Past Events

For more events, please view the Campus Calendar.

Patrick Rael, Book Release and Discussion: "Eighty-Eight Years: The Long Death of Slavery in the United States, 1777-1865"

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November 19, 2015 4:30 P.M.  – 6:30 P.M.
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Why did it take so long to end slavery in the United States, and what did it mean that the nation existed eighty-eight years as a "house divided against itself," as Abraham Lincoln put it?Join Patrick Rael, Professor of History, as he discusses the mix of social, geographic, economic, and political factors that shaped this unique American experience as described in his book "Eighty-Eight Years, The Long Death Of Slavery in the United States, 1777-1865."

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Santagata Lecture: Andrew Bacevich Delivers 'Washington Rules'

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November 16, 2015 7:30 P.M.  – 9:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Andrew Bacevich is Professor of International Relations and History at Boston University and author of the bestseller, 'Washington Rules,' a critique of the country's military industrial complex. Time Magazine calls him "one of the most provocative - as in thought-provoking - national security writers out there today."

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Screening with Filmmaker Shawn Batey: 'The Changing Face of Harlem'

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November 11, 2015 7:30 P.M.  – 10:30 P.M.
Druckenmiller Hall, Cleaveland 151

'The Changing Face of Harlem' examines the revitalization of Harlem as told through the deeply personal stories of its residents, small business owners, politicians, developers, and clergy. Shot over a period of ten years, the film takes a critical look at Harlem's history, early development, its present transformation, and the current concerns for cultural preservation.

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Jacob Dlamini, The Alfed E. Golz Memorial Lecture: "Collaboration in Apartheid South Africa"

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November 3, 2015 7:30 P.M.  – 9:30 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

The struggle against apartheid was understood often as a morality tale, with blacks on one side and whites on the other. The truth, however, was far messier. "Collaboration in Apartheid South Africa, " by Jacob Dlamini, winner of the prestigious Alan Paton award for notable works of South African non-fiction and Assistant Professor of History at Princeton University, explores the role of collaboration in apartheid and specifically examines the role of black collaborators, raising questions about how we might historicize and understand other conflicts from around the world. Tuesday, November 3, 2015 7:30 P.M. Kresge Auditorium, VAC Sponsored by the Alfred E. Golz Memorial Lecture. FMI please contact the Department of History at rbanks@bowdoin.edu

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Cecily Hilsdale: "Revisiting the Mediterranean: Medieval Art through the Thalassic Optic"

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October 22, 2015 7:30 P.M.  – 9:30 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Cecily Hilsdale, Assoc. Professor of Art History and Communications Studies at McGill University, will explore the implications of the emergence and recent turn to the Mediterranean as an analytic frame from the art historical point of view.

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Frederick Davis: "Banned: A History of Pesticides and the Science of Toxicology"

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October 22, 2015 7:00 P.M.  – 9:00 P.M.
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Rachel Carson?s eloquent work, Silent Spring stands as one of the most important books of the twentieth century and inspired important and long-lasting changes in environmental science and government policy. In his most recent book, Banned: A History of Pesticides and the Science of Toxicology, Frederick Rowe Davis thoughtfully sets Carson?s study in the context of the twentieth century, reconsiders her achievement, and analyzes its legacy in light of toxic chemical use and regulation today.

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Maria Ruvoldt: "Michelangelo in Mid-Life"

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October 21, 2015 4:30 P.M.  – 6:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Maria Ruvoldt, associate professor of art history at Fordham University and well-known scholar of the art of Michelangelo, is the author of "The Italian Renaissance Imagery of Inspiration: Metaphors of Sex, Sleep, and Dreams" (2004). As a 2014-2015 Fellow at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, she has conducted research on Michelangelo's highly-finished gift drawings and subsequent copies in other media.

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David Hecht, Book Release and Discussion: "Storytelling and Science: Rewriting Oppenheimer in the Nuclear Age"

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October 20, 2015 4:30 P.M.  – 6:30 P.M.
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

No single figure embodies Cold War science more than the renowned physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer. Journalists and politicians, writers and artists have told Oppenheimer's story in many different ways since he first gained notoriety in 1945. In Storytelling and Science: Rewriting Oppenheimer in the Nuclear Age (May 2015 by University of Massachusetts Press), David K. Hecht examines why they did so, and what they hoped to achieve through their stories.

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Leah Wright Rigueur: "Between Ben Carson and Barack Obama: Black Politics in 2016"

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October 19, 2015 6:00 P.M.  – 8:00 P.M.
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Leah Wright Rigueur's first book, The Loneliness of the Black Republican: Pragmatic Politics and the Pursuit of Power (Princeton University Press, 2015) covers more than four decades of American political and social history, and examines the ideas and actions of black Republican activists, officials and politicians, from the era of the New Deal to Ronald Reagan's presidential ascent in 1980. Her work ultimately provides a new understanding of the interaction between African Americans and the Republican Party, and the seemingly incongruous intersection of civil rights and American conservatism.

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Robert Morrison: "An Economy of Knowledge in the 16th Century Mediterranean"

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October 15, 2015 7:00 P.M.  – 8:30 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

The Bowdoin Medieval and Early Modern Studies Colloquium 'Science Before Science' lecture series presents Professor of Religion Robert Morrison.

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Lisa Bjorkman: "Mumbai's Contested Waters: Everyday Politics of Infrastructure and Access"

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October 5, 2015 5:30 P.M.  – 7:30 P.M.
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

In Mumbai, two decades of urban development and roaring economic growth have seen the steady deterioration of the city's water infrastructures. The everyday risks of water shortage - risks that flow across class lines - are managed and mitigated through elaborate knowledge-exchange networks. The everyday work of getting water to come out of Mumbai's pipes is an activity that requires continuous attention to and intimate knowledge of a complex and dynamic social and political hydraulic landscape - business, brokerage, secondary markets, and socio-political networks whose workings are transforming lives as well as reconfiguring and rescaling political authority in the city.

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Grant Parker: "The Struggle with Greek and Latin in South Africa"

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September 9, 2015 7:00 P.M.  – 9:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Within South African society, ancient Greece and Rome have usually been associated with the establishment. For example, the legal system has had strong links with Roman law, and classical columns adorn colonial-era state buildings throughout the country. On the other hand, a very different kind of classical antiquity is visible in the creative arts, and here we find a much broader range of the classical tradition.

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Russian Language Table

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April 16, 2015 5:30 P.M.  – 7:30 P.M.
Thorne Hall, Mitchell South

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Anne Sarah Rubin: "Through the Heart of Dixie: Sherman's March and American Memory"

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April 16, 2015 4:30 P.M.  – 6:00 P.M.
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

In this presentation, Anne Sarah Rubin uncovers and unpacks stories and myths about the Sherman's March from a wide variety of sources, including African Americans, women, Union soldiers, Confederates, and even Sherman himself.

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Brian Mello: "The End of the Liberalized Autocracy in the Middle East and North Africa"

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April 13, 2015 7:30 P.M.  – 9:30 P.M.
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Brian Mello, author and associate professor of political science at Muhlenberg College, challenges the assumptions that controlled liberalization and the emergence of hybrid authoritarian regimes contributed to authoritarian stability in the Middle East and North Africa.

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Zaheer Ali: "From Malcolm Little to El Hajj Malik Shabazz: A Journey of Faith"

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April 7, 2015 6:00 P.M.  – 8:00 P.M.
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Most discussions of Malcolm X's life tend to emphasize his politics and downplay the role of religion in his life. This talk examines the ways that religion in general, and Islam in particular, figured very early in his life and provided a passport for his growing internationalist politics.

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Craig Steven Wilder, Russwurm Lecture: 'Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America's Universities'

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March 31, 2015 6:30 P.M.  – 8:30 P.M.
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

MIT's Professor Craig Steven Wilder will examine the contrasting figures of "the matriculating Indian" and "the uneducable Negro" to explore the limits on access to higher education in the second half of the 18th century.

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Justice for Palestine Week, Film Screening and Conversation with Director Yasmine Perni - 'The Stones Cry Out'

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March 28, 2015 2:00 P.M.  – 4:00 P.M.
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

The film 'The Stones Cry Out' examines the fact that while media coverage of the conflict in Palestine frames the struggle as one between Muslims and Jews, Palestine was the birthplace of Christianity, Palestinians are both Muslims and Christians, and Palestinian Christians have played a critical role in their land's history and the struggle to maintain its identity.

