2012-13 Amanda Vickery

The Golz Lecture for the 2012-2013 academic year will be delivered by Amanda Vickery.

Amanda Vickery, Golz 2012-13 "History through the Key Hole"

Thursday, April 17, 2013
7:30 PM
Kresge Auditorium, VAC
Open to the public

Amanda Vickery is Professor of Early Modern History at Queen Mary, University of London. Her research interests include British society and culture, gender and family, as well as words and objects. Her talk, History through the Key Hole, reflects on the material culture of Georgian homes as it relates to the social and cultural history of eighteenth-century England.

Amanda Vickery was born and raised in Preston, Lancashire. Growing up in a matriarchal mill town where wives historically worked out of the house as well as in, fostered her love of social and economic history, and her fascination with the warp and woof of work and family, power and emotion.

Vickery's first book, The Gentleman's Daughter: Women’s Lives in Georgian England (Yale, 1998), won the Whitfield prize, the Wolfson prize and the Longman-History Today prize.  Her essay 'Golden Age to Separate Spheres', was republished in 2007 in the Historical Journal's 50th anniversary edition of '20 classic papers' and is the most downloaded and cited article in the journal. Other publications include ‘An Englishman’s House is His Castle? Privacies, Boundaries and Thresholds in the Eighteenth-Century London House’, Past and Present (2008), 199 (2008), pp. 147-73; (ed), Women Privilege and Power: British Politics, 1750 to the Present (Stanford, 2001); and Behind Closed Doors: At Home in Georgian England (Yale, 2009). Amanda adapted her book Behind Closed Doors for a 3 part prime-time BBC2 series ‘At Home with the Georgians’ in December 2010. She is currently working on a new project on fashion across the British world and is developing new long span social histories for BBC2.