although these project are scattered across Maine, I learned that they have found ways to collaborate with one another in some shape or form. It was amazing to see local resources being pooled together by community members in order to support their neighbors."

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Sarah Kelley '18

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Jude Marx '18

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Liam Nicoll '18

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Lili Ramos '18

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Daisy Wislar '18

Daisy (Gender, Sexuality, & Womens Studies and Sociology) spent her summer working with the Equal Rights Center in Washington, DC. She worked within the Accessibility and Disability Rights program, where her main focus was on researching the intersection of disability, LGBT identities, sexuality, and sexual assault. In her capacity as Accessibility Rights Intern at the ERC, she also created numerous guides for testing the accessibility of public spaces, as well as trained ERC's corporate partners on disability rights and disability etiquette.
"My time as a Denning Fellow showed me what is like to work on the frontlines protecting the rights and freedoms of people with disabilities. It demonstrated the urgency of civil rights work in our current political climate, and re-affirmed my passion for disability/LGBT justice."

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Meghan Bellerose '17

Meghan Bellerose '17

Meghan (Biochemistry and Sociology) spent her summer at Save the Children in Washington, D.C., working on the International School Health and Nutrition team. Her primary projects were to produce country reports and total reach statistics for the 2015 SHN Program Update, a document shared with donors and NGO partners to highlight existing program areas, and to communicate with in-country staff to collect and summarize health education approaches from 43 countries. Meghan also had the opportunity to learn about global maternal and child health by attending conferences hosted by a variety of non-profit and UN aid organizations.
"I've learned more about international development in 10 weeks at Save the Children than I believed possible. It was wonderful to leave the office each day feeling optimistic, inspired by the dedication and joy that SC staff put into their work, and eager to do more to advance the health and wellbeing of children and mothers around the world."

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Thomas Freeman '17

Thomas Freeman '17

Tom spent his summer doing research for Coastal Enterprise, Inc. (CEI) in Brunswick, Maine. His research focused on promoting immigration in Maine’s rural economies. In March, CEI published a report demonstrating how immigration strengthened Portland’s economy. Thomas’ research examined whether this economic boost could be replicated in rural areas of Maine and whether these areas possessed favorable conditions for successful immigration, both for the immigrants and for the current residents. I studied the job vacancies, available housing stock, and local demographic shifts of different towns and counties in Maine.
"My research at Coastal Enterprise Inc. (CEI), taught me a lot about the current and future problems facing the State of Maine. As a Mainer, I appreciated the opportunity to enhance my knowledge of the demographic, economic, and social challenges of Maine and advocate for several solutions towards these problems. I also enjoyed learning about the different divisions of CEI and working with their excellent staff."

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Julia Berkman-Hill '17

Julia Berkman-Hill '17

Julia (Sociology) spent the summer in her hometown of New Haven, CT, working with a nutrition program run on a community farm for people at risk for diet-related illnesses. Her main project was to conduct an evaluation of New Haven Farms’s youth garden and cooking program, using interviews, focus groups, and surveys. Her report is a foundation to help the program expand to reach more children and develop a curriculum with more defined goals. She will continue her research on nutrition this fall from a historical perspective, looking at the influence of the local food movement on public health initiatives.
"This summer was very meaningful for me because I got to see my hometown from a fresh perspective. Working at New Haven Farms opened my eyes to the deep roots of food security and health issues in the city, while reminding me of the importance of community and culture of eating well."

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Gillian Kramer '17

Gillian Kramer '17

This summer Gillian worked with Milestone Foundation’s Homeless Outreach and Mobile Engagement (HOME) Team to proactively support substance using homeless individuals to increase the safety of these individuals as well as that of the rest of the Portland community. She also developed a cost-benefit analysis of the work of the HOME team to show the extent of the monetary savings the HOME team provides for the Portland emergency medical system and the Portland police department, as well as the non-monetary savings the program provides for the individuals receiving support.
"I am incredibly grateful to have had the opportunity to work with an organization that is embedded with so many layers of compassion. Getting to know individuals living on the streets of Portland has also helped me better understand some of the challenges that those with substance use problems face, and has inspired my desire to pursue a career in human services."

