Location: Bowdoin / Latin American Studies / Courses / Spring 2009

Latin American Studies

Spring 2009

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130. Introduction to the Arts of Ancient Mexico and Peru
Susan Wegner M 8:30 - 9:25, W 8:30 - 9:25, F 8:30 - 9:25
A chronological survey of the arts created by major cultures of ancient Mexico and Peru. Mesoamerican cultures studied include the Olmec, Teotihuacan, the Maya, and the Aztec up through the arrival of the Europeans. South American cultures such as Chavin, Naca, and Inca are examined. Painting, sculpture, and architecture are considered in the context of religion and society. Readings in translation include Mayan myth and chronicles of the conquest.

205. Advanced Spanish
Elena Cueto-Asin M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
The study of a variety of journalistic and literary texts and visual media, together with an advanced grammar review, designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

209. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
Esmeralda Ulloa M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.

209. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
Enrique Yepes T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.

210. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Carolyn Wolfenzon Niego T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.

210. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Nadia Celis T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.

256. Environment and Society in Latin America
Allen Wells M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
Examines the evolving relationship between the environment, politics, and culture in Central America and the Caribbean. Topics include the environmental impact of economic development; colonialism; the predominance of plantation monoculture, slavery, and other forms of coerced labor; and political instability.

320. Beyond Sea, Sun, and Sugar: Thinking and Writing the Hispanic Caribbean
Nadia Celis T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
A panoramic study of its 20th Century literary production, it explores the historical trends that shaped the Hispanic Caribbean culture, societies and aesthetics. Short stories, films, novels and popular music are considered in this review of the major themes and stylistic tendencies of authors from the islands, the continental Caribbean and the US-Latinos of Caribbean descent. By examining their diverse re-creations of national and regional identities, our readings will inquire on the features that make of the Caribbean a cultural unity. Topics include the effect of colonialism, slavery and the plantation economy, imperialism, dictatorships, migration and exile, and the role of culture and literature in the construction of a sense of “autonomy”. Authors include Gabriel García Márquez, Luis Rafael Sánchez, José Luis González, René Marqués, José Alcántara Almanzar, Miguel Barnet, Virgilio Piñera, Senel Paz, Karla Suárez, Ana Lydia Vega, Rosario Ferré y Junot Díaz, among others.

323. The War of the (Latin American) Worlds
Carolyn Wolfenzon Niego T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
Discusses the historical, social, and political consequences of the clash between tradition and modernity in Latin America during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as seen through novels, short stories, and film. Particular attention given to study of the ways in which the processes of modernization have caused the coexistence of divergent “worlds” within Latin American countries. Analyzes different social and political reactions to these conflictive realities, focusing on four cases: the Mexican Revolution, the Cuban Revolution, the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in Chile, and Andean insurgencies in Perú. Authors to be read may include José Martí, Simón Bolívar, Jorge Luis Borges, Roberto Bolaño, Mario Vargas Llosa, Cromwell Jara, Elena Poniatowska, Reinaldo Arenas, Juan Rulfo, and Gabriel García Márquez, among others.

336. Reading Images: Intersections of Art, Film, and Literature in Contemporary Latin America
Enrique Yepes T 6:30 - 9:25
Considers how tensions between seeing and saying enable and/or obstruct understanding, empathy, or spectatorship in case studies from the 1920s to the present. Periods include the restructuring of national identities in the 1920s, the ideological polarization after the Cuban Revolution in the 1960s, the confrontation of censorship in the 1970s and 80s, and the challenges of democracy and globalization in the 1990s and 2000s.

352. The Mexican Revolution
Allen Wells TH 1:00 - 3:55
An examination of the Mexican Revolution (1910–1920) and its impact on modern Mexican society. Topics include the role of state formation since the revolution, agrarian reform, United States-Mexican relations, immigration, and other border issues.