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Film Screening: 'The Auschwitz Gateway Film' with Filmmaker David Conover

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March 25, 2015 7:00 P.M.  – 9:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Filmmaker David Conover will screen his recently-produced eight-minute film created for the Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial Museum near Krakow,Poland.

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Ido Misato: "Creating Gilded Spaces: Kaisho and the Gilded Folding Screens"

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March 3, 2015 7:00 P.M.  – 8:30 P.M.
Searles Science Building, Room 315

In her presentation, Ido Misato explores the meaning of spaces defined by gilded folding screens, whose glittering and gorgeous surfaces were suitable for and could create extraordinary spaces for religious rituals, where the space enclosed was transformed into an ideal space, if just for a passing moment.

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Andrew Robarts '90: "Merchants, Migrants and Microbes: Ottoman-Russian Relations in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries"

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March 3, 2015 4:00 P.M.  – 6:00 P.M.
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Andrew Robarts "Merchants, Migrants and Microbes: Ottoman-Russian Relations in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries" will show that in response to outbreaks of epidemic diseases and corresponding spikes in population movements, Ottoman and Russian officials--at the imperial, provincial, and local levels--communicated about, cooperated on, and coordinated efforts to control migration and check the spread of epidemic diseases (plague and cholera) across their mutual Black Sea and Balkan borderland. Sponsored by the departments of History and Russian.

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Opportunity Abounds! History Department Fellowships and Grants Information Session

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February 19, 2015 4:00 P.M.  – 5:30 P.M.
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

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Second Annual World Cinema Festival: 'The Tribe' - with Kristina Toland

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February 16, 2015 7:00 P.M.  – 10:00 P.M.
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Newly arrived at a boarding school for the deaf, student Sergey quickly realizes he must win the protection of the school gang's leader to survive. He assimilates into "the tribe"--an institutional system of organized crime involving robbery and prostitution--but compromises his position when he falls in love with a female classmate, who is also one of the gang's sex workers.

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Environmental Consulting: An Alumni Career Conversation

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February 12, 2015 7:30 P.M.  – 9:00 P.M.
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Alumni from large and small consulting firms will come and share their insights, advice and experience about the numerous career paths in environmental consulting

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Common Hour with Dallas Denery: "How We Learned to Live with Lies"

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January 30, 2015 12:30 P.M.  – 1:30 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Is it ever acceptable to lie? In this lecture, Dallas Denery examines the trajectory of historical progression from a medieval world of faith, in which every lie is sinful, to a more worldly early modern society in which lying becomes a permissible strategy for self-defense and self-advancement.

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Race, Ethnicity and Politics: Honoring the Life and Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

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January 19, 2015 1:00 P.M.  – 4:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

In observance of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Professor Cory Gooding's class, Government and Legal Studies/Africana Studies 2052 Race, Ethnicity and Politics, will honor the life and legacy of Dr. King. The class will meet from 1:00 to 4:00 pm in Kresge Auditorium and will include two panel discussions: 1:15-2:15 pm Learning from King and the Civil Rights Movement 2:30-3:30 pm King and the Common Good: Discussing King's Impact on Bowdoin

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Erika Helgin, "It is Not a Crime to Kill the Infidel: Protestants, Catholics, and Religious Violence in Vargas' Brazil." A Case Study

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November 11, 2014 4:00 P.M.  – 5:00 P.M.
Edward Pols House, Conference Room

In the 1930s and 40s, violent confrontations erupted between Protestants and Catholics in the rural region of Brazil known as the sertão. Pastors were threatened and attacked, churches were burned, and, in the most extreme cases, individuals lost their lives. This talk examines the nature and evolution of this religious violence, as well as its relationship to broader national struggles over the future of Brazilian religious identity.

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Lecture, Julie McGee '82: "Home and Away - Africa's Mediterranean"

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November 10, 2014 7:00 P.M.  – 8:30 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

A critical engagement of the politics of place and migration through the work of a few contemporary artists for whom the Mediterranean provides a site of aesthetic interchange, cultural fluidity, and creative complexity.

