"Was Uncle Tom from South Carolina?" Thoughts about revelations, inspirations and the storied life of John Andrew Jackson

"Was Uncle Tom from South Carolina?" Thoughts about revelations, inspirations and the storied life of John Andrew Jackson

February 10, 20145:30 PM – 7:00 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Susanna Ashton, Professor of English at Clemson University, made an exciting discovery in 2013 - she found the previously unnamed slave who she believes helped inspire Harriet Beecher Stowe to pen Uncle Tom's Cabin.

His name is John Andrew Jackson, and in 1850 he was fleeing the recently passed Fugitive Slave Act. After arriving in Maine, he was directed to Stowe's home where she took him in for the night, hiding him in her home's "waste room."

Uncle Tom's Cabin, published in 1852, fueled the abolitionist movement and helped set the nation on the path to abolishing slavery. Some even claimed it helped start the Civil War.

Jackson was born in 1825 on a mid-size plantation in what is now known as Lee County, S.C. He had a wife and daughter who were sold and sent to Georgia. Shortly after, Jackson made his escape. He made his way to Canada by way of Maine, where he was directed to Stowe's home.

Jackson later learned to read and write and published his own book, The Experience of a Slave in South Carolina, in which he writes, "(Stowe) took me in and fed me, and gave me some clothes and five dollars. She also inspected my back, which is covered with scars which I shall carry with me to the grave. She listened with great interest to my story."

Ashton will talk about how this discovery "changes the history of one of the most important works of American literature." Her findings can be found here: http://www.common-place.org/vol-13/no-04/ashton/

This lecture is presented as part of the Civil War Era cluster, made possible with a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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Zen Browne Exhibit

Zen Browne Exhibit

February 12, 20148:30 AM – 6:00 PM
Blue Gallery

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CANCELLED: For the Rights of All: Jim Crow in Alaska

CANCELLED: For the Rights of All: Jim Crow in Alaska

February 13, 20147:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

DUE TO POOR WEATHER CONDITIONS, THIS FILM SCREENING HAS BEEN CANCELLED. This documentary reveals the true-life story of an extraordinary Alaskan woman who became an unlikely hero in the fight for civil rights.

Free.

Sponsored by the Russell and Janet Doubleday Endowment.

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Film Screening: "Free Angela and All Political Prisoners" (2012)

Film Screening: "Free Angela and All Political Prisoners" (2012)

February 13, 20147:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Cleaveland 151

Black History Month Film Festival

A documentary that chronicles the life of young college professor Angela Davis, and how her social activism implicates her in a botched kidnapping attempt that ends with a shootout, four dead, and her name on the FBI's 10 Most Wanted list.

102 min.

Brought to you by Africana Studies and the African American Society

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Alternative Energy Career Conversation

Alternative Energy Career Conversation

February 14, 201412:00 PM – 1:30 PM
Adams Hall, Room 111 (Common Room)

Are you interested in learning more about a career in the alternative energy field - from wind power to solar and hydro? Join three Bowdoin alums for pizza and a discussion of their work in the alternative energy field. They will also talk about how they got into the field, and give advice to students.

They have experience in financing, regulatory compliance and environmental assessments. There will be plenty of time for Q & A's and informal discussion with the panelists.

Bowdoin Alums:

Trevor Peterson '02, Project Manager, Senior Wildlife Biologist, Stantec Consulting
Katie Chapman '07, Project Manager, EDP Renewables
Abriel Ferreira '10, Pricing and Product Manager, Competitive Energy Services

Co-sponsored by Career Planning and the Environmental Studies Program

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World Cinema Film Festival: "The Ambassador"

World Cinema Film Festival: "The Ambassador"

February 20, 20147:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Bowdoin's World Cinema Film Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students.

The Ambassador (Mads Brugger, Denmark, 2011) is presented by Ericka Albaugh (Government) and Evan Bulman (Reed House). Armed with hidden cameras, black-market credentials, and his wit, a journalist transforms himself into the caricature of a European-African consul to expose Africa's blood diamond trade.

A post-screening reception will be provided by the students of Reed House.

Official Trailer

For more information, contact the Film Studies Program at (207) 725-3552

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World Cinema Film Festival: "Please Vote For Me"

World Cinema Film Festival: "Please Vote For Me"

February 22, 20147:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Bowdoin's World Cinema Film Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students.

Please Vote for Me (Weijun Chen, China, 2007) is presented by Shu-chin Tsui (Asian Studies).

A democratic experiment is happening in central China's most populous city: third-grade students are electing a class monitor. Their experience reveals the sacrifices and benefits required by democracy's implementation.

Trailer

For more information, contact the Film Studies Program at (207) 725-3552.

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World Cinema Film Festival: "Blancanieves"

World Cinema Film Festival: "Blancanieves"

February 23, 20147:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Bowdoin's World Cinema Film Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students.

Blancanieves (Pablo Berger, Spain, 2012) is presented by Elena Cueto-Asin (Romance Languages), Tricia Welsch (Film Studies), Birgit Tautz (German), and MacMillan House. This wonderfully eerie silent film treat and Oscar nominee  recasts Snow White as a talented bullfighter in 1920s southern Spain.

