Location: Bowdoin / Japanese / Courses / Fall 2012

Japanese

Fall 2012

Language Courses

101. Elementary Japanese I
Mitsuko Numata M 9:30 - 10:25, T 8:30 - 9:55, W 9:30 - 10:25, TH 8:30 - 9:55 Adams-114
An introductory course in modern Japanese language. In addition to mastering the basics of grammar, emphasis is placed on active functional communication in the language, reading, and listening comprehension. Context-oriented conversation drills are complemented by audio materials. The two kana syllabaries and 60 commonly used kanji are introduced. No prerequisite. Followed by Japanese 102.

203. Intermediate Japanese I
Vyjayanthi Selinger M 9:30 - 10:25, T 8:30 - 9:55, W 9:30 - 10:25, TH 8:30 - 9:55 CT-16 Whiteside Room
An intermediate course in modern Japanese language, with introduction of advanced grammatical structures, vocabulary, and characters. Continuing emphasis on acquisition of well-balanced language skills based on an understanding of the actual use of the language in the Japanese sociocultural context. Introduces an additional 100 kanji.

205. Advanced-Intermediate Japanese I
Mitsuko Numata M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Sills-111
Increases students’ proficiency in both spoken and written modern Japanese. A variety of written and audiovisual materials are used to consolidate and expand mastery of more advanced grammatical structures and vocabulary. Includes oral presentation, discussion, and composition in Japanese.

405.  Collaborative Independent Study in Japanese
The Program.

Asian Studies Courses Related to Japan

246. The Fantastic and Demonic in Japanese Literature
Vyjayanthi Selinger T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Sills-111
From possessing spirits and serpentine creatures to hungry ghosts and spectral visions, Japanese literary history is alive with supernatural beings. The focus of study ranges from the earliest times to modernity, examining these motifs in both historical and theoretical contexts. Readings pose the following broad questions: How do representations of the supernatural function in both creation myths of the ancient past and the rational narratives of the modern nation? What is the relationship between liminal beings and a society’s notion of purity? How may we understand the uncanny return of dead spirits in medieval Japanese drama? How does the construction of demonic female sexuality vary between medieval and modern Japan? Draws on various genres of representation, from legends and novels to drama, paintings, and cinema. Students develop an appreciation of the hold that creatures from the “other” side maintain over our cultural and social imagination.

281. The Courtly Society of Heian Japan
Thomas Conlan M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 HL-311 (third floor)
Seminar. Japan’s courtly culture spawned some of the greatest cultural achievements the world has ever known. Using the Tale of Genji, a tenth-century novel of romance and intrigue, attempts to reconstruct the complex world of courtly culture in Japan, where marriages were open and easy, even though social mobility was not; and where the greatest elegance, and most base violence, existed in tandem. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors.

282. Japanese Politics and Society
Henry Laurence M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25 Searles-223
Comprehensive overview of modern Japanese politics in historical, social, and cultural context. Analyzes the electoral dominance of the Liberal Democratic Party, the nature of democratic politics, and the rise and fall of the economy. Other topics include the status of women and ethnic minorities, education, war guilt, nationalism, and the role of the media.

283. The Origins of Japanese Culture and Civilization
Thomas Conlan T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Sills-109
How do a culture, a state, and a society develop? Designed to introduce the culture and history of Japan by exploring how “Japan” came into existence, and to chart how patterns of Japanese civilization shifted through time. Attempts to reconstruct the tenor of life through translations of primary sources, and to lead to a greater appreciation of the unique and lasting cultural and political monuments of Japanese civilization. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors.

Asian 291. Intermediate Independent Study in Asian Studies
 

Art History 272. The Arts of Japan
Peggy Wang M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 VAC-Beam Classroom
Surveys ritual objects, sculpture, architecture, painting, and decorative arts in Japan from the Neolithic to the modern period. Topics include ceramic forms and grave goods, the adaptation of Chinese models, arts associated with Shinto and Buddhist religions, narrative painting, warrior culture, the tea ceremony, woodblock prints and popular arts, modernization and the avant-garde.