Location: Bowdoin / Japanese / Courses / Fall 2010

Japanese

Fall 2010

Language Courses

101. Elementary Japanese I
Mitsuko Numata M 9:30 - 10:25, T 8:30 - 9:55, W 9:30 - 10:25, TH 8:30 - 9:55
An introductory course in modern Japanese language. In addition to mastering the basics of grammar, emphasis is placed on active functional communication in the language, reading, and listening comprehension. Context-oriented conversation drills are complemented by audio materials. The two kana syllabaries and 60 commonly used kanji are introduced. No prerequisite. Followed by Japanese 102.

203. Intermediate Japanese I
Vyjayanthi Selinger M 9:30 - 10:25, T 8:30 - 9:55, W 9:30 - 10:25, TH 8:30 - 9:55
An intermediate course in modern Japanese language, with introduction of advanced grammatical structures, vocabulary, and characters. Continuing emphasis on acquisition of well-balanced language skills based on an understanding of the actual use of the language in the Japanese socio-cultural context. Introduces an additional 100 kanji.

205. Advanced-Intermediate Japanese I
Mitsuko Numata T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
Increases students’ proficiency in both spoken and written modern Japanese. A variety of written and audiovisual materials are used to consolidate and expand mastery of more advanced grammatical structures and vocabulary. Includes oral presentation, discussion, and composition in Japanese.

Asian Studies Courses Related to Japan

011. Living in the Sixteenth Century
Thomas Conlan M  1:00 - 2:25
W  1:00 - 2:25
Examines the nature of state and society in an age of turmoil. Studies patterns of allegiances, ways of waging war, codes of conduct, and the social matrix of sixteenth-century Japan, based on primary and secondary sources. Kurosawa’s masterpiece Kage Musha provides the thematic foundation for this course. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors.

015. Orphans of Asia
Belinda Kong T  11:30 - 12:55
TH 11:30 - 12:55
Orphans populate the worlds of Asian diaspora literature, roaming the landscapes of pre-communist Shanghai as much as post-9/11 New York City, the wartime internment camps of Japanese Canadians and postwar military camp towns of Korea as much as present-day Hong Kong and a futuristic Los Angeles. Explores the orphan figure in contemporary Asian American, Canadian, and British fiction written in English, in relation to contexts of war, colonialism, neoimperialism, multiculturalism, and globalization. Authors may include Chieh Chieng, Kazuo Ishiguro, Cynthia Kadohata, Nora Okja Keller, Suki Kim, Joy Kogawa, Wendy Law-Yone, Indra Sinha, and Wu Zhuoliu.

019. East Asian Politics: Introductory Seminar
Henry Laurence M  2:30 - 3:55
F  2:30 - 3:55
Surveys the diverse political, social, and economic arrangements across East Asia. China, Japan, and North and South Korea are the main focus, but attention is also paid to the other countries in the region. Examines the relationship between democracy and economic change in East Asia, and asks if the relationship is different in Asia than elsewhere in the world. Other questions include: Are there common “Asian values” and if so, what are they? What is the role of Confucianism in shaping social, political, and economic life in the region? How are economic and technological developments affecting traditional social institutions such as families? How is the status of women changing? What lies ahead for Asia?

201. Literature of World Warr II and the Atomic Bomb in Japan: History, Memory, and Empire
Vyjayanthi Selinger M  11:30 - 12:55
W  11:30 - 12:55
A study of Japan’s coming to terms with its imperialist past. Literary representations of Japan’s war in East Asia are particularly interesting because of the curious mixture of remembering and forgetting that mark its pages. Postwar fiction delves deep into what it meant for the Japanese people to fight a losing war, to be bombed by a nuclear weapon, to face surrender, and to experience Occupation. Sheds light on the pacifist discourse that emerges in atomic bomb literature and the simultaneous critique directed towards the emperor system and wartime military leadership. Also examines what is missing in these narratives—Japan’s history of colonialism and sexual slavery—by analyzing writings from the colonies (China, Korea, and Taiwan). Tackles the highly political nature of remembering in Japan. Writers include the Nobel prize-winning author Ôe Kenzaburô, Ôoka Shôhei, Kojima Nobuo, Shimao Toshio, Hayashi Kyoko, and East Asian literati like Yu Dafu, Lu Heruo, Ding Ling, and Wu Zhou Liu.

216. Asian Diaspora Literature of World War II
Belinda Kong T  2:30 - 3:55
TH 2:30 - 3:55
Focuses on World War II as a global moment when modernity’s two sides, its dreams and nightmares, collided. Emphasis on contemporary Asian diaspora fiction that probes the exclusions and failures of nation and empire—foundational categories of modernity—from both Western and Asian perspectives. On the one hand, World War II marks prominently the plurality of modernities in our world: as certain nations and imperial powers entered into their twilight years, others were just emerging. At the same time, World War II reveals how such grand projects of modernity as national consolidation, ethnic unification, and imperial expansion have led to consequences that include internment camps, the atom bomb, sexual slavery, genocide, and the widespread displacement of peoples that inaugurates diasporas. Diaspora literature thus constitutes one significant focal point where modernity may be critically interrogated.

282. Japanese Politics and Society
Henry Laurence M  8:30 - 9:25
W  8:30 - 9:25
F  8:30 - 9:25
Comprehensive overview of modern Japanese politics in historical, social, and cultural context. Analyzes the electoral dominance of the Liberal Democratic Party, the nature of democratic politics, and the rise and fall of the economy. Other topics include the status of women and ethnic minorities, education, war guilt, nationalism, and the role of the media.

283. The Origins of Japanese Culture and Civilization
Thomas Conlan T  10:00 - 11:25
TH 10:00 - 11:25
How do a culture, a state, and a society develop? Designed to introduce the culture and history of Japan by exploring how “Japan” came into existence, and to chart how patterns of Japanese civilization shifted through time. Attempts to reconstruct the tenor of life through translations of primary sources, and to lead to a greater appreciation of the unique and lasting cultural and political monuments of Japanese civilization. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors.