Location: Bowdoin / Latin American Studies / Courses / Spring 2011

Latin American Studies

Spring 2011

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130. Introduction to the Arts of Ancient Mexico and Peru
Susan Wegner M 8:30 - 9:25, W 8:30 - 9:25, F 8:30 - 9:25 VAC-Beam Classroom
A chronological survey of the arts created by major cultures of ancient Mexico and Peru. Mesoamerican cultures studied include the Olmec, Teotihuacan, the Maya, and the Aztec up through the arrival of the Europeans. South American cultures such as Chavin, Naca, and Inca are examined. Painting, sculpture, and architecture are considered in the context of religion and society. Readings in translation include Mayan myth and chronicles of the conquest.

136. Black Musics in Latin America and the Caribbean
Michael Quintero T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55 Gibson-101 Tillotson Room
An introduction to various Afro-Latin American and Afro-Caribbean musical forms and some of the issues and debates that surround them. Students examine case studies from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries. Some central themes include similarities and differences in black identity across the Americas, the relative importance of African retentions and New World innovations in the formation of these musical forms, the nature of cultural mixture with indigenous and European forms, the role of music in black religion, and musical dialogues between differently located black populations in the Americas.

205. Advanced Spanish
Carolyne Wolfenzon Niego T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Sills-205
The study of a variety of texts and media, together with an advanced grammar review, designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

209. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
Gustavo Faveron-Patriau M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 HL-311 (third floor)
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.

209. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
John Turner T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Sills-111
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.

210. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Carolyne Wolfenzon Niego T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Sills-209
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.

210. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Esmeralda Ulloa M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Sills-205
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.

213. Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Francophone Literature
Hanetha Vete-Congolo M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 Sills-205
Introduces students to the literary tradition of the contemporary Francophone world. Focuses on major authors and literary movements in historical and cultural context. Conducted in French.

230. Latinos and Latinas in the United States: Migration, Education, and Community Development
Mariana Cruz TH 6:00 - 8:55 Adams-406
Explores the experiences of Latino/as, the fastest growing minority group in the United States, from a critical lens that centers three important themes: identity, education, and politics. Questions explored include: Who are the “Latino/as” in the United States? What are the differences between Hispanics, Latino/as, Latin Americans, and Chicano/as? What are the experiences of Latino/as in United States schools? How might educators, activists, and policymakers engage these questions in order to better understand and serve Latino/as a whole? Includes a service-learning and action-research component.

254. Contemporary Argentina
Allen Wells T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Pols House-Conf Room
Seminar. Texts, novels, and films help unravel Argentine history and culture. Topics examined include the image of the gaucho and national identity; the impact of immigration; Peronism; the tango; the Dirty War; and the elusive struggle for democracy, development, and social justice.

266. History of Mexico
Allen Wells T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Searles-115
A survey of Mexican history from pre-Columbian times to the present. Topics include the evolving character of indigenous societies, the nature of the Encounter, the colonial legacy, the chaotic nineteenth century, the Mexican Revolution, and United States-Mexican relations. Contemporary problems are also addressed.

302. The Idea of Latin America
Enrique Yepes T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Sills-207
Studies how the region currently known as “Latin America” has been conceptualized from the fifteenth to the twenty-first centuries. Which geopolitical interests have shaped the idea of a geographical entity called Latin America? What does the term mean in different parts of the world? What has been the fate of alternate terms such as Abya-Yala, Indo-America, just America, Iberian-America, Spanish America, or the Indies? The analysis of various texts (in literature, history, cartography, philosophy, art, film, music, journalism) introduces intellectual and political debates around these terms, the region’s vast diversity, and whether or not it makes sense to consider it a unit. Conducted in Spanish.

304. Dress and Body Politics in Latin America
Esmeralda Ulloa M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Sills-209
Examines the significant role of the dressed body (both attire and the body itself) in the configuration of political discourse and national identity in Latin America. Focuses on verbal and visual representations of iconic figures such as Simón Bolívar, Pancho Villa, Rigoberta Menchú and Evo Morales, among others. The connection of these often contradictory images to governance and collective identities is explored in various contexts from the colonial period to the present. Conducted in Spanish.

316. New Waves in the New World: Latin American Cinema
Sarah Childress T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Sills-Smith Auditorium
Focuses on two “new waves” of film in Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, and Mexico: 1960–1970 and 2000–2010. Explores the works of Glauber Rocha, Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, Alejandro González Iñárritu, Lucrecia Martel, and others to examine how their films function as cultural, historical, political, and economic products that characterize distinct sensibilities and points of view. Also looks at the place of these films within the contexts of film history and world cinema. Attendance at weekly evening screenings is required.

332. Poetry and Social Activism in Latin America
Enrique Yepes T 6:30 - 9:25 The Hazelton Room (Kanbar 109)
Considers the aesthetic and thematic problems posed by socially committed poetry during the last one hundred years in Spanish America, from the avant-garde to the present. Authors include Mistral, Storni, Vallejo, Neruda, Guillén, Cardenal, Belli, and Parra, among others.

339. Borges and the Borgesian
Gustavo Faveron-Patriau M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Pols House-Conf Room
An examination of the Argentinian writer Jorge Luis Borges’s work, focusing not only on his short stories, poems, essays, film scripts, interviews, and cinematic adaptations, but also on the writers who had a particular influence on his work. Also studies Latin American, European, and United States writers who were later influenced by the Argentinian master. An organizing concept is Borges’s idea that “a writer creates his own precursors. His work modifies our conception of the past, as it will modify the future.”