Courses: Fall 2012

010. Music and Race in Latin America
Michael Quintero T 6:30 - 9:25 Gibson-206
A historical survey examining the relationship between musical practice and racial thought in Latin America from the sixteenth century to the present day. Considers the links between non-Europeanized music and ideas of race by looking at travelers' accounts, government documents, and secondary sources. Tracks musical exchange and mixture between groups, and the mixed feelings of attraction and revulsion they provoked. Discusses the role of music in doctrines of racial "whitening" and civilizing. Examines the rise of nationalist folklore in the twentieth century and music's role in multiculturalism and cultural tourism in the twenty-first. Familiarizes students with various Latin American musical genres.
205. Advanced Spanish
Nadia Celis M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Sills-205
The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.
205. Advanced Spanish
Margaret Boyle T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Sills-107
The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.
205. Advanced Spanish
Margaret Boyle T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Sills-205
The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.
206. Francophone Cultures
Jay Ketner M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 Sills-111
An introduction to the cultures of various French-speaking regions outside of France. Examines the history, politics, customs, cinema, literature, and the arts of the Francophone world, principally Africa and the Caribbean. Conducted in French.
209. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
Elena Cueto-Asin M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Sills-207
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.
210. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Carolyne Wolfenzon Niego T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55 Sills-107
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.
221. Beyond Capoeira: History and Politics of Afro-Brazilian Culture
Laura Premack M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Searles-127
Seminar. Brazil has the largest population of African descent outside Africa. Nowadays, Brazilians pride themselves on their country’s unique racial and cultural heritage, but it hasn’t always been this way. For centuries, many Afro-Brazilian practices were illegal. Now, however, we are in the midst of what might be called an Afro-Brazilian renaissance. This is something to be celebrated, but it is also something to be questioned. Do these efforts to delineate, praise, and preserve Afro-Brazilian culture actually limit our understanding of it? Has labeling certain aspects of Brazilian cultural heritage as African created a situation in which other ways that Africa has influenced Brazil are overlooked? Just what do we mean by “African” and “Brazilian” anyhow? Takes a historical and anthropological approach to these and other related questions.
241. Dictatorship, Human Rights, and Memory in Latin America
Elizabeth Shesko T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Pols House-Conf Room
Seminar. Examines the military dictatorships that ruled Latin American countries from the mid-1950s to the 1980s, the movements for democracy that toppled them, and efforts to reckon with their aftermath. Topics include internal and external support for the regimes, the role of truth commissions, the prosecution of human rights violations, and the challenges of writing the history of dictatorship. Considers the cases studies of Guatemala, Argentina, Chile, and Brazil through primary sources and recent scholarship. Taught at both the 200 level and the 300 level. Students at both levels attend the same class sessions; students enrolled in the 300-level course complete a substantial research paper.
250. The Making of A Race: Latino Fictions
Nadia Celis M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 The Hazelton Room (Kanbar 109)
Explores the creation, representation and marketing of U.S. Latino/a identities in American literature and popular culture from the 1960s. Focuses on the experience of artists and writers of Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican origin, their negotiations with notions of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the United States, their role in the struggle for social rights, in cultural translation, and in the marketing of ethnic identities, as portrayed in a variety of works ranging from movies and songs to poetry and narrative. Authors include Pietri, Blades, Álvarez, Hijuelos, Braschi, Ovejas, Díaz, and Quiñones. Readings and writing in English, discussions in Spanish. Spanish speaking skills required.
252. Colonial Latin America
Elizabeth Shesko T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Sills-111
Introduces students to the history of Latin America from pre-Columbian times to about 1825. Traces developments fundamental to the establishment of colonial rule, drawing out regional comparisons of indigenous resistance and accommodation. Topics include the nature of indigenous societies encountered by Europeans; exploitation of African and Indian labor; evangelization and the role of the church; the evolution of race, gender, and class hierarchies in colonial society; and the origins of independence in Spanish America and Brazil. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors.
271. The Caribbean in the Atlantic World
Gregory Beckett M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 Adams-202
An introduction to the cultures and societies of the Caribbean, focusing on the historical changes that have accompanied the European “discovery” of the region and its integration into the wider Atlantic world. Focuses on the culture, history, and political economy of Haiti, Jamaica, and Cuba, among other cases. Topics include European conquest and colonialism; the trans-Atlantic slave trade; the sugar plantation; creolization and the creation of new languages, cultures, and religions; revolution and resistance to colonial and imperial domination; economic dependency and marginalization; the relation between the Caribbean and the United States; migration; popular culture; and tourism.
305. The Making of A Race: Latino Fictions
Nadia Celis M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 The Hazelton Room (Kanbar 109)
Explores the creation, representation and marketing of U.S. Latino/a identities in American literature and popular culture from the 1960s. Focuses on the experience of artists and writers of Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican origin, their negotiations with notions of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the United States, their role in the struggle for social rights, in cultural translation, and in the marketing of ethnic identities, as portrayed in a variety of works ranging from movies and songs to poetry and narrative. Authors include Pietri, Blades, Álvarez, Hijuelos, Braschi, Ovejas, Díaz, and Quiñones. Readings in English, discussions and writing in Spanish.
322. Voices of Women, Voices of the People
Hanetha Vete-Congolo M 10:00 - 11:25, W 10:00 - 11:25 CT-16 Harrison McCann
Focuses on texts written by women from former West African and Caribbean French colonies. Themes treated—womanhood, colonization, slavery, individual and collective identity, relationships between men and women, independence, tradition, modernism, and alienation—are approached from historical, anthropological, political, social, and ideological perspectives. Readings by Mariama Bâ, Aminata Sow Fall (Sénégal); Maryse Condé, Gisèle Pineau, Simone Schwartz-Bart (Guadeloupe); Ina Césaire, Suzanne Dracius (Martinique); and Marie Chauvet and Jan J. Dominique (Haïti).
330. Andean Modernities
Carolyne Wolfenzon Niego T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 The Hazelton Room (Kanbar 109)
Through the discussion of essays, novels, short stories, and films, explores the different ways in which Andean nations have dealt with processes of social, political, and cultural modernization. Focuses on how literature and the arts have represented, responded, and contributed to those processes, since the late nineteenth century until the present day, through local reelaborations of modernist, avant-garde, and postmodernist aesthetics. Readings include works by Peruvian authors Clorinda Matto de Turner, César Vallejo, and Mario Vargas Llosa; Bolivians like Hilda Mundy and Jaime Sáenz; and Ecuadorians like Pablo Palacio and Jorge Enrique Adoum. Addresses the issue of migration and the reconfigurations of Andean identities in the United States, through the works of Bolivian author Edmundo Paz Soldán and the Ecuadorian-American writer Ernesto Quiñonez.
347. Translating Cultures
Janice Jaffe T 6:30 - 9:25 Sills-111
Far beyond the linguistic exercise of converting words from one language to another, translation is an art that engages the practitioner in cultural, political and aesthetic questions. How does translation influence national identity? What are the limits of translation? Can culture be translated? How does gender affect translation? Students explore these questions and develop strategies and techniques through translating texts from a variety of cultural contexts and literary and non-literary genres. Also explores ethics and techniques of interpreting between Spanish and English in different fields.
366. Dictatorship, Human Rights, and Memory in Latin America
Elizabeth Shesko T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Pols House-Conf Room
Seminar. Examines the military dictatorships that ruled Latin American countries from the mid-1950s to the 1980s, the movements for democracy that toppled them, and efforts to reckon with their aftermath. Topics include internal and external support for the regimes, the role of truth commissions, the prosecution of human rights violations, and the challenges of writing the history of dictatorship. Considers the cases studies of Guatemala, Argentina, Chile, and Brazil through primary sources and recent scholarship. Taught at both the 200 level and the 300 level. Students at both levels attend the same class sessions; students enrolled in the 300-level course complete a substantial research paper.