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Shannon McCabe '17

Shannon McCabe '17

Through her work at the Merrymeeting Food Council, Shannon McCabe helped establish a farm-to-pantry gleaning initiative in Midcoast Maine. Gleaning is the collection of food that will not be sold or harvested to make sure that it does not go into the waste stream, while feeding people in need. She spent a few days a week out on the farm or at local pantries, connecting surplus food with people who need it. In just seven weeks, the group donated over 3000 pounds of fresh produce to food pantries and soup kitchens in the area, reducing food waste and food insecurity.
"My time at the Food Council allowed me to explore my interest in food systems, deepening my understanding of food insecurity. It was incredible to learn how all of the sectors of a food system interact and the innovative solutions that come together when a diverse group of people are brought to the table. I’m excited to continue this project into the academic year and thankful for the opportunity to work with such a dedicated group of people."

Read more about Shannon's project.

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Daniel Mejia '17

Daniel Mejia '17

Daniel (Sociology) spent his summer working with Maine Boys to Men. His main project identified other organizations in the United States whose work also focuses on the promotion of healthy masculinity. After thorough analysis of these groups, Daniel reported back to Maine Boys to Men as to how they can improve their Reducing Sexual Violence Program (RSVP), extend community outreach, and further collaborate with other organizations to end gender-based violence in Southern Maine. Daniel hopes to continue his study of healthy masculinity through an independent study that focuses on emotional capacity and fluency among Bowdoin males.
"My experience this summer has left a large impression on me on the importance of teaching healthy masculinity to young boys and girls. Seeing the amazing team at Maine Boys to Men create real impact in the lives of young Mainers has demonstrated how direct workshops within communities can create sustainable changes for a better future."

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Chrissy Rujiraorchai '17

Chrissy Rujiraorchai '17

Over the summer, I worked with Safe Passage's development office. The non-profit was started by Bowdoin alum, Hanley Denning, to provide a holistic education for the poorest, most at-risk students in the Guatemala City dump. At Safe Passage, my work allowed me to develop a better understanding of cross-cultural non-profits. Through this my summer research investigated how language and culture influences the processing, expression of, and recovery from grief and crisis, as well as how these things might impact the provision of services, regulation, and policy in working with multicultural communities. While working with Safe Passage, I focused on developing self-sustainable programs and materials for recruiting and cultivating engagement with the organization. I worked primarily on program design, analysis, strategy, and implementation.

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Lily Woodward '16

Lily Woodward '16

Lily’s research this summer looked at the relationship between immigrants and refugees – “New Mainers” – and the law. By working with two Portland-based non-profits – Catholic Charities Maine and the Immigrant Legal Advocacy Project (ILAP) – she gained insight into the path of a newly arrived refugee, witnessed the frustrations of accessing legal services as an immigrant, and worked directly with clients to overcome the cultural and language barriers inherent to these processes. Lily hopes to turn the knowledge gained through this fellowship into long-term research that will facilitate cross-cultural understanding and lead to the creation of better policies in Maine.
"The experiences I have had through the Denning fellowship have been invaluable in shaping my future academic and career goals. With the institutional support and mentorship of the McKeen Center, I was able to work with two incredible non-profits doing timely and important work alongside Maine’s immigrant and refugee communities. Both Catholic Charities and ILAP regularly pushed me out of my comfort zone and in doing so made me a more capable and confident person, for which I am incredibly grateful."

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Kelsey Freeman '16

Kelsey Freeman '16

During her internship at the Native American Youth and Family Center (NAYA) in Portland, Oregon, Kelsey Freeman '16 (Government & Legal Studies) spent the majority of the summer directly working with Native youth— developing culturally relevant curriculum for NAYA’s summer school programming and teaching classes during NAYA’s Summer Camp Rise for 2nd through 8th graders.

"This experience has been extremely valuable in exposing me to an innovative non-profit, giving me direct teaching experience, helping me learn more about Portland’s Native community, and taking me one step further in refining my career goals."

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Calvin Henry '16

Calvin Henry '16

Calvin Henry '16 (Psychology) spent his summer at Bath Housing Authority conducting a group of voluntary, in-person surveys offered to all BHA residents. The topics of these surveys included personal health, services and programming, community background and engagement, family financial security and skills, and satisfaction with Bath Housing. He analyzed the data, summarized the results, and made recommendations based on key findings and themes.