A post-screening reception will be provided by the students of MacMillan House.

Official Trailer

For more information, contact the Film Studies Program at (207) 725-3552.

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"Galileo's Reading" Book Presentation by Crystal Hall

"Galileo's Reading" Book Presentation by Crystal Hall

February 27, 20144:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Crystal Hall, Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities with the Digital and Computational Studies Initiative, shares Galileo Galilei's insults written for philosophers and inspired by Italian poets with a reading from her new book. Also, in celebration of Galileo's 450th birthday and 404th anniversary of his observation of the moon and Jupiter, attendees will partake in a live demonstration using Galileoscopes. These telescopes allow one to view things the same as Galileo.

Crystal Hall holds a PhD and an MA in Italian from the University of Pennsylvania.  Her research and teaching draw from the interdisciplinary crossroads of Italian literature, early modern science and philosophy, and digital studies. The research for Galileo's Reading generated the material for her digital humanities project "Galileo's Library" and the conclusions she reached while writing the book are allowing her to test new tools for large-scale text analysis in multilingual bodies of work.

Sponsored by Bowdoin's Digital and Computational Studies Initiative.

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Power and Survival: The Untold Story of Slave Drivers in the British Caribbean

Power and Survival: The Untold Story of Slave Drivers in the British Caribbean

March 24, 20144:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Dr. Randy Browne, Assistant Professor of History at Xavier University in Ohio, will lecture on a topic that most historians of slavery have overlooked - the role of slave drivers on plantations. 

"Drivers, who were ubiquitous on New World plantations, had one of the most difficult and most important jobs in Atlantic slave societies", and despite that, and "their importance in running plantations and shaping the daily lives of other enslaved people, little is known about them, especially in the Caribbean."


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Wyatt Earp: A Vigilante Life

Wyatt Earp: A Vigilante Life

March 27, 20147:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Join Andrew C. Isenberg, historian of the American environment, the American West, and the encounter between natives and settlers, to discuss his recently published book, Wyatt Earp: A Vigilante Life (2013). A popular culture icon, Earp remains a legendary hero and a "beacon of rough justice in the tumultuous American West" in cinematic battles against organized crime in the 1930s, communism in the 1950s, and, most recently, al-Qaeda. Yet as Isenberg uncovers in his book, the Hollywood Earp is largely fictionalized-and imagined by Earp himself. As Earp tried to reinvent his reputation and cover up his lawless past, Isenberg writes, "He donned and shucked off roles readily, whipsawing between lawman and lawbreaker, and pursued his changing ambitions recklessly, with little thought to the cost to himself, andto others."
An engrossing account of the man and his enduring legend, Wyatt Earp: A Vigilante Life is a resounding biography of a quintessential American figure that questions the way in which individuals, with the help of Hollywood, can rewrite their own legacy.
Join Professor Isenberg on Thursday, March 27 at 7:00 PM in the Shannon Room (second floor, Hubbard hall) at Bowdoin College. This lecture is sponsored by the Bowdoin College Lectures and Concerts fund and the Department of History, with support from Biology, Environmental Studies, Government and Legal Studies.

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Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Civil War: Russwurm Lecturer Robert Levine

Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Civil War: Russwurm Lecturer Robert Levine

April 3, 20146:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Robert S. Levine, Professor of English and Distinguished Scholar-Teacher at the University of Maryland, College Park will deliver the annual John Brown Russwurm Lecture at 6:30 pm Thursday, April 3 2014, in the Lancaster Lounge of Moulton Union. A reception in the Main Lounge will precede the lecture, and both are free and open to the public.

Professor Levine's topic, "Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Civil War" reflects his interest in Douglass, who is the subject of his current book project, The Lives of Frederick Douglass, which "aspires to offer a cultural history of how Douglass's life has been conceived over the past 170 years".

He serves on various editorial boards, including American Literary History; Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies; ESQ: A Journal of the American Renaissance; J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists. His recent awards include a 2012-2013 National Endowment for the Humanities Senior Fellowship, and a 2013-2014 John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship.

Named after the first African-American graduate of Bowdoin College (class of 1826), the lecture series explores the "legacy and status of Black Americans." Notable speakers include Carl Stokes, Vernon Jordan, Shirley Chisholm, Bayard Rustin, Benjamin Hooks, and Julian Bond, among others.

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Common Hour with Dan Kahan, Professor of Psychology at Yale Law

Common Hour with Dan Kahan, Professor of Psychology at Yale Law

April 4, 201412:30 PM – 1:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Dan Kahan is the Elizabeth K. Dollard Professor of Law and Professor of Psychology at Yale Law School. In addition to risk perception, his areas of research include science communication and the application of decision science to law and policymaking. He is a member of the Cultural Cognition Project, an interdisciplinary team of scholars who use empirical methods to examine the impact of group values on perceptions of risk and related facts. In studies funded by the National Science Foundation, his research has investigated public disagreement over climate change, public reactions to emerging technologies, and conflicting public impressions of scientific consensus.