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Jay Turner: "Unplugged: Toward an Environmental History of Batteries and a Culture of Mobility"

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November 10, 2014 4:00 P.M.  – 5:30 P.M.
Searles Science Building, Room 315

The role of batteries in modern life is not new, nor are claims of sustainability straightforward. By examining the history of batteries, this project aims to shift discussions of sustainability toward the human and environmental dimensions of industrial materials and material flows.

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The Warburg Institute Presents 'British Art in the Mediterranean' (1941): Michael Berkowitz Lecture

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November 5, 2014 7:00 P.M.  – 9:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

"The Warburg Institute presents 'British Art in the Mediterranean' (1941)" with Michael Berkowitz on Wednesday, November 5th at 7:00 pm in the Beam Classroom of the Visual Arts Center at Bowdoin College.

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25 Years Since the Fall of the Berlin Wall: Pop-up Exhibit

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November 4, 2014 7:00 P.M.  – 8:30 P.M.
Blue Room

What do you know about the Berlin Wall? Where were you when the Wall fell? Come and share in an exhibit of memorabilia, research, art, and conversation with students, faculty members, and members of the community.

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Tales from the Hood

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October 30, 2014 6:30 P.M.  – 9:30 P.M.
Hubbard Hall, The Pickering Room (213)

Join us for a Halloween film spook-a-thon! Produced by Spike Lee's production company 40 Acres and a Mule, "Tales from the Hood" re-poses vignette-drive horror films such as "Tales from the Darkside" and "Creepshow" around contemporary themes in African American life on Thursday, October 30 starting at 6:30 pm in Hubbard Conference Room West.

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The Alfred E Golz Memorial Lecture: "Democracy at the Roots: Understanding Haiti's Political Culture" - Streamed LIVE

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October 23, 2014 7:30 P.M.  – 9:30 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Professor Laurent Dubois's upcoming Golz lecture, "Democracy at the Roots: Understanding Haiti's Political Culture," explores three intertwined legacies of the Haitian Revolution on political thought and practice in the country.

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How SWEET It Is To Be A History Major or Minor!

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October 22, 2014 4:00 P.M.  – 5:30 P.M.
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

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Brett Rogers: Tyrannical Teachers and Student-Citizens

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October 21, 2014 4:30 P.M.  – 6:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Professor Brett Rogers, University of Puget Sound, WA, will be joining the many conversations and debates we are having about the "usefulness" of a liberal arts education with his public lecture, "Tyrannical Teachers and Student-Citizens: Classical Greek Perspectives on Freedom and the Liberal Arts."

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Seth Schein: "'War, What is it Good For?' in Homer's Iliad and Four Receptions"

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October 20, 2014 4:30 P.M.  – 6:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Seth Schein will explore the topic of war in the Iliad and the influence of Homer's works on twentieth-century poetry and music.

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Maine, Muskie and Smith [Streamed LIVE]

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October 8, 2014 7:00 P.M.  – 10:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

An Election Season Conversation about 20th-Century Maine Politics featuring Muskie Biographer James Witherell, Smith Biographer Gregory Gallent, and Bowdoin Assistant Professor of Government and Legal Studies Jeffrey Selinger.

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Ryan Cordell Lecture "Viral Texts and the Technologies of Authorship"

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October 6, 2014 7:00 P.M.  – 8:30 P.M.
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Ryan Cordell will draw on the Viral Texts project at Northeastern University to demonstrate how computational methods such as text mining, mapping, and network analysis can illuminate nineteenth-century systems of circulation, reprinting, and remediation systemically and at scale.

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Dr. Naomi Oreskes: "How to Stop Disastrous Climate Change"

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October 3, 2014 12:30 P.M.  – 2:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Naomi Oreskes is Professor of the History of Science and Affiliated Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Harvard University.

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Emptying the Forests: Lecture by Nat Wheelwright

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October 2, 2014 7:30 P.M.  – 8:30 P.M.
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 016

With so much attention focused on how climate change will affect human well-being, we seem to have forgotten about the plight of the other 30 million species on the planet

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Laura McClure: "Women and Theater in Classical Athens"

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October 1, 2014 7:30 P.M.  – 9:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Laura McClure is Jane Ellen Harrison Professor of Classics at the University of Wisconsin. This lecture is sponsored by the Mellon Humanities Initiative--Studies in the Mediterranean, the Jasper Jacob Stahl Lectureship Fund, and the Department of Classics.