"My fellowship at BHA allowed me to learn about the people who live in public housing and the challenges they face. Conversations with residents showed me ways in which external circumstances interact with personal variables to shape the quality of life for individuals. I enjoyed listening to many kind and interesting people, and I am grateful for increased awareness of the impact of complex personal stories on housing choices and access."

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James Jelin '16

James Jelin '16

During his time at the Maine Center for Economic Policy, James Jelin’s '16 (Mathematics) primary projects were calculating the living wage across the state, determining how many low income children access preventative care, writing blog posts, and updating MECEP’s communications plan. He gained an in-depth understanding of the State’s controversial budget negotiations while also attending meetings with a variety of nonprofit advocacy organizations.

"My short ten weeks at MECEP have taught me more about policy than I thought possible. From studying and advocating for the recently updated overtime regulations to writing about the nuances of the Affordable Care Act, the support of their intelligent and delightful team has given me the skills to understand the intricacies of government and the confidence to trust my own research in the coming years."

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Bridget Kranz

Bridget Kranz

Bridget Kranz '16 (Visual Arts) spent her summer fellowship with ArtVan. Her job spanned three different areas of their nonprofit work: helping to organize and clean their storage space and materials, serving as a support staff at their art therapy program sites, and interviewing participants to gather feedback to better assess the needs of the community. Bridget hopes to continue her work with ArtVan through an independent study in the spring, based around a public art installation.

"I haven’t drawn in my sketchbook for about two months now, afraid of producing something bad. Meanwhile, I asked Hunter, one of our participants, if he had drawn anything in his sketchbook since last week. He had done a colored pencil rendition of a wooded scene, filling a whole blank page! ArtVan has taught me to be open: to open myself up to others, and to be thoughtful and patient when they open themselves up to me."

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Ali Ragan '16

Ali Ragan '16

A summer internship at Sexual Assault Support Services of Midcoast Maine afforded Ali Ragan '16 (English) the opportunity to work both independently and in collaboration with other staff to revamp SASSMM’s Facebook presence, produce an updated PSA to demystify how SASSMM’s 24-hour hotline works, and review SASSMM’s resource guide. The staff created a welcoming environment and provided a wealth of knowledge around the issue of sexual violence prevention and advocacy for its survivors.

"To be a part of such inspiring and important work has fueled my passion for sexual violence prevention and advocacy for its survivors. Whether completing work in client services, contributing to SASSMM’s community outreach efforts, or accompanying any of SASSMM’s awesome staff to their educational presentations, each day was a huge learning experience."

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Alex Thomas '16

Alex Thomas '16

Alex Thomas '16 (Biochemistry and Government & Legal Studies) spent the summer at the Maine Migrant Health Program. His primary project was organizing and conducting a community health needs assessment among aquaculture, commercial fishing, and seafood processing workers to see what other populations would benefit from MMHP’s model of care and services. Alex also spent time at MMHP’s mobile clinics and surveying broccoli cutters in Aroostook County. Interacting with these farmworkers and learning more about their life and work was a highlight of his fellowship experience.

"My experience this summer has left an indelible impression on me of Maine’s migrant farmworkers. Getting to meet these amazing individuals and see where they live and work has opened my eyes to the realities of farm work in America, and made me appreciate the blueberries and other produce at the grocery store so much more. Working alongside this extraordinary staff to provide health services to this often invisible population has been an opportunity that I will not soon forget."

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Michelle Johnson '15

Michelle Johnson '15

"This summer working with Save the Children on their domestic public policy team, I got to look at issues of child poverty from a macro level. While in Washington, DC, I attended events about early childhood interventions that I normally only get to read email summaries about. While learning about public policy, I worked on projects to change laws on disaster preparation for schools and child care. As the unaccompanied minors border crisis unfolded, I got to do research and attend hearings to help figure out how children could best be served. The whole experience taught me how change can be made on a large scale."

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Marko Peraica'15

Marko Peraica'15

"My experience at the Maine Volunteer Lawyers Project has allowed me to work with the people of Maine in a variety of different ways. I had the opportunity to speak with clients in a personal setting, which gave me the chance to connect with individuals from the community in a way I had not been able to before."

