Spring 2013 Courses

102. Elementary Japanese II
Mitsuko Numata M 9:30 - 10:25, T 8:30 - 9:55, W 9:30 - 10:25, TH 8:30 - 9:55 Sills-207
A continuation of the fundamentals of Japanese grammar structures and further acquisition of spoken communication skills, listening comprehension, and proficiency in reading and writing. Introduces an additional 90 kanji.
204. Intermediate Japanese II
Vyjayanthi Selinger M 9:30 - 10:25, T 8:30 - 9:55, W 9:30 - 10:25, TH 8:30 - 9:55 Sills-209
An intermediate course in modern Japanese language, with introduction of advanced grammatical structures, vocabulary, and characters. Continuing emphasis on acquisition of well-balanced language skills based on an understanding of the actual use of the language in the Japanese sociocultural context. Introduces an additional 100 kanji.
206. Advanced-Intermediate Japanese II
Mitsuko Numata M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Sills-111
A continuation and progression of materials used in Japanese 205.

Asian Studies Courses Related to Japan

201. Literature of World War II and the Atomic Bomb in Japan: History, Memory, and Empire
Vyjayanthi Selinger T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Adams-114
A study of Japan’s coming to terms with its imperialist past. Literary representations of Japan’s war in East Asia are particularly interesting because of the curious mixture of remembering and forgetting that mark its pages. Postwar fiction delves deep into what it meant for the Japanese people to fight a losing war, to be bombed by a nuclear weapon, to face surrender, and to experience Occupation. Sheds light on the pacifist discourse that emerges in atomic bomb literature and the simultaneous critique directed towards the emperor system and wartime military leadership. Also examines what is missing in these narratives—Japan’s history of colonialism and sexual slavery—by analyzing writings from the colonies (China, Korea, and Taiwan). Tackles the highly political nature of remembering in Japan. Writers include the Nobel prize-winning author Ôe Kenzaburô, Ôoka Shôhei, Kojima Nobuo, Shimao Toshio, Hayashi Kyoko, and East Asian literati like Yu Dafu, Lu Heruo, Ding Ling, and Wu Zhou Liu.
216. Asian Diaspora Literature of World War II
Belinda Kong T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55 Mass Hall-Faculty Room
Seminar. Focuses on World War II as a global moment when modernity’s two sides, its dreams and nightmares, collided. Emphasis on contemporary Asian diaspora Anglophone fiction that probes the exclusions and failures of nation and empire—foundational categories of modernity—from both Western and Asian perspectives. On the one hand, World War II marks prominently the plurality of modernities in our world: as certain nations and imperial powers entered into their twilight years, others were just emerging. At the same time, World War II reveals how such grand projects of modernity as national consolidation, ethnic unification, and imperial expansion have led to consequences that include colonialism, internment camps, the atom bomb, sexual slavery, genocide, and the widespread displacement of peoples that inaugurates diasporas. Diaspora literature thus constitutes one significant focal point where modernity may be critically interrogated.
223. Mahayana Buddhism
John Holt M 6:30 - 9:25 Adams-406
Studies the emergence of Mahayana Buddhist worldviews as reflected in primary sources of Indian, Chinese, and Japanese origins. Buddhist texts include the Buddhacarita (“Life of Buddha”), the Sukhavati Vyuha (“Discourse on the ‘Pure Land’”), the Vajraccedika Sutra (the “Diamond-Cutter”), the Prajnaparamitra-hrdaya Sutra (“Heart Sutra of the Perfection of Wisdom”), the Saddharmapundarika Sutra (the “Lotus Sutra”), and the Platform Sutra of the Sixth Patriarch, among others.
234. Politics in East Asia
Henry Laurence M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 Searles-215
A broad survey of political systems across East Asia, including China, Japan, and North and South Korea. Central topics include twentieth-century political development, democratization, human rights, and the political roles of women. Also examines current international relations in the region
284. The Emergence of Modern Japan
Thomas Conlan T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Adams-406
What constitutes a modern state? How durable are cultures and civilizations? Examines the patterns of culture in a state that managed to expel European missionaries in the seventeenth century, and came to embrace all things Western as being “civilized” in the mid-nineteenth century. Compares the unique and vibrant culture of Tokugawa Japan with the rapid program of late-nineteenth-century industrialization, which resulted in imperialism, international wars and, ultimately, the postwar recovery.
380. The Warrior Culture of Japan
Thomas Conlan M 1:00 - 3:55 38 College St-Conf Room
Explores the “rise” of the warrior culture of Japan. In addition to providing a better understanding of the judicial and military underpinnings of Japan’s military “rule” and the nature of medieval Japanese warfare, shows how warriors have been perceived as a dominant force in Japanese history. Culminates in an extended research paper.
Art History 272. The Arts of Japan (previous semester)
Peggy Wang M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 VAC-Beam Classroom
Surveys ritual objects, sculpture, architecture, painting, and decorative arts in Japan from the Neolithic to the modern period. Topics include ceramic forms and grave goods, the adaptation of Chinese models, arts associated with Shinto and Buddhist religions, narrative painting, warrior culture, the tea ceremony, woodblock prints and popular arts, modernization and the avant-garde.