Fall 2013

Rep. Charles Porter and the Crusade for Latin American Democracy during the Cold War

Rep. Charles Porter and the Crusade for Latin American Democracy during the Cold War

September 11, 2013 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

FACULTY SEMINAR SERIES

Allen Wells, Roger Howell Jr. Professor of History, is the featured speaker.  His talk is titled Rep. Charles Porter and the Crusade for Latin American Democracy during the Cold War.

Open to faculty and staff.
Buffet lunch $3, or bring your own lunch.

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Plutopia: Nuclear Families in Atomic Cities and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters

Plutopia: Nuclear Families in Atomic Cities and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters

September 26, 2013 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Kate Brown is a leading historian of the Soviet Union and post-Soviet Russia, specializing in environmental history, the history of science and technology, and spatial history. In her latest book, Plutopia: Nuclear Families in Atomic Cities and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters, she provides the first definitive account of the great plutonium disasters of the United States and the Soviet Union.

Kate Brown lives in Washington, DC and is an Associate Professor of History at UMBC. She is the author of A Biography of No Place: From Ethnic Borderland to Soviet Heartland (Harvard 2004) which won among a handful of prizes including the American Historical Association's George Louis Beer Prize for the Best Book in International European History. Brown has published articles in the American Historical Review, Slate, Aeon, Chronicle of Higher Education, Harper's on-line edition, Kritika, and the TLS. She is a 2009 Guggenheim Fellow, and has been awarded grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Social Science Research Council, the National Council for East European and Eurasian Research, the International Research and Exchange Board, the Eurasia Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, Harvard University's Davis Center, and the Kennan Institute in Washington, DC. Currently Brown is working on a collection of essays called Being There, about the hapless adventures of an historian trying to recover the lost histories of modernist wastelands.

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American Political Economy From the Age of Jackson to the Civil War

American Political Economy From the Age of Jackson to the Civil War

October 19, 2013 8:00 AM  – 6:00 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

This symposium is a forum for reexamination of American political economy from the Age of Jackson to the Civil War during the war's sesquicentennial. It brings together historians of economics, scholars of American political development, and historians of antebellum America and the Civil-War era to debate the originality and continuing relevance of a neglected set of American economic thinkers.

All panels, which are free and open to the public, will be held in the Shannon Room, Hubbard Hall, on Saturday and Sunday, October 19-20, 2013.  For more information, please see the symposium website »

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Coffee Colonialism

Coffee Colonialism

October 30, 2013 7:30 PM  – 9:30 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Professor Steven Topik (History, University of California, Irvine) will be delivering the lecture "Coffee Colonialism: From the Spice Trade to European Colonies to Latin American National Export Crop"

Coffee, along with sugar, has long been considered one of the primary crops of European colonialism. Prof. Topik, one of the foremost authorities on the global history of the coffee market, will argue that European purveyors were “Johnny-come-latelies” and that New World colonies were much more than simply slaves of their colonial masters.  In fact, they played an important role in shaping the international market for this commodity. Topik’s lecture will trace the evolution of the coffee market and trace our love affair with a beverage that has become such a mainstay in our lives. 


Wednesday, October 30
7:30pm
Searles 315


This lecture is sponsored by the Latin American Studies Program, with support from the History and Africana Studies Departments.

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Slavery, Freedom and the Legacy of the American Revolution

Slavery, Freedom and the Legacy of the American Revolution

November 12, 2013 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Hawthorne Longfellow Hall, Nixon Lounge

Matthew Spooner ('01), ABD, Columbia University, presents Slavery, Freedom and the Legacy of the American Revolution.

This nation was born of a contradiction. The American Revolution, considered as an ideological watershed and as a long and bloody military struggle, led directly to both a new birth of freedom and a great expansion of slavery. Beginning with a discussion of the meaning that the War for Independence had for slaves and free citizens, this talk will reevaluate the impact of the Revolution and explore the twinned rise of slavery and freedom in American History, a complex legacy that we continue to carry in our cities, our prisons, and our foreign wars.

Sponsored by the Departments of History and Africana Studies

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Golz Lecture: Jeremy Suri on Forty Years Since Watergate

Golz Lecture: Jeremy Suri on Forty Years Since Watergate

November 14, 2013 7:30 PM  – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Jeremi Suri presents “Forty Years Since Watergate:  How the Politics of the Early 1970s Continue to Shape Our Society” November 14

Jeremi Suri holds the Mack Brown Distinguished Chair for Leadership in Global Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. He is a professor in the University's Department of History and the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs. 
Professor Suri is the author of several books on contemporary politics and foreign policy. In September 2011 he published a new book on the past and future of nation-building: Liberty's Surest Guardian: American Nation-Building from the Founders to Obama. 
Professor Suri's research and teaching have received numerous prizes. In 2007 Smithsonian Magazine named him one of America's "Top Young Innovators" in the Arts and Sciences. His writings appear widely in blogs and print media, including The Huffington Post, The New York times, and the Boston Globe. Professor Suri is also a frequent public lecturer and guest on radio and television programs.

He writes on his website: "My hope is that my work will reach a broad and diverse audience of citizens. Scholarship cannot substitute for real-lived experience, but I believe it can enhance our contemporary understanding of the choices we confront in the allocation of our resources, the structuring of our communities, and the judgment of merit. 
In this framework, international, transnational, and global history should contribute to better thinking about current international, transnational, and global problems. I am a proponent of historical and political studies that are broad, compelling, creative, and, ultimately, useful. We should research with Monkish rigor, as we write (and lecture) with novelistic flair."

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