Dance of Two Cultures

In collaboration with the campus and surrounding communities, the Latin American Studies Program supports concerts, theme dinners, film screenings, symposia, service-learning projects, debates and teach-ins organized by various student organizations, faculty, campus divisions, and neighborhood associations. Every semester speakers who are experts in a field related to the courses being offered or who are directly involved with social, political, academic or cultural activities in Latin America are invited to campus. Our students are offered numerous opportunities to engage with Latino or Latin American communities in many other ways as well.

Fall 2014 Events

Decimas Project

Decimas Project

October 1, 2014 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Studzinski Recital Hall, Kanbar Auditorium

"Las Decimas del Amargue & Other Songs of Love" is a touring project by the band Raquel Z. Rivera & Ojos de Sofia that through performances, artist talks, and workshops educates audiences on the contemporary relevance of the centuries-old Ibero-Afro-American poetic form known as decimas, and celebrates its connection to Jibaro Music, Boleros, Palos and Bachata.

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The Alfred E Golz Memorial Lecture: "Democracy at the Roots: Understanding Haiti's Political Culture" - Streamed LIVE

The Alfred E Golz Memorial Lecture: "Democracy at the Roots: Understanding Haiti's Political Culture" - Streamed LIVE

October 23, 2014 7:30 PM  – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Laurent Dubois is the Marcello Lotti Professor of Romance Studies and History at Duke University. He is the author of several books on the history and culture of the French Caribbean and Atlantic World, including Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution (2004), A Colony of Citizens: Revolution and Slave Emancipation in the French Caribbean, 1787-1804 (2004), and his latest work, Haiti: The Aftershocks of History (2012). He also has an interest in the relationship between sports and politics. In 2010 he published Soccer Empire: The World Cup and the Future of France. He is currently preparing a book manuscript on the history of the banjo, for which he has received several awards, including a Mellon New Directions Fellowship, and fellowships from the National Humanities Center and the Guggenheim Foundation. Professor Dubois also served as head historical consultant for a PBS documentary on the Haitian Revolution, which premiered in 2009.

Professor Dubois's upcoming Golz lecture, "Democracy at the Roots: Understanding Haiti's Political Culture," explores three intertwined legacies of the Haitian Revolution on political thought and practice in the country: the largely hostile reaction to it outside the country, the formation of new political institutions and structures, and -- most importantly -- the creation of a new set of cultural, social, and economic structures that Jean Casimir has called the “counter-plantation” system. He identifies both the main currents and critical counter-currents within each of these legacies, calling attention to the aspects of the latter legacies that seem to him to be the most valuable and worth comprehending and nourishing in constructing new Haitian futures.

This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin's Live Webcasts page.

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Erika Helgin, "It is Not a Crime to Kill the Infidel: Protestants, Catholics, and Religious Violence in Vargas' Brazil." A Case Study

Erika Helgin, "It is Not a Crime to Kill the Infidel: Protestants, Catholics, and Religious Violence in Vargas' Brazil." A Case Study

November 11, 2014 4:00 PM  – 5:00 PM
Edward Pols House, Conference Room

In the 1930s and 40s, violent confrontations erupted between Protestants and Catholics in the rural region of Brazil known as the sertão. Pastors were threatened and attacked, churches were burned, and, in the most extreme cases, individuals lost their lives. This talk, presented by Erika Helgen (Ph.D. candidate, Yale, Department of History), examines the nature and evolution of this religious violence, as well as its relationship to broader national struggles over the future of Brazilian religious identity.

Free and open to the Bowdoin Community. Sponsored by the Latin American Studies Program with support from the History and Religion Departments.

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Michael Birenbaum Quintero presents: "Teofilio Potes and the Counter-History of Black Politics in Colombia"

Michael Birenbaum Quintero presents: "Teofilio Potes and the Counter-History of Black Politics in Colombia"

November 12, 2014 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

FACULTY SEMINAR SERIES

Michael Birenbaum Quintero
, Assistant Professor of Music is the featured speaker.  The title of his talk is: "Teofilio Potes and the Counter-History of Black Politics in Colombia."

Open to faculty and staff.
Buffet lunch $3, or bring your own lunch.

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'Sleep Dealer': A Screening and Discussion with Filmmaker Alex Rivera

'Sleep Dealer': A Screening and Discussion with Filmmaker Alex Rivera

December 3, 2014 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Filmmaker and Digital Media Artist Alex Rivera visits Bowdoin to screen and discuss his award-winning film, Sleep Dealer

Rivera’s work has been telling new, urgent and visually adventurous Latino stories. His first feature film, Sleep Dealer, a science fiction tale set on the U.S./Mexico border, won multiple awards at the Sundance Film Festival and the Berlin Film Festival. His film was also screened as part of ‘New Directors/New Films’ at the Museum of Modern Art and Lincoln Center and had a commercial release in the U.S., France, and Japan. 

Sleep Dealer tells the story of Memo Cruz (Luis Fernando Peña), a young man in near future Mexico. When is family falls victim to a misguided drone attack he finds himself with no option but to head north, towards the U.S./Mexico border. But migrants can not cross this new world border – it’s been sealed off. Instead, Memo ends up in a strange digital factory in Mexico where he connects his body to a robot in America. 

Sleep Dealer carries embedded in it profound political and economic critiques about issues as diverse as labor and immigration, technology and ethics, globalization, and the environment. 

Sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, Sociology and Anthropology, Romance Languages, Latin American Studies, Cinema Studies, the Office of the Dean of Multicultural Student Affairs, and the McKeen Center for the Common Good.

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Afro-Latin Ensemble

Afro-Latin Ensemble

December 3, 2014 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Studzinski Recital Hall, Kanbar Auditorium

Under the direction of Michael Birenbaum Quintero, Bowdoin's Afro-Latin Music Ensemble will present a concert highlighting the scintillating rhythms and cultural richness of the descendants of Africans in Latin America, including music from Colombia, Cuba, and Peru.

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