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Careers in the Locavore Economy

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September 25, 2014 7:00 P.M.  – 8:30 P.M.
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Maine is an incubator of entrepreneurial opportunities connected to the food economy, and Bowdoin alumni are playing an active role in its success.

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Author Pope Brock: "Another Fine Mess: Life on Tomorrow's Moon"

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September 18, 2014 4:30 P.M.  – 5:30 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Author Pope Brock will speak on his current book project, Another Fine Mess: Life on Tomorrow's Moon, which imagines what might happen on the moon in the mid-to-late 21st century if the schemes various governments, corporations, and obsessed individuals have for it all come true.

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Digital History for Everyone

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September 12, 2014 10:30 A.M.  – 12:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Room 304 (North)

In this workshop Matthew Booker will argue that digital history techniques have become more accessible and more rewarding. We will explore some simple digital history tools for newcomers and mid-career scholars.

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Why Did Americans Stop Eating Locally?

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September 11, 2014 7:00 P.M.  – 9:00 P.M.
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

What caused 19th century food panics and how did they lead urban Americans to lose faith in locally harvested foods?

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Jack Gieseking Book Launch: "People, Place, Space Reader"

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September 10, 2014 4:30 P.M.  – 6:00 P.M.
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Join Jack Gieseking, Bowdoin's New Media and Data Visualization Specialist, at the launching of her book "The People, Place, and Space Reader". Edited by Dr. Gieseking and William Mangold, the book brings together the writings of scholars from a variety of fields to make sense of the ways we shape and inhabit our world. An essential resource for students of urban studies, geography, design, sociology, and anyone with an interest in the environment, this volume presents the most dynamic and critical understanding of space and place available. Professor Matt Klingle will serve as interlocutor, facilitating a discussion of the book. With a B.A. from Mt Holyoke, an M.A. from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. from CUNY, Dr. Gieseking joined the faculty at Bowdoin in Fall 2013. Sponsored by Bowdoin's Digital and Computational Studies Initiative.

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German Table

May 6, 2014 5:30 P.M.  – 7:30 P.M.
Thorne Hall, Pinette Dining Room

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Book Launch: Tess Chakkalakal and Ken Warren

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May 1, 2014 5:30 P.M.  – 7:00 P.M.
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Book Launch: "Jim Crow, Literature, and the Legacy of Sutton E. Griggs". Edited by associate professor Tess Chakkalakal, and Ken Warren of the University of Chicago.

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Community Lecture Series

May 1, 2014 12:30 P.M.  – 1:30 P.M.
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

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Kemp Symposium "Visions of Reality: Science and Other Means of Seeking Knowledge"

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April 18, 2014 9:00 A.M.  – 4:00 P.M.
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

This symposium brings together an interdisciplinary group of scholars to examine the diverse means of creating technical knowledge before and after the birth of modern science. The keynote address and the panels highlight the latest scholarship on a range of issues, from scientific transference between traditional China and the West to nuclear power during the Cold War period.

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Kemp Symposium Keynote Address with Don J. Wyatt

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April 17, 2014 7:30 P.M.  – 9:00 P.M.
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Keynote speaker Don J. Wyatt is John M. McCardell, Jr. Distinguished Professor at Middlebury College. His most recent book is The Blacks of Premodern China (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010).

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Traffic: German Chemists, Austrian Smugglers, and the Cocaine Epidemic in India (1900-1914)

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April 10, 2014 7:00 P.M.  – 9:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Today, Germany is considered Europe's mighty economic and political power; however, its perceived hegemony conceals not only the complex political situation today but also a past full of complicated political, economic, and cultural entanglements that were indeed global, as Alison Frank Johnson's talk will show.

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A Reading from "Bewilderment": David Ferry

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April 9, 2014 4:00 P.M.  – 6:00 P.M.
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

The Classics Department presents A Reading from Bewilderment: David Ferry Reads from his National Book Award-winning collection of poems and translations published in 2012.

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The Uncondemned: The Prosecution of Rape at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda

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April 8, 2014 7:30 P.M.  – 10:00 P.M.
Druckenmiller Hall, Cleaveland 151

5.3 From April through July 1994, many Tutsi men, women and children were attacked, abducted, raped and massacred in their residences or at their places of shelter or arrested, detained and later murdered. The Accused commanded, organized, supervised and participated in these attacks. 5.4 These attackers, comprising the members of the Police Communale, Gendarmerie Nationale and Interahamwe militia who were under the control of the Accused, used guns, grenades, machetes, spears, pangas, cudgels and other weapons to slaughter the Tutsis. 5.5 The Accused ordered and witnessed the raping and other sexual assaults on the Tutsi females. At all times material to this indictment, the Accused, as a person in authority over the attackers failed to take any measure to stop these nefarious acts on the Tutsi females. The Accused is responsible for the rape of Tutsi(s) as part of a widespread and systematic attack against a civilian population on political, ethnic or racial grounds, and thereby committed CRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY, pursuant to Article 3(g) and punishable in reference to Articles 22 and 23 of the Statute of the International Criminal Tribunal of Rwanda. Join co-producer, director and writer Michele Mitchell on Tuesday, April 8 at 7:30 PM in Cleaveland 151 to discuss "The Uncondemned: The Prosecution of Rape at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda." Michele Mitchell is the executive editor of Film at Eleven and the filmmaker behind the PBS special “Haiti: Where Did the Money Go?” which won the National Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Television Documentary, the Gracie Award for Best Investigative Documentary, the CINE Special Jury Award for Best Investigative Feature and the CINE Golden Eagle for Investigative Feature, among other honors. She recently complete work as co-director of “The Water War” which is currently in post-production. Previously, she was the investigative correspondent on “NOW with Bill Moyers” (PBS), where she won a Gracie Award and an honorary citation at the Overseas Press Awards, and political anchor at CNN Headline News. She is the author of three books and has written for the New York Times, Washington Post, and “All Things Considered” on NPR. A graduate of Northwestern University, she began her career on Capitol Hill.

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Common Hour with Dan Kahan, Professor of Psychology at Yale Law

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April 4, 2014 12:30 P.M.  – 1:30 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Dan Kahan is the Elizabeth K. Dollard Professor of Law and Professor of Psychology at Yale Law School. In addition to risk perception, his areas of research include science communication and the application of decision science to law and policymaking. He is a member of the Cultural Cognition Project, an interdisciplinary team of scholars who use empirical methods to examine the impact of group values on perceptions of risk and related facts. In studies funded by the National Science Foundation, his research has investigated public disagreement over climate change, public reactions to emerging technologies, and conflicting public impressions of scientific consensus. For more information and to view the full Spring 2014 Common Hour schedule, please visit: Events and Summer Programs: Common Hour

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Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Civil War: Russwurm Lecturer Robert Levine

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April 3, 2014 6:30 P.M.  – 9:00 P.M.
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

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Wyatt Earp: A Vigilante Life

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March 27, 2014 7:00 P.M.  – 10:00 P.M.
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Join Andrew C. Isenberg, historian of the American environment, the American West, and the encounter between natives and settlers, to discuss his recently published book, Wyatt Earp: A Vigilante Life (2013). A popular culture icon, Earp remains a legendary hero and a "beacon of rough justice in the tumultuous American West" in cinematic battles against organized crime in the 1930s, communism in the 1950s, and, most recently, al-Qaeda. Yet as Isenberg uncovers in his book, the Hollywood Earp is largely fictionalized-and imagined by Earp himself. As Earp tried to reinvent his reputation and cover up his lawless past, Isenberg writes, "He donned and shucked off roles readily, whipsawing between lawman and lawbreaker, and pursued his changing ambitions recklessly, with little thought to the cost to himself, andto others." An engrossing account of the man and his enduring legend, Wyatt Earp: A Vigilante Life is a resounding biography of a quintessential American figure that questions the way in which individuals, with the help of Hollywood, can rewrite their own legacy. Join Professor Isenberg on Thursday, March 27 at 7:00 PM in the Shannon Room (second floor, Hubbard hall) at Bowdoin College. This lecture is sponsored by the Bowdoin College Lectures and Concerts fund and the Department of History, with support from Biology, Environmental Studies, Government and Legal Studies.

