Location: Bowdoin / Mathematics / Courses / Spring 2010

Mathematics

Spring 2010

 
050. Quantitative Reasoning
Eric Gaze T  1:00 - 2:25
TH 1:00 - 2:25
Searles-216
Explores the ways and means by which we communicate with numbers; the every day math we encounter on a regular basis. The fundamental quantitative skill set is covered in depth providing a firm foundation for further coursework in mathematics and the sciences. Topics include ratios, rates, percentages, units, descriptive statistics, linear and exponential modeling, correlation, logic, probability. This is a lab/project based course using Excel, emphasizing conceptual understanding and application. Reading of current newspaper articles and exercises involving personal finance are incorporated to place the mathematics in real world context.

161. Differential Calculus
Mohammad Tajdari M  11:30 - 12:25
W  11:30 - 12:25
F  11:30 - 12:25
Searles-213
Functions, including the trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions; the derivative and the rules for differentiation; the anti-derivative; applications of the derivative and the anti-derivative. Four to five hours of class meetings and computer laboratory sessions per week, on average. Open to students who have taken at least three years of mathematics in secondary school.

165. Biostatistics
Rosemary Roberts T  11:30 - 12:55
TH 11:30 - 12:55
Searles-113
An introduction to the statistical methods used in the life sciences. Emphasizes conceptual understanding and includes topics from exploratory data analysis, the planning and design of experiments, probability, and statistical inference. One and two sample t-procedures and their non-parametric analogs, one-way ANOVA, simple linear regression, goodness of fit tests, and the chi-square test for independence are discussed. Four to five hours of class meetings and computer laboratory sessions per week, on average. Not open to students who have credit for Mathematics 155, Psychology 252, or Economics 257.

171. Integral Calculus
Leon Harkleroad T  2:30 - 4:25
TH 2:30 - 4:25
Searles-113
The definite integral; the Fundamental theorems; improper integrals; applications of the definite integral; differential equations; and approximations including Taylor polynomials and Fourier series. Four to five hours of class meetings and computer laboratory sessions per week, on average.

171. Integral Calculus
Michael King T  10:00 - 11:25
TH 10:00 - 11:25
Searles-217
The definite integral; the Fundamental theorems; improper integrals; applications of the definite integral; differential equations; and approximations including Taylor polynomials and Fourier series. Four to five hours of class meetings and computer laboratory sessions per week, on average.

181. Multivariate Calculus
Adam Levy M  10:30 - 11:25
W  10:30 - 11:25
F  10:30 - 11:25
Searles-217
Multivariate calculus in two and three dimensions. Vectors and curves in two and three dimensions; partial and directional derivatives; the gradient; the chain rule in higher dimensions; double and triple integration; polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates; line integration; conservative vector fields; and Green’s theorem. Four to five hours of class meetings and computer laboratory sessions per week, on average.

181. Multivariate Calculus
Thomas Pietraho T  10:00 - 11:25
TH 10:00 - 11:25
Searles-215
Multivariate calculus in two and three dimensions. Vectors and curves in two and three dimensions; partial and directional derivatives; the gradient; the chain rule in higher dimensions; double and triple integration; polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates; line integration; conservative vector fields; and Green’s theorem. Four to five hours of class meetings and computer laboratory sessions per week, on average.

200. Introduction ot Mathematical Reasoning
Jennifer Taback M  9:30 - 10:25
W  9:30 - 10:25
F  9:30 - 10:25
Searles-217
An introduction to logical deductive reasoning, mathematical proof, and the fundamental concepts of higher mathematics. Specific topics include set theory, induction, infinite sets, permutations, and combinations. An active, guided discovery classroom format.

201. Linear Algebra
Michael King T  1:00 - 2:25
TH 1:00 - 2:25
Searles-217
Topics include vectors, matrices, vector spaces, inner product spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and quadratic forms. Applications to linear equations, discrete dynamical systems, Markov chains, least-squares approximation, and Fourier series. Formerly Mathematics 222.

224. Applied Mathematics: Ordinary Differential Equations
Mohammad Tajdari M  9:30 - 10:25
W  9:30 - 10:25
F  9:30 - 10:25
Searles-213
A study of some of the ordinary differential equations that model a variety of systems in the natural and social sciences. Classical methods for solving differential equations with an emphasis on modern, qualitative techniques for studying the behavior of solutions to differential equations. Applications to the analysis of a broad set of topics, including population dynamics, competitive economic markets, and design flaws. Computer software is used as an important tool, but no prior programming background is assumed.

227. Elemenetary Topics in Topology
Noah Kieserman M  2:30 - 3:25
W  2:30 - 3:25
F  2:30 - 3:25
Searles-113
Topology studies properties of geometric objects that do not change when the object is deformed. The course covers knot theory, surfaces, and other elementary areas of topology.

244. Numberical Methods
Adam Levy M  1:00 - 2:25
W  1:00 - 2:25
Searles-213
An introduction to the theory and application of numerical analysis. Topics include approximation theory, numerical integration and differentiation, iterative methods for solving equations, and numerical analysis of differential equations.

252. Mathematical Cryptography
Jennifer Taback M  11:30 - 12:55
W  11:30 - 12:55
Searles-217
Classical and modern methods of cryptography and cryptanalysis. Topics include public key cryptography and the RSA encryption algorithm, factoring techniques, and recently proposed cryptosystems based on group theory and graph theory.

263. Introduction to Analysis
Thomas Pietraho T  1:00 - 2:25
TH 1:00 - 2:25
Searles-213
Emphasizes proof and develops the rudiments of mathematical analysis. Topics include an introduction to the theory of sets and topology of metric spaces, sequences and series, continuity, differentiability, and the theory of Riemann integration. Additional topics may be chosen as time permits.

265. Statistics
Rosemary Roberts T  2:30 - 3:55
TH 2:30 - 3:55
Searles-213
An introduction to the fundamentals of mathematical statistics. General topics include likelihood methods, point and interval estimation, and tests of significance. Applications include inference about binomial, Poisson, and exponential models, frequency data, and analysis of normal measurements.

302. Advanced Topics in Algebra
Stephen Fisk T  10:00 - 11:25
TH 10:00 - 11:25
Searles-113
Introduction to rings and fields. Vector spaces over arbitrary fields. Additional topics may include Galois theory, algebraic number theory, finite fields, and symmetric functions