Location: Bowdoin / Latin American Studies / Courses / Fall 2010

Latin American Studies

Fall 2010

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205. Advanced Spanish
John Turner T  10:00 - 11:25
TH 10:00 - 11:25
Sills-109
The study of a variety of texts and media, together with an advanced grammar review, designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

205. Advanced Spanish
Carolyne Wolfenzon Niego M  11:30 - 12:55
W  11:30 - 12:55
Sills-205
The study of a variety of texts and media, together with an advanced grammar review, designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

205. Advanced Spanish
Enrique Yepes T  2:30 - 3:55
TH 2:30 - 3:55
Sills-207
The study of a variety of texts and media, together with an advanced grammar review, designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

206. Francophone Cultures
Hanetha Vete-Congolo M  1:00 - 2:25
W  1:00 - 2:25
Sills-205
An introduction to the cultures of various French-speaking regions outside of France. Examines the history, politics, customs, cinema, literature, and arts of the Francophone world, principally Africa and the Caribbean. Conducted in French.

209. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
John Turner T  2:30 - 3:55
TH 2:30 - 3:55
Sills-107
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.

210. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Esmeralda Ulloa T  10:00 - 11:25
TH 10:00 - 11:25
Sills-205
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.

223. Transnational Cosmologies: Andean Examples
Krista Van Vleet M  1:00 - 2:25
W  1:00 - 2:25
Adams-202
Explores the ways various religious beliefs and practices have intersected at particular historical moments, using the Andean region as an exemplary case. Examples from pre-Columbian and Inca, Spanish colonial, and contemporary republican periods highlight the continuities and transformations in local and global religious institutions and the significance of religion to political-economic and social relationships. Uses scholarly readings in anthropology, archaeology, and history as well as novels and films to introduce anthropological theories of religion and globalization; analyze local cosmologies, rituals, and conceptions of the sacred alongside institutionalized global religions such as Catholicism and evangelical Protestantism; and interrogate the significance of popular cultural representations of religion to contemporary social, economic, and political processes.

235. The Economy of Latin America
Julian Diaz T  11:30 - 12:55
TH 11:30 - 12:55
Searles-223
Analyzes selected economic issues of Latin America in the twentieth century and into the twenty-first century. Issues covered include the Import Substitution Industrialization strategy, the Debt Crisis of the 1980s, stabilization programs, trade liberalization and economic integration, inflation and hyperinflation in the region, poverty and inequality, and the Washington Consensus and the rise of populism. Important economic episodes of the past three decades such as the Mexican Crisis of 1994-1995, the Chilean Economic Miracle, dollarization in Ecuador, and the recent crisis in Argentina will also be examined.

236. Borderlands and Empires in Early North America
Matthew Klingle T  10:00 - 11:25
TH 10:00 - 11:25
Searles-313
Survey of the making of North America from initial contact between Europeans and Africans and Native Americans to the creation of the continent's three largest nations by the mid-nineteenth century: Canada, Mexico, and the United States. Topics include the history of Native populations before and after contact; geopolitical and imperial rivalries that propelled European conquests of the Americas; evolution of free and coerced labor systems; environmental transformations of the continent's diverse landscapes and peoples; formation of colonial settler societies; and the emergence of distinct national identities and cultures in former European colonies. Students write several papers and engage in weekly discussion based upon primary and secondary documents, art, literature, and material culture.

237. Family, Gender, and Sexuality in Latin America
Krista Van Vleet T  1:00 - 2:25
TH 1:00 - 2:25
Adams-208
Focuses on family, gender, and sexuality as windows onto political, economic, social, and cultural issues in Latin America. Topics include indigenous and natural gender ideologies, marriage, race, and class; machismo and masculinity; state and domestic violence; religion and reproductive control; compulsory heterosexuality; AIDS; and cross-cultural conceptions of homosexuality. Takes a comparative perspective and draws on a wide array of sources including ethnography, film, fiction, and historical narrative.

