Fall 2014

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LAS 1026. Puerto Rico: History and Identity.
Examines the Puerto Rican experience on island and in mainland US. Begins with a review of the history of U.S. –Puerto Rico relations in political and legal spheres. Explores the theory of borderlands (Gloria Anzaldúa) and considers its connections with this history. Next, focuses on language, migration and settlement in the diaspora, and explores the role of these processes in gendering and racializing Puerto Ricans. Creative writings and forms of cultural production on identity by Puerto Ricans will be examined at various intervals over the course of the semester to supplement historical and ethnographic texts.
LAS 1337. CuBop, Up-Rock, Boogaloo, and Banda: Latinos Making Music in the United States.
Surveys the musical styles of Latinos in the United States. Discusses the role of these musics in articulating race, class, gender, and sexual identities for U.S. Latinos, their circulation along migration routes, their role in identity politics and ethnic marketing, their commercial crossover to Anglo audiences, and Latin/o contributions to jazz, funk, doo-wop, disco, and hip-hop. Case studies may include Mexican-American/Chicano, Puerto Rican/Nuyorican, and Cuban-American musics; Latin music in golden age Hollywood; Latin dance crazes from mambo to the Macarena; rock en español; the early 2000s boom of Latin artists like Shakira, Enrique Iglesias, and Jennifer Lopez; reggaetón, race politics, and the creation of the “Hurban” market; and the transnational Latin music industries of Los Angeles, New York, and Miami.
LAS 2162. The Haitian Revolution and its Legacy.
Seminar. Examines one of the most neglected revolutions in history, and arguably, one of its most significant. The first half of the course treats the Revolution’s causes and tracks its evolution between 1791-1804. The second part studies its aftermath and its impact on Haiti, the Caribbean, Latin America, Europe, Africa and the United States. Course requirements include four short papers on the readings and one substantive paper that assesses the scholarly literature on a topic of the students' choosing.
LAS 2170. History of Brazil.
A survey of Brazilian history from colonization through the present day. Topics include colonial encounter between Africans, Portuguese and indigenous peoples; transitions from colony to empire to republic; slavery and its legacy; formation of Brazilian national identity; and contemporary issues in modern Brazil. Particular attention will be paid to race, religion and culture.
LAS 2205A. Advanced Spanish.
The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.
LAS 2205B. Advanced Spanish.
The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.
LAS 2205C. Advanced Spanish.
The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.
LAS 2401. Colonial Latin America.
Introduces students to the history of Latin America from pre-Columbian times to about 1825. Traces developments fundamental to the establishment of colonial rule, drawing out regional comparisons of indigenous resistance and accommodation. Topics include the nature of indigenous societies encountered by Europeans; exploitation of African and Indian labor; evangelization and the role of the church; the evolution of race, gender, and class hierarchies in colonial society; and the origins of independence in Spanish America and Brazil. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors.
LAS 2407. Francophone Cultures.
An introduction to the cultures of various French-speaking regions outside of France. Examines the history, politics, customs, cinema, and the arts of the Francophone world, principally Africa and the Caribbean. Increases cultural understanding prior to study abroad in French-speaking regions.
LAS 2409. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater.
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.
LAS 2410A. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative.
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.
LAS 2410B. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative.
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.
LAS 2626. Political Economy of Pan-Americanism.
Examines programs for economic and political integration of the Americas from the early nineteenth century to the present. Surveys the material and ideological motives for Pan-Americanism from the Congress of Panama (1826) to the Organization of American States (1948), the draft of a Free Trade Area of the Americas (2001), and beyond. Different forms of integration are evaluated in light of historical consequences and economic ideas.
LAS 2725. Global Politics of Work.
Globally, a large portion of life is devoted to work. The type of work that people perform reflects global inequalities. Introduces the history of wage-labor and theoretical concepts used to understand the shifting dimensions of work and its implication for the global workforce. Particular focus on labor in the U.S., Latin American and Asia, manufacturing and service work, migration and labor trafficking, the body as the site for transforming labor in wage-labor, and forms of labor resistance.
LAS 2738. Culture and Power in the Andes.
Explores the anthropology and history of the Andes, focusing on questions of cultural transformation and continuity among Native Andeans. Examines ethnography, popular culture, and current events of Bolivia, Ecuador, and Peru. Topics include the Inca state and Spanish colonization; Native Andean family and community life; subsistence economies; gender, class, and ethnic inequalities and social movements; domestic and state violence; religion; tourism; coca and cocaine production; and migration.
LAS 3171. Latin-American - United States Relations.
Seminar. Enhances understanding of Latin America by examining the foreign relations of the nations in the hemisphere with a special focus on relations with the United States. The historical arc of the course begins with independence and concludes with the contemporary struggle by the nations in the region for autonomy in the international system. Class discussions will explore weekly readings. Participants should have some background in the history of the U.S. and Latin America. Students will be expected to write an original research paper.
LAS 3219. Letters from the Asylum: Madness and Representation in Latin American Fiction.
Explores the concept of madness and the varying ways in which mental illness has been represented in twentieth-century Latin American fiction. Readings include short stories and novels dealing with the issues of schizophrenia, paranoia, and psychotic behavior by authors such as Horacio Quiroga, Jorge Luis Borges, Cristina Rivera Garza, and Carlos Fuentes. Also studies the ways in which certain authors draw from the language and symptoms of schizophrenia and paranoia in order to construct the narrative structure of their works and in order to enhance their representation of social, political, and historical conjunctures. Authors include Diamela Eltit, Ricardo Piglia, César Aira, and Roberto Bolaño.
LAS 3223. The War of the (Latin American) Worlds.
Discusses the historical, social, and political consequences of the clash between tradition and modernity in Latin America during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as seen through novels, short stories, and film. Particular attention will be given to study of the ways in which the processes of modernization have caused the coexistence of divergent “worlds” within Latin American countries. Analyzes different social and political reactions to these conflictive realities, focusing on four cases: the Mexican Revolution, the Cuban Revolution, the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in Chile, and Andean insurgencies in Perú. Authors to be read may include José Martí, Simón Bolívar, Jorge Luis Borges, Roberto Bolaño, Mario Vargas Llosa, Cromwell Jara, Elena Poniatowska, Reinaldo Arenas, Juan Rulfo, and Gabriel García Márquez, among others.
LAS 3232. Poetry and Social Activism in Latin America.
Considers the aesthetic and thematic problems posed by socially committed poetry during the last 100 years in Spanish America, from the avant-garde to the present. Authors include Mistral, Vallejo, Neruda, Guillén, Cardenal, Belli, and Dalton, among others.