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Olivia Reed '15

Olivia Reed '15

"Last summer, I worked at the Political Asylum/Immigration Representation Project in Boston. Over the course of two months, I worked alongside attorneys, asylum-seekers and detainees on various tasks, including compiling asylum applications, preparing clients for asylum interviews, visiting detention centers to deliver “Know Your Rights” presentations, and translating legal documents. This experienced furthered my understanding of immigration law and allowed me to put faces to the struggle of navigating our current immigration system, solidifying my desire to pursue a career in immigrant rights."

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Emily Weinberger '15

Emily Weinberger '15

"This opportunity to work alongside law professors and student attorneys at Cumberland Legal Aid has opened my eyes to the complexities of our country’s legal system. Being involved with both the Refugee/Human Rights and Juvenile Clinics has allowed me to explore the diversity that exists in Maine and be a part of innovative policy work. My summer at the clinic has solidified my interest in pursuing a career in psychology and law."

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Kaylee Wolfe '15

Kaylee Wolfe '15

"This summer I’ve been fortunate enough to work with two incredible organizations: Planned Parenthood and Speak About It. Through diverse projects such as organizing a film screening, marketing through social media, and revamping a guide to leading discussions about sexual violence with college students, I have learned something new every day at work. I know that the skills, knowledge, and contacts I have gained this summer will serve me well for years to come."

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Tracie Goldsmith '14

"I will be able to use my pursuit of a History major and Biology minor at Bowdoin to provide the background information necessary to gain more from my summer experiences regarding public health and disease as well as the historical reasons and trends which help explain why some populations have been and continue to be more vulnerable than others and why there is no "quick fix" to the problems of poverty. More specifically, this summer will greatly influence my life after Bowdoin as the knowledge I gain here will be useful in both a career in public health and in law."

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Hannah Wurgaft '14

Hannah Wurgaft '14

"Through my internship at Cumberland Legal Aid this summer, I have been exposed to a variety of legal issues affecting Maine communities. The experiences I’ve had filing paperwork with disabled minors, compiling a manual for asylum applicants, and organizing donations for a prison library have encouraged me to pursue my interest in the legal field. I am grateful to have worked alongside the students and professors at the clinic."

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Taylor Cochran

"From this experience, I hope to improve upon my facilitation and advocacy skills. I also anticipate improving my understanding of non-profit organization and management, and I would love the opportunity to make connections across non-profits serving at-risk youth in the Portland area. Upon returning to Bowdoin, intend to continue facilitating and building safe, supportive, and affirming spaces on campus through my involvement with Residential Life, Peer Health, and the Resource Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity. After having worked with Preble Street of Portland, ME, in the past, I have also considered the possibility of carrying on with LGBTQ and inclusiveness outreach in their Teen Center and Lighthouse Shelter. As a psychology major, I intend to pursue a master’s degree in social work and a master’s degree in counseling psychology with the hopes of continuing to serve at-risk youth, especially those in the LGBTQ community."

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Melanie Gaynes

Melanie Gaynes

"Through my internship I hope to gain a better understanding of community and state level public health programs and how such programs can be used to address health disparities. This knowledge will be a starting point for me during the upcoming school year as I begin my honors project on healthcare in West Virginia. Though West Virginia and Maine have different geographies, economies, and environmental health issues, both are rural states with low, but increasing diversity. The similarities between the states mean that some of the information I learn this summer could be of use in looking at West Virginia. This internship will give me the chance to learn more about the public health field and will help me as I move into my senior year and decide the kind of career path I want to follow after college."

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Laurel Curtis '14

Laurel Curtis '14

"Through my work with the Brunswick Farmers' Market, I have discovered connections between the seemingly unrelated worlds of local, sustainable agriculture and hunger prevention. These connections have given me a new way of looking at issues of food equity and poverty abatement, in particular, searching for solutions that support local economies by providing paths out of poverty."

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Kristen Rogers '12

Kristen Rogers '12

"The Forest Foundation fellowship allowed me to reflect on my past experiences; academic, occupational, and personal, and synthesize the interests to create my own personalized fellowship that integrated many of my interests."

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