252. Colonial Latin America
Allen Wells T  10:00 - 11:25
TH 10:00 - 11:25
Druckenmiller-004
Introduces students to the history of Latin America from pre-Columbian times to about 1825. Traces developments fundamental to the establishment of colonial rule, drawing out regional comparisons of indigenous resistance and accommodation. Topics include the nature of indigenous societies encountered by Europeans; exploitation of African and Indian labor; evangelization and the role of the church; the evolution of race, gender, and class hierarchies in colonial society; and the origins of independence in Spanish America and Brazil. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors.

302. The Idea of Latin America
Enrique Yepes T  6:30 - 9:25Sills-207
Studies how the region currently known as "Latin America" has been conceptualized from the fifteenth to the twenty-first centuries. Which geopolitical interests have shaped the idea of a geographical entity called Latin America? What does the term mean in different parts of the world? What has been the fate of alternate terms such as Abya-Yala, Indo-America, just America, Iberian-America, Spanish America, or the Indies? The analysis of various texts (in literature, history, cartography, philosophy, art, film, music, journalism) introduces intellectual and political debates around these terms, the region's vast diversity, and whether or not it makes sense to consider it a unit. Conducted in Spanish.

303. Conquest and Resistance in Latin America
Esmeralda Ulloa T  1:00 - 2:25
TH 1:00 - 2:25
The Hazelton Room (Kanbar 109)
A contextualized study of Latin America's colonial period from the contrasting perspectives of the colonizer and the colonized. Special attention will be paid to the circumstances in which texts were produced, and to how contemporary perceptions inform our understanding of the period. Texts include letters and journals of the conquistadors, mestizo narratives of lost empires, and narratives of shipwreck and adventure in the New World.

341. Colonial Experience and Post-colonial Perspectives
Esmeralda Ulloa T  1:00 - 2:25
TH 1:00 - 2:25
The Hazelton Room (Kanbar 109)
A contextualized study of key texts from the Colonial period with special attention to the way in which our historical and ideological distance informs our readings. How do contemporary scholarship on the concepts of history, text, and power enhance or limit our understanding? Texts include letters and journals of the conquistadors, mestizo narratives of lost empires and cultures, treatises on the legal status of the natives, and narratives of shipwreck and adventure in the New World, among others.

343. Imaginary Cities/Real Cities in Latin America
Carolyne Wolfenzon Niego M  2:30 - 3:55
W  2:30 - 3:55
HL-311 (third floor)
Examines the representation of urban spaces in Spanish American literature during the last six decades. While mid-twentieth-century fictional towns such as Macondo and Comala tended to emphasize exoticism, marginality, and remoteness, more recent narratives have abandoned the “magical” and tend to take place in metropolitan spaces that coincide with contemporary large cities such as Lima and Buenos Aires. The treatment of social class divisions and transgressions, territoriality, and the impact of the space on the individual experience, are studied in novels, short stories, and film from the 1950s to the present. Authors include Rulfo, García Márquez, Onetti, Donoso, Vargas Llosa, Sábato, Reynoso, Ribeyro, Piñera, Gutiérrez, Bellatín, Caicedo, and Junot Díaz, among others.

348. The Others: The Nineteenth Century Latin American Novel
Gustavo Faveron-Patriau M  6:30 - 9:25Pols House-Conf Room
Explores different genres and styles of nineteenth-century Latin American prose fiction, focusing on the origins of modern narrative in the region, its connections with European and North American traditions, and the way Latin American writers developed new literary vehicles for the representation of the social realities of their countries. Readings include highlights of the romantic tradition such as Avellaneda’s Sab and Ricardo Palma’s Tradiciones peruanas; masterpieces of Gothic naturalism like Cambaceres’s Sin rumbo; Brazilian canonical novels like Machado de Assis’s Memorias póstumas de Bras de Cubas as well as the first classics of fantastic fiction by authors like Clemente Palma and Leopoldo Lugones. Conducted in Spanish

352. The Mexican Revolution
Allen Wells TH 1:00 - 3:55Boody-Johnson Seminar Room
An examination of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920) and its impact on modern Mexican society. Topics include the role of state formation since the revolution, agrarian reform, United States-Mexican relations, immigration, and other border issues.