For more information and to view the full Spring 2014 Common Hour schedule, please visit: Events and Summer Programs: Common Hour

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The Uncondemned: The Prosecution of Rape at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda

The  Uncondemned:  The Prosecution of Rape at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda

April 8, 20147:30 PM – 10:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Cleaveland 151

5.3 From April through July 1994, many Tutsi men, women and children were attacked, abducted, raped and massacred in their residences or at their places of shelter or arrested, detained and later murdered. The Accused commanded, organized, supervised and participated in these attacks.

5.4 These attackers, comprising the members of the Police Communale, Gendarmerie Nationale and Interahamwe militia who were under the control of the Accused, used guns, grenades, machetes, spears, pangas, cudgels and other weapons to slaughter the Tutsis.

5.5 The Accused ordered and witnessed the raping and other sexual assaults on the Tutsi females. At all times material to this indictment, the Accused, as a person in authority over the attackers failed to take any measure to stop these nefarious acts on the Tutsi females. The Accused is responsible for the rape of Tutsi(s) as part of a widespread and systematic attack against a civilian population on political, ethnic or racial grounds, and thereby committed CRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY, pursuant to Article 3(g) and punishable in reference to Articles 22 and 23 of the Statute of the International Criminal Tribunal of Rwanda.

Join co-producer, director and writer Michele Mitchell on Tuesday, April 8 at 7:30 PM in Cleaveland 151 to discuss "The Uncondemned:  The Prosecution of Rape at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda." 

Michele Mitchell is the executive editor of Film at Eleven and the filmmaker behind the PBS special “Haiti: Where Did the Money Go?” which won the National Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Television Documentary, the Gracie Award for Best Investigative Documentary, the CINE Special Jury Award for Best Investigative Feature and the CINE Golden Eagle for Investigative Feature, among other honors. She recently complete work as co-director of “The Water War” which is currently in post-production.

 Previously, she was the investigative correspondent on “NOW with Bill Moyers” (PBS), where she won a Gracie Award and an honorary citation at the Overseas Press Awards, and political anchor at CNN Headline News. She is the author of three books and has written for the New York Times, Washington Post, and “All Things Considered” on NPR. A graduate of Northwestern University, she began her career on Capitol Hill.

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A Reading from "Bewilderment": David Ferry

A Reading from "Bewilderment": David Ferry

April 9, 20144:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

The Classics Department Presents:


A Reading from Bewilderment: David Ferry Reads from his National Book Award-winning collection of poems and translations published in 2012.

David Ferry is the most important and successful translator of Virgil (and of Latin poetry generally) alive today; his translations have been recognized and honored with numerous prizes, including a Guggenheim, the National Book Award, and several honors from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

He is also a distinguished poet in his own right, and has published numerous volumes of poetry over a remarkable career.  During his reading, he will share some of his most recent work, as well as reading selections from his translations of Virgil. 

Sponsored by the Stahl Lectureship fund, with additional support from the Classics and English Departments.  Free and open to the public.

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Kemp Symposium Keynote Address with Don J. Wyatt

Kemp Symposium Keynote Address with Don J. Wyatt

April 17, 20147:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

The Spear and Shield of Knowledge: Scientific Transference and Cultural Obstruction Between China and the West

Keynote speaker Don J. Wyatt is John M. McCardell, Jr. Distinguished Professor at Middlebury College. His most recent book is The Blacks of Premodern China (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010). Among his forthcoming publications is the "China" chapter essay in the volume The Image of the Black in African and Asian Art in the renowned series The Image of the Black in Western Art, edited by David Bindman, Suzanne Blier, and Henry Louis Gates Jr., which is scheduled to appear in 2015.

Open to the public free of charge. For more information and the completeschedule of events, go to: 2014 Kemp Symposium or call the Department of History at 207-725-3291.

Sponsored by the Robert J. Kemp Lectureship Fund, Departments of History,Asian Studies, Religion, Chemistry, and Earth and Oceanographic Science.

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Kemp Symposium "Visions of Reality: Science and Other Means of Seeking Knowledge"

Kemp Symposium "Visions of Reality: Science and Other Means of Seeking Knowledge"

April 18, 20149:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Panels: "The Peripatetic," "The Encyclopedic," "The Reflexive," "The Pious," and "The Mathematical"

Modern science enjoys a prominent place and enormous authority in our age. Such prestige is the outcome of a long historical process, during which scientific knowledge and method have been gradually promoted over other forms of knowledge and methods of inquiry. This symposium brings together an interdisciplinary group of scholars to examine the diverse means of creating technical knowledge before and after the birth of modern science. The keynote address and the panels highlight the latest scholarship on a range of issues, from scientific transference between traditional China and the West to nuclear power during the Cold War period.

Open to the public free of charge. For more information and the completeschedule of events, go to: 2014 Kemp Symposium or call the Department of History at 207-725-3291.

Sponsored by the Robert J. Kemp Lectureship Fund, Departments of History,Asian Studies, Religion, Chemistry, and Earth and Oceanographic Science.

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