Courses: Fall 2013

  • Please note that for the 2013-14 academic year, official course numbers are now four digits. This page only shows the older three-digit course numbers. If you need to see both the old and the new numbers, consult the College Catalogue.
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202. Demons and Deliverance in the Atlantic World
Laura Premack T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
Seminar. Examines beliefs and practices having to do with evil spirits, demons, and the Devil in Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, the United States, and Western Europe. The primary focus is exorcism. What is it? How has it been practiced? By whom? Why? The approach to the subject is historical, transnational, and diasporic; examines changes and continuities across the Atlantic over the past five hundred years, beginning with cultural encounters between Africans, native Americans, and Europeans during the colonial period and continuing up through the reverse missionization and the new African diaspora of the present day. Readings include works of ethnography, anthropology, theology, history, personal narrative, and fiction.
205. Advanced Spanish
Enrique Yepes T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.
205. Advanced Spanish
Margaret Boyle T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.
205. Advanced Spanish
Maria Baez M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.
206. Francophone Cultures
Hanetha Vete-Congolo M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
An introduction to the cultures of various French-speaking regions outside of France. Examines the history, politics, customs, cinema, literature, and the arts of the Francophone world, principally Africa and the Caribbean. Conducted in French.
209. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
Elena Cueto-Asin M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.
210. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Carolyne Wolfenzon Niego M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.
210. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Nadia Celis M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.
246. Immigration and the Politics of Exclusion
Marcos Lopez M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
The United States, like other nations in the global north, relies on immigrants. In this course we will look at comparative lessons in global immigration to understand the political, economic, and social causes of migration, ; the politics of immigrant inclusion/exclusion, ; and the making of diaspora communities. Specific topics will include: the politics of citizenship and the condition of illegality; the global migrant workforce; and how class, gender, race, and sexuality influence the migrant experience.
250. The Making of a Race: Latino Fictions
Nadia Celis M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
Explores the creation, representation, and marketing of U.S. Latino/a identities in American literature and popular culture from the 1960s. Focuses on the experience of artists and writers of Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican origin; their negotiations with notions of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the United States; and their role in the struggle for social rights, in cultural translation, and in the marketing of ethnic identities, as portrayed in a variety of works ranging from movies and songs to poetry and narrative. Authors include Pietri, Blades, Álvarez, Hijuelos, Braschi, Ovejas, Díaz, and Quiñones. Readings and writing in English, discussions in Spanish. Spanish speaking skills required.
255. Modern Latin America
Allen Wells T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Traces the principal economic, social, and political transformations from the wars of independence to the present. Topics include colonial legacies and the aftermath of independence; the consolidation of nation-states and their insertion in the world economy; the evolution of land and labor systems, and the politics of reform and revolution, and the emergence of social movements.
278. Race and Ethnicity
Ingrid Nelson T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
The social and cultural meaning of race and ethnicity, with emphasis on the politics of events and processes in contemporary America. Analysis of the causes and consequences of prejudice and discrimination. Examination of the relationships between race and class. Comparisons among racial and ethnic minorities in the United States.
305. The Making of a Race: Latino Fictions
Nadia Celis M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
Explores the creation, representation and marketing of U.S. Latino/a identities in American literature and popular culture from the 1960s. Focuses on the experience of artists and writers of Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican origin, their negotiations with notions of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the United States, their role in the struggle for social rights, in cultural translation, and in the marketing of ethnic identities, as portrayed in a variety of works ranging from movies and songs to poetry and narrative. Authors include Pietri, Blades, Álvarez, Hijuelos, Braschi, Ovejas, Díaz, and Quiñones. Readings in English, discussions and writing in Spanish.
311. Global Sexualities/Local Desires
Krista Van Vleet M 10:00 - 11:25, W 10:00 - 11:25
Explores the variety of practices, performances, and ideologies of sexuality through a cross-cultural perspective. Focusing on contemporary anthropological scholarship on sexuality and gender, asks how Western conceptions of “sexuality,” “sex,” and “gender” help (or hinder) our understanding of the lives and desires of people in other social and cultural contexts. Topics may include “third gendered” individuals; intersexuality and the naturalization of sex; language and the performance of sexuality; drag; global media and the construction of identity; lesbian and gay families; sex work; AIDS and HIV and health policy; migration, asylum and human rights issues; ethical issues and activism. Ethnographic examples are drawn from United States, Latin America (Brazil, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Argentina, Cuba); Asia (India, Japan, Indonesia) and Oceania (Papua New Guinea); and Africa (Nigeria, S. Africa). Presents issues of contemporary significance along with key theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches used by anthropologists. Integrates perspectives on globalization and the intersection of multiple social differences (including class, race, and ethnicity) with discussion of sexuality and gender. Not open to students who have credit for Anthropology 2110 {210} (same as Gay and Lesbian Studies 2110 {210}, Gender and Women’s Studies 2210 {210}.)
337. Hispanic Short Story
Gustavo Faveron-Patriau T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
An investigation of the short story as a literary genre, beginning in the nineteenth century, involving discussion of its aesthetics, as well as its political, social, and cultural ramifications in the Spanish-speaking world. Authors include Pardo Bazán, Echevarría, Borges, Cortázar, García Márquez, Ferré, and others.
345. Ecological Thought in Latin American Literature
Enrique Yepes T 6:30 - 9:25
Explores how the radical interconnectedness postulated by ecological thinking can be read in Latin American narrative, essay, film, and poetry from the 1920s to the present. Includes a review of cultural ecology as well as an overview of environmental history and activism in the region.
356. The Cuban Revolution
Allen Wells TH 1:00 - 3:55
The Cuban Revolution recently celebrated its fiftieth anniversary. Offers a retrospective of a Revolution entering “middle age” and its prospects for the future. Topics include United States-Cuban relations, economic and social justice versus political liberty, gender and race relations, and literature and film in a socialist society.