Location: Bowdoin / Japanese / Courses / Spring 2011

Japanese

Spring 2011

Language Courses

102. Elementary Japanese II
Mitsuko Numata M 9:30 - 10:25, T 8:30 - 9:55, W 9:30 - 10:25, TH 8:30 - 9:55 Sills-111
A continuation of the fundamentals of Japanese grammar structures and further acquisition of spoken communication skills, listening comprehension, and proficiency in reading and writing. Introduces an additional 90 kanji.

204. Intermediate Japanese II
Vyjayanthi Selinger M 9:30 - 10:25, T 8:30 - 9:55, W 9:30 - 10:25, TH 8:30 - 9:55 Sills-207
A continuation of Japanese 203 with the introduction of more advanced grammatical structures, vocabulary, and characters.

206. Advanced-Intermediate Japanese II
Mitsuko Numata M 4:00 - 5:25, TH 4:00 - 5:25 38 College St-Conf Room
A continuation and progression of materials used in Japanese 205.

Asian Studies Courses Related to Japan

246. The Fantastic and Demonic in Japanese Literature
Vyjayanthi Selinger M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 Hatch Library-012
From possessing spirits and serpentine creatures to hungry ghosts and spectral visions, Japanese literary history is alive with supernatural beings. The focus of study ranges from the earliest times to modernity, examining these motifs in both historical and theoretical contexts. Readings pose the following broad questions: How do representations of the supernatural function in both creation myths of the ancient past and the rational narratives of the modern nation? What is the relationship between liminal beings and a society’s notion of purity? How may we understand the uncanny return of dead spirits in medieval Japanese drama? How does the construction of demonic female sexuality vary between medieval and modern Japan? Draws on various genres of representation, from legends and novels to drama, paintings, and cinema. Students develop an appreciation of the hold that creatures from the “other” side maintain over our cultural and social imagination.

284. The Emergence of Modern Japan
Thomas Conlan T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Sills-207
What constitutes a modern state? How durable are cultures and civilizations? Examines the patterns of culture in a state that managed to expel European missionaries in the seventeenth century, and came to embrace all things Western as being “civilized” in the mid-nineteenth century. Compares the unique and vibrant culture of Tokugawa Japan with the rapid program of late-nineteenth-century industrialization, which resulted in imperialism, international wars and, ultimately, the postwar recovery.

337. Advanced Seminar in Democracy and Development in Asia
Henry Laurence M 2:30 - 3:55, F 2:30 - 3:55 Chase Barn Chamber
Examines development from a variety of political, economic, moral, and cultural perspectives. Is democracy a luxury that poor countries cannot afford? Are authoritarian governments better at promoting economic growth than democracies? Does prosperity lead to democratization? Are democratic values and human rights universal, or culturally specific? Emphasis on Japan, China, India, and the Koreas.

380. The Warrior Culture of Japan
Thomas Conlan M 1:00 - 3:55 Mass Hall-McKeen Study
Explores the “rise” of the warrior culture of Japan. In addition to providing a better understanding of the judicial and military underpinnings of Japan’s military “rule” and the nature of medieval Japanese warfare, shows how warriors have been perceived as a dominant force in Japanese history. Culminates in an extended research paper. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors.