Location: Bowdoin / Latin American Studies / Courses / Fall 2011

Latin American Studies

Fall 2011

137. CuBop, Up-Rock, Boogaloo, and Banda: Latinos Making Music in the United States
Michael Quintero M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
Surveys the musical styles of Latinos in the US. Discusses the role of these musics in articulating race, class, gender and sexual identities for US Latinos, their circulation along migration routes, their role in identity politics and ethnic marketing, their commercial crossover to Anglo audiences, and Latin/o contributions to jazz, funk, doo-wop, disco and hip hop. Case studies may include Mexican-American/Chicano, Puerto Rican/Nuyorican and Cuban-American musics; Latin music in golden age Hollywood; Latin dance crazes from mambo to the Macarena; rock en español; the early 2000s boom of Latin artists like Shakira, Enrique Iglesias, and Jennifer Lopez; reggaetón, race politics, and the creation of the “Hurban” market; and the transnational Latin music industries of Los Angeles, New York, and Miami.

205. Advanced Spanish
Elena Cueto-Asin M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
The study of a variety of texts and media, together with an advanced grammar review, designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

205. Advanced Spanish
Nadia Celis T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
The study of a variety of texts and media, together with an advanced grammar review, designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

205. Advanced Spanish
Enrique Yepes T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
The study of a variety of texts and media, together with an advanced grammar review, designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

206. Francophone Cultures
Isabelle Choquet M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
An introduction to the cultures of various French-speaking regions outside of France. Examines the history, politics, customs, cinema, literature, and the arts of the Francophone world, principally Africa and the Caribbean. Conducted in French.

209. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
Gustavo Faveron-Patriau T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.

210. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Esmeralda Ulloa M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.

238. Culture and Power in the Andes
Krista Van Vleet T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
Explores the anthropology and history of the Andes, focusing on questions of cultural transformation and continuity among Native Andeans. Examines ethnography, popular culture, and current events of Bolivia, Ecuador, and Peru. Topics include the Inca state and Spanish colonization; Native Andean family and community life; subsistence economies; gender, class, and ethnic inequalities and social movements; domestic and state violence; religion; tourism; coca and cocaine production; and migration.

255. Modern Latin America
Allen Wells T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Traces the principal economic, social, and political transformations from the wars of independence to the present. Topics include colonial legacies and the aftermath of independence; the consolidation of nation-states and their insertion in the world economy; the evolution of land and labor systems, and the politics of reform and revolution, and the emergence of social movements.

273. The History of Latinos in the United States
Lori Flores M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
A survey of the social, political, and cultural history of Latinos, the fastest-growing population in the United States, from 1848 to the present. Readings and films focus on the experiences of Mexican American, Puerto Rican, Dominican, Cuban, and Central American communities as separate groups and living amongst each other. Key course topics include legacies of conquest; past and present immigration; inclusion and exclusion; labor movements and activism; articulations of race, gender, and citizenship in urban and rural settings; transnationalism; the development of Latino politics; border violence; and Latino futurism. This course aims to both show the particularities of the Latino experience in the United States and position Latinos as integral figures to more inclusive and revised narratives of the nation's past.

320. Beyond the Postcard: The Hispanic Caribbean
Nadia Celis T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
Explores the historical trends that have shaped Hispanic Caribbean societies through a panoramic study of 20th-century fiction, film, and popular music by authors from the Greater Caribbean and US-Latinos of Caribbean descent. Topics include colonialism, slavery and the plantation economy, imperialism, dictatorships, tourism, migrations, and collective identities. Authors include García Márquez, Santos-Febres, Barnet, Piñera, and Junot Díaz.

337. Hispanic Short Story
Gustavo Faveron-Patriau T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
An investigation of the short story as a literary genre, beginning in the nineteenth century, involving discussion of its aesthetics, as well as its political, social, and cultural ramifications in the Spanish-speaking world. Authors include Pardo Bazán, Echevarría, Borges, Cortázar, García Márquez, Ferré, and others.

345. Ecological Thought in Latin American Literature
Enrique Yepes T 6:30 - 9:25
Explores how the radical interconnectedness postulated by ecological thinking can be read in Latin American narrative, essay, film, and poetry from the 1920s to the present. Includes a review of cultural ecology as well as an overview of environmental history and activism in the region.

354. The Maya: Challenges of Forging Community and Identity
Allen Wells T 6:30 - 9:25
Examines the historical and contemporary Maya from pre-Columbian times to the present with special attention paid to the Maya of Guatemala and the Yucatán peninsula. Uses a variety of primary and secondary materials, including Spanish chronicles, Maya testimonies, travelers’ accounts, scholarly monographs, ethnographies, and films. Topics include the importance of family, community, and spirituality; resistance and adaptation to external threat and conquest; the challenges of acculturation; and the importance of the environment in shaping material life.