Location: Bowdoin / Latin American Studies / Courses / Spring 2012

Latin American Studies

Spring 2012

130. Introduction to the Arts of Ancient Mexico and Peru
Susan Wegner M 8:30 - 9:25, W 8:30 - 9:25, F 8:30 - 9:25
A chronological survey of the arts created by major cultures of ancient Mexico and Peru. Mesoamerican cultures studied include the Olmec, Teotihuacan, the Maya, and the Aztec up through the arrival of the Europeans. South American cultures such as Chavin, Naca, and Inca are examined. Painting, sculpture, and architecture are considered in the context of religion and society. Readings in translation include Mayan myth and chronicles of the conquest.

205. Advanced Spanish
Nadia Celis T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
The study of a variety of texts and media, together with an advanced grammar review, designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

205. Advanced Spanish
Nadia Celis T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
The study of a variety of texts and media, together with an advanced grammar review, designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

209. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
Elena Cueto-Asin M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.

209. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
Enrique Yepes T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.

210. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Carolyne Wolfenzon Niego M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.

210. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Esmeralda Ulloa T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.

213. Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Francophone Literature
Jay Ketner T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
Introduces students to the literary tradition of the contemporary Francophone world. Focuses on major authors and literary movements in historical and cultural context. Conducted in French.

229. Maya Archaeology and Ethnohistory
Leslie Shaw M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
Focuses on the Maya civilization of Central America using archaeological data and Spanish accounts of traditional Maya life at the time of conquest. Topics will include Maya adaptations to diverse tropical environments, the decipherment of Maya writing, political instability and warfare, and Maya cosmology and the continuation of these beliefs into modern times. Semester projects will be sued for intensive research into selected issues in Maya archaeology.

233. Latino Education: Family, Culture, and Schooling
Mariana Cruz T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
Examines the education of Latinos and Latinas in the US through the exploration of varying historical, political, cultural, and socio-economic contexts. As a whole, the course is organized around three major themes: family, culture, and the notion of "una buena educación" (a good education/schooling). Course materials and assignments offer a comprehensive review of theory, research, and practice in Latino education that include influential studies in the field of Latino education, statistical data-sets on demographics and educational attainment, and creative/activist cultural production by Latino/Chicano artists. This course is intended to capture the field of Latino Education at this point in time.

253. The United States and Latin America: Tempestuous Neighbors
Allen Wells T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
Seminar. Examines scholarship on the evolution of United States-Latin American relations since Independence. Topics include the Monroe Doctrine, commercial relations, interventionism, Pan Americanism, immigration, and revolutionary movements during the Cold War.

258. Latin American Revolutions
Allen Wells T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Examines revolutionary change in Latin America from a historical perspective, concentrating on four cases of attempted revolutionary change—Cuba, Chile, Nicaragua, and Guatemala. Popular images and orthodox interpretations are challenged and new propositions about these processes are tested. External and internal dimensions of each of these social movements are analyzed and each revolution is discussed in the full context of the country’s historical development.

260. Labor, Gender, and Immigration in the United States-Mexico Borderlands
Lori Flores M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
Seminar. Explores the history of the United States-Mexico borderlands through the prisms of work, gender, and movements of people. What is the definition of a “borderland” and who or what creates one, physical or imagined? What historical moments and patterns make the United States-Mexico borderlands a unique space, and how has this space shifted and changed over time? Through readings students will analyze how labor and class, articulations and notions of gender, and immigration policies and migrant flows have impacted processes of identity formation, inclusion, and exclusion for this region’s racially and ethnically diverse communities. A critical understanding of place, relations of power, historical memory, and the meanings of transnationalism are major objectives.

304. Dress and Body Politics in Latin America
Esmeralda Ulloa T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
Examines the significant role of the dressed body (both attire and the body itself) in the configuration of political discourse and national identity in Latin America. Focuses on verbal and visual representations of iconic figures such as Simón Bolívar, Pancho Villa, Rigoberta Menchú, and Evo Morales, among others. The connection of these often contradictory images to governance and collective identities explored in various contexts from the colonial period to the present. Conducted in Spanish.

317. Childhood Memories: Reflections on Self and Home in the Postcolonial Francophone Caribbean
Isabelle Choquet M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
Childhood narratives are fascinating gateways to questions on self-definitions in Francophone Caribbean societies. As they relate their childhood, writers from Martinique, Guadeloupe and Haiti tell of their ancestors’ past and of the society in which they grew up, but also of the relationship they establish as adults with their country of origin. What is home for writers from Haiti living in exile? And for writers from Martinique who feel that their cultural identity is jeopardized by their mother country? Is there a gender divide on the representation of home? Discussions based on novels, short stories and films.

329. Short Cuts: The Latin American Nouvelle
Gustavo Faveron-Patriau T 6:30 - 9:25
Focuses on Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Latin American literature through a number of masterpieces of the short novel genre. Authors may include Esteban Echevarria, Juana Manuela Gorriti, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, mario Vargas Llosa, Guillermo Cabrera Infante, and Mario Bellatin.

336. Reading Images: Intersections of Art, Film and Literature in Contemporary Latin America
Enrique Yepes T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
Considers how tensions between seeing and saying enable and/or obstruct understanding, empathy or spectatorship in case studies from the 1920s to the present. Periods include the restructuring of national identities in the 1920s, the ideological polarization after the Cuban Revolution in the 1960s, the confrontation of censorship in the 1970s and 80s, and the challenges of democracy and globalization in the 1990s and 2000s.