Courses: Spring 2013

137. CuBop, Up-Rock, Boogaloo, and Banda: Latinos Making Music in the United States
Michael Quintero M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Gibson-101 Tillotson Room
Surveys the musical styles of Latinos in the United States. Discusses the role of these musics in articulating race, class, gender, and sexual identities for U.S. Latinos, their circulation along migration routes, their role in identity politics and ethnic marketing, their commercial crossover to Anglo audiences, and Latin/o contributions to jazz, funk, doo-wop, disco, and hip-hop. Case studies may include Mexican-American/Chicano, Puerto Rican/Nuyorican, and Cuban-American musics; Latin music in golden age Hollywood; Latin dance crazes from mambo to the Macarena; rock en español; the early 2000s boom of Latin artists like Shakira, Enrique Iglesias, and Jennifer Lopez; reggaetón, race politics, and the creation of the “Hurban” market; and the transnational Latin music industries of Los Angeles, New York, and Miami.

202. Demons and Deliverance in the Atlantic World
Laura Premack M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Adams-114
Seminar. Examines beliefs and practices having to do with evil spirits, demons, and the Devil in Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, the United States, and Western Europe. The primary focus is exorcism. What is it? How has it been practiced? By whom? Why? The approach to the subject is historical, transnational and diasporic; we examine changes and continuities across the Atlantic over the past 500 years, beginning with cultural encounters between Africans, native Americans, and Europeans during the colonial period and continuing up through the reverse missionization and the new African diaspora of the present day. Readings will include works of ethnography, anthropology, theology, history, personal narrative, and fiction.

205. Advanced Spanish
Maria Baez T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Sills-111
The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

205. Advanced Spanish
Carolyne Wolfenzon Niego T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Sills-205
The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

209. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
Elena Cueto-Asin M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Sills-109
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.

209. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
Margaret Boyle T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Sills-205
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.

210. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Nadia Celis M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 Sills-109
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.

213. Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Francophone Literature
Hanetha Vete-Congolo M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 Sills-205
Introduces students to the literary tradition of the contemporary Francophone world. Focuses on major authors and literary movements in historical and cultural context.

223. Religion and Social Transformation in South America
Krista Van Vleet T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Adams-114
Explores the ways various religious beliefs and practices have intersected at particular historical moments, using the Andean region as an exemplary case. Examples from pre-Columbian and Inca, Spanish colonial, and contemporary republican periods highlight the continuities and transformations in local and global religious institutions and the significance of religion to political-economic and social relationships. Uses scholarly readings in anthropology, archaeology, and history as well as novels and films to introduce anthropological theories of religion and globalization; analyze local cosmologies, rituals, and conceptions of the sacred alongside institutionalized global religions such as Catholicism and evangelical Protestanism; social, economic, and political processes.

243. Indigenous Identity and Politics in Latin America, 1492 to Present
Elizabeth Shesko M 8:00 - 9:25, W 8:00 - 9:25 Adams-406
Examines the construction of indigenous identity in Latin America from the conquest to the present, focusing on how indigenous and European cultures mixed and affected one another, albeit under profoundly unequal conditions. Analyzes how authenticity, heritage, and tradition are set up against forms of progress, belonging, and exclusion. Topics include religion, sexuality, legal frameworks governing indigenous peoples, movements for autonomy, and the recent effects of migration, transnational networks, international law, and NGOs. Considers the case studies of Mexico, Guatemala, Peru, and Bolivia through primary sources and recent scholarship.

245. Global Pentecostalism: The Roots and Routes of Twentieth Century Christianity
Laura Premack T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Adams-114
Seminar. Pentecostalism is a form of Christianity centered on the gifts of the Holy Spirit. Pentecostals speak in tongues, heal, prophesize, see visions, and exorcise demons. By many accounts, Pentecostalism is the fastest growing religion in the world. While its population is difficult to count, current estimates place the world’s total number of Pentecostals at close to 600 million. The vast majority of these Pentecostals are concentrated in the global South: Latin America, Africa, and Asia. The widespread assumption is that Pentecostalism started in the United States in 1906 -- and was taken to the rest of the world by missionaries. Challenging this assumption and exploring other interpretive possibilities is at the center of this course, which will focus on charting the origins and expressions of the global Pentecostal movement with emphasis on its African-American roots and its contemporary African and Latin American expressions.

277. Children and Youth in Global Perspective
Krista Van Vleet M 10:00 - 11:25, W 10:00 - 11:25 Adams-202
Explores research on children as a window onto issues of individual agency and social, political, and economic inequality in the contemporary world. Children move between families, communities, and nations; claim belonging to divergent communities; create distinct identities; and navigate hierarchies. Highlights the circulation of children as structured by broad relationships of power. Forefronts youth as social actors. Considers culturally specific notions of childhood and methodological and ethical implications of research with children. Topics include adoption, migration, human trafficking, child labor, tourism, and social movements in the Americas, Asia, Oceania, and/or Africa.

318. A Journey around Macondo: García Márquez and His Contemporaries
Nadia Celis M 6:30 - 9:25 The Hazelton Room (Kanbar 109)
Studies the main topics, techniques, and contributions of Colombian Nobel Prize winner Gabriel García Márquez as presented in One Hundred Years of Solitude. Explores the actual locations, social, cultural, and literary trends that inspired the creation of Macondo, the so-called “village of the world” where the novel takes place, and the universal themes to which this imaginary town relates. Contemporary authors include Fuenmayor, Cepeda Samudio, and Rojas Herazo. An optional one-week study tour to Cartagena, Colombia will be held the first week of March break. There will be a fee of approximately $2000 for this optional study tour. Need-based financial aid will be available to students who receive financial aid from Bowdoin.

343. Imaginary Cities/Real Cities in Latin America
Carolyne Wolfenzon Niego M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Pols House-Conf Room
Examines the representation of urban spaces in Spanish American literature during the last six decades. While mid-twentieth-century fictional towns such as Macondo and Comala tended to emphasize exoticism, marginality, and remoteness, more recent narratives have abandoned the “magical” and tend to take place in metropolitan spaces that coincide with contemporary large cities such as Lima and Buenos Aires. The treatment of social class divisions and transgressions, territoriality, and the impact of the space on the individual experience are studied in novels, short stories, and film from the 1950s to the present. Authors include Rulfo, García Márquez, Onetti, Donoso, Vargas Llosa, Sábato, Reynoso, Ribeyro, Piñera, Gutiérrez, Bellatín, Caicedo, and Junot Díaz, among others

344. Bad Girls on Stage in Early Modern Spain and Spanish America
Margaret Boyle T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Sills-205
In both Early Modern Spain and Spanish America, the figure of the “bad girl” includes, for example, prostitutes, single women, orphans, abused wives, brainy women and back-stabbing girlfriends. Against the backdrop of the Spanish Inquisition, this course rethinks the category of the “bad girl” by examining early modern plays, chronicles and institutional manuals by authors including María de Zayas, Lope de Vega, Luís Vélez de Guevara, Sor Juana, and Bartolomé Arzáns. We will also consider how the figure is adapted by contemporary popular films in order to examine the relationships between gender, deviance, performance and rehabilitation. Taught in Spanish.