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Power and Survival: The Untold Story of Slave Drivers in the British Caribbean

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March 24, 2014 4:30 P.M.  – 6:00 P.M.
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Power and Survival: The Untold Story of Slave Drivers in the British Caribbean

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"Galileo's Reading" Book Presentation by Crystal Hall

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February 27, 2014 4:30 P.M.  – 6:00 P.M.
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Crystal Hall, Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities with the Digital and Computational Studies Initiative, shares Galileo Galilei's insults written for philosophers and inspired by Italian poets with a reading from her new book. Also, in celebration of Galileo's 450th birthday and 404th anniversary of his observation of the moon and Jupiter, attendees will partake in a live demonstration using Galileoscopes. These telescopes allow one to view things the same as Galileo. Crystal Hall holds a PhD and an MA in Italian from the University of Pennsylvania. Her research and teaching draw from the interdisciplinary crossroads of Italian literature, early modern science and philosophy, and digital studies. The research for Galileo's Reading generated the material for her digital humanities project "Galileo's Library" and the conclusions she reached while writing the book are allowing her to test new tools for large-scale text analysis in multilingual bodies of work. Sponsored by Bowdoin's Digital and Computational Studies Initiative.

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World Cinema Film Festival: "Blancanieves"

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February 23, 2014 7:00 P.M.  – 9:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Spanish director Pablo Berger recasts Snow White as a bullfighter.

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World Cinema Film Festival: "Please Vote For Me"

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February 22, 2014 7:00 P.M.  – 9:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Chinese third-graders experience democracy in a class experiment.

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World Cinema Film Festival: "The Ambassador"

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February 20, 2014 7:00 P.M.  – 9:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

In this Danish film, a journalist disguises himself to expose Africa's blood diamond trade.

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Alternative Energy Career Conversation

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February 14, 2014 12:00 P.M.  – 1:30 P.M.
Adams Hall, Room 111 (Common Room)

Are you interested in learning more about a career in the alternative energy field - from wind power to solar and hydro? Join three Bowdoin alums for pizza and a discussion of their work in the alternative energy field.

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CANCELLED: For the Rights of All: Jim Crow in Alaska

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February 13, 2014 7:00 P.M.  – 8:30 P.M.
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

This documentary reveals the true-life story of an extraordinary Alaskan woman who became an unlikely hero in the fight for civil rights.

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Film Screening: "Free Angela and All Political Prisoners" (2012)

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February 13, 2014 7:00 P.M.  – 9:00 P.M.
Druckenmiller Hall, Cleaveland 151

A documentary that chronicles the life of young college professor Angela Davis, and how her social activism implicates her in a botched kidnapping attempt that ends with a shootout, four dead, and her name on the FBI's 10 Most Wanted list.

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Zen Browne Exhibit

February 12, 2014 8:30 A.M.  – 6:00 P.M.
Blue Gallery

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"Was Uncle Tom from South Carolina?" Thoughts about revelations, inspirations and the storied life of John Andrew Jackson

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February 10, 2014 5:30 P.M.  – 7:00 P.M.
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

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Golz Lecture: Jeremy Suri on Forty Years Since Watergate

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November 14, 2013 7:30 P.M.  – 9:30 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Jeremi Suri, Mack Brown Distinguished Chair for Leadership in Global Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin, presents "Forty Years Since Watergate: How the Politics of the Early 1970s Continue to Shape Our Society."

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Slavery, Freedom and the Legacy of the American Revolution

November 12, 2013 4:30 P.M.  – 6:00 P.M.
Hawthorne Longfellow Library, Nixon Lounge

Sponsored by the Departments of History and Africana Studies Sponsored by the Departments of History and Africana Studies.

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Coffee Colonialism

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October 30, 2013 7:30 P.M.  – 9:30 P.M.
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Professor Steven Topik (History, University of California, Irvine) will be delivering the lecture "Coffee Colonialism: From the Spice Trade to European Colonies to Latin American National Export Crop."

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American Political Economy From the Age of Jackson to the Civil War

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October 19, 2013 8:00 A.M.  – 6:00 P.M.
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

This symposium is a forum for reexamination of American political economy from the Age of Jackson to the Civil War during the war's sesquicentennial.

