Spring 2015

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ITAL 1102A. Elementary Italian II.
Continuation of Italian 1101 (101). Three class hours per week, plus weekly drill sessions and language laboratory assignments. Study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary. More attention is paid to reading and writing.
ITAL 1102B. Elementary Italian II.
Continuation of Italian 1101 (101). Three class hours per week, plus weekly drill sessions and language laboratory assignments. Study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary. More attention is paid to reading and writing.
ITAL 1103. Accelerated Elementary Italian.
Three class hours per week, plus one hour of weekly drill and conversation sessions with a teaching fellow. Covers in one semester what is covered in two semesters in the 1101–1102 (101–102) sequence. Study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary. Emphasis on listening comprehension and spoken Italian. For students with an advanced knowledge of a Romance language or by permission of instructor.
ITAL 2204. Intermediate Italian II.
Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant. Aims to increase fluency in both spoken and written Italian. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on contemporary texts of literary and social interest.
ITAL 2408. Introduction to Contemporary Italy: Dalla Marcia alla Vespa.
In the recent past, Italy has experienced violent political, economic, and cultural changes. In short succession, it experienced Fascist dictatorship, the Second World War, the Holocaust, and Civil War, a passage from Monarchy to Republic, a transformation from a peasant existence to an industrialized society, giving rise to a revolution in cinema, fashion, and transportation. How did all this happen? Who were the people behind these events? What effect did they have on everyday life? Answers these questions, exploring the history and the culture of Italy from Fascism to contemporary Italy, passing through the economic boom, the “Years of Lead,” and the Mafia. Students have the opportunity to “relive” the events of the twentieth century, assuming the identity of real-life men and women. Along with historical and cultural information, students read newspaper articles, letters, excerpts from novels and short stories from authors such as Calvino, Levi, Ginzburg, and others, and see films by directors like Scola, Taviani, De Sica, and Giordana.
ITAL 2500. World Science Fiction.
Explores the local, global, and universal natures of the speculative genre of science fiction (SF) from the early twentieth century through the present. Highlights works from the Golden Age (late 1930s-’50s), the New Wave of the 1960s and ’70s, cyberpunk in the 1980s, and today’s various sub-genres and cross-over incarnations. Approaches the genre as a mode of thought-experimentation and world-building that problematizes actual and possible political, cultural, natural, human, and techno-scientific realities. Among the themes included are the human-machine interface, environmental apocalypse, the alien, and time travel. Readings include short stories from nearly every continent (a number of which will be accompanied by a film or other media) and literary criticism. Integral to the course is an exhibition of Latin American SF at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art and a number of conversations with writers, artists, filmmakers, and scholars of SF from around the world. Counts for the major in English, but not for the Italian minor or romance languages major.
ITAL 3010. Women of Invention: Contemporary Women's Writing in Italian.
Focuses on the development of narrative and theatrical prose written by women in Italy over the course of the twentieth century and on the cultural and social issues raised by their narratives in the context of the dramatic changes that the country was undergoing. These works lead us progressively through an examination of Italy at the turn of the last century, of the image of the ideal female created during the fascist era, of the condition of women in postwar Italy, of the dramatic impact that the feminist movement had on women writing in the 1960s and 1970s and, finally, of the experimentation in theme, style, and technique that has marked the most recent generation of women writers. Students are encouraged to reflect on the relationship between literature written by women and the social and cultural context in which it is produced. Readings include novels and short stories by, among others, Sibilla Aleramo, Natalia Ginzburg, Alba De Cespedes, Dacia Maraini, and Grazia Verasani, and the theatre of Franca Rame. Conducted in Italian