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Plutopia: Nuclear Families in Atomic Cities and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters

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September 26, 2013 7:00 P.M.  – 9:00 P.M.
Searles Science Building, Room 315

While many transnational histories of the nuclear arms race have been written, Kate Brown's book Plutopia provides the first definitive account of the great plutonium disasters of the United States and the Soviet Union.

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Rep. Charles Porter and the Crusade for Latin American Democracy during the Cold War

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September 11, 2013 12:00 P.M.  – 1:00 P.M.
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Allen Wells, Roger Howell Jr. Professor of History, will speak about Charles Porter and the crusade for Latin American democracy during the Cold War.

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Lecture - O.O. Howard and African American Mutual Aid During Reconstruction

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April 25, 2013 6:00 P.M.  – 7:30 P.M.
Hawthorne Longfellow Library, Nixon Lounge

Gretchen Long, Associate Professor of History at Williams College, will discuss exchanges between African Americans and O.O. Howard, Bowdoin class of 1850 and Commissioner of the Freedmen's Bureau.

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Amanda Vickery: History Through the Keyhole

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April 17, 2013 7:30 P.M.  – 9:30 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

"Amanda Vickery is Professor of Early Modern History at Queen Mary, University of London. Her talk, History through the Key Hole, reflects on the material culture of Georgian homes as it relates to the social and cultural history of eighteenth-century England.

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Bowdoin and the Civil War at 150

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April 3, 2013 4:30 P.M.  – 6:30 P.M.
Searles Science Building, Room 315

In commemoration of the sesquicentennial anniversary of the war, two Bowdoin history alumni whose research expertise unites College history and the Civil War will return to the College to participate in a symposium exploring the relationship between the war and Bowdoin.

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Brian Purnell presents: Economic Development in Brooklyn, New York's "Ghetto:" 1968-1985

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April 2, 2013 12:00 P.M.  – 1:00 P.M.
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

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The Seed Underground: A Growing Revolution to Save Food

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March 29, 2013 12:30 P.M.  – 1:30 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

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Durba Mitra presents: Testing Chastity, Evidencing Rape: Medical Evidence, Women's Rights, and Law in India

February 12, 2013 12:00 P.M.  – 1:00 P.M.
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

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Sarah McMahon presents: Thorn the Murderer

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February 6, 2013 12:00 P.M.  – 1:00 P.M.
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

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Film Screening and Discussion of "War Don Don" with Director/Producer Rebecca Richman Cohen

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December 3, 2012 7:00 P.M.  – 9:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

In the heart of Sierra Leone, UN soldiers guard a heavily fortified building known as the "special court," inside which Issa Sesay, an alleged war criminal, awaits his trial. Sesay's indictment sheds light on--and calls into question--the complex role of the international justice system.

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Lecture with Eduardo Gonzalez Cueva on Internal Armed Conflict in Peru

November 19, 2012 7:00 P.M.  – 9:00 P.M.
Adams Hall, Room 111 (Common Room)

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Ethnic Identity and Imperial Stability in the Histories of Tacitus

November 15, 2012 4:30 P.M.  – 6:00 P.M.
Searles Science Building, Room 315

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Veronica Pasfield, "Kill the Indian to Save the Man": the "Indian Problem" and Native American Boarding Schools

November 14, 2012 6:30 P.M.  – 8:30 P.M.
Hubbard Hall, The Pickering Room (213)

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History Department Prospective Majors & Study Abroad Meeting

October 30, 2012 4:00 P.M.  – 5:00 P.M.
Hubbard Hall, The Pickering Room (213)

Thinking of becoming a History Major or Minor? Want to study away? Please come to our annual History Department Prospective Majors/Minors & Study Away Informational Meeting. Our faculty and student representatives will be on hand to chat and answer any questions you may have.

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Santagata Lecture: "Dirty Nasty Politics in Early America" by Joanne Freeman

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October 24, 2012 7:30 P.M.  – 10:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

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Lecture: "Marianne into Battle? The Paulista Woman and the War of Sao Paulo" Oct. 18

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October 18, 2012 4:00 P.M.  – 5:30 P.M.
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

In 1932 the state of Sao Paulo -- then, as today, the most prosperous and populous state in Brazil -- declared war against the federal government. The conflict that ensued became a major event in Sao Paulo's history, and a crucial marker of regional identity.

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