Calendar of Events

Why Did Americans Stop Eating Locally?

Why Did Americans Stop Eating Locally?

September 11, 2014 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

In his talk Matthew Booker will explore why urban Americans radically changed their diets in the twentieth century. Tracing the American diet from local oysters to long distance burgers, he will suggest ways we can learn from this history as we rethink today's and tomorrow's food.

Matthew Booker is an associate professor of History at North Carolina State University, and a specialist in Environmental History and Western North American History.

For more information on this event, please see the website.

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Resilient America: The Election of 1968

Resilient America: The Election of 1968

October 9, 2014 4:15 PM  – 6:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Michael Nelson is the Fulmer Professor of Political Science at Rhodes College and a senior fellow at the University of Virginia's Miller Center. He has published more than two dozen books and nearly two hundred articles on the presidency, elections, the bureaucracy, religious affairs, and public policy, including the most-used presidency textbook, The Presidency and the Political System, now in its tenth edition.

Nelson’s most recent book is Resilient America: Electing Nixon in 1968, Channeling Dissent, and Dividing Government (University Press of Kansas, 2014), which will be the topic of his talk. A limited number of copies of Resilient America will be available for purchase and signing after the talk.

Sponsored by the Department of Government & Legal Studies, with support from the John C. Donovan Lecture Fund.

Open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

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The United States and Greece

The United States and Greece

October 16, 2014 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

David D. Pearce '72 was nominated by President Obama to be US Ambassador to Greece on June 24, 2013. A 30-year veteran of the Foreign Service with long experience in the Middle East, he has held multiple diplomatic positions, including Senior Deputy Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asian Affairs, Assistant Chief of Mission at the US Embassy in Kabul, and US Ambassador to the People's Democratic Republic of Algeria.

Join Ambassador Pearce for an analysis of historic diplomatic relations between the United States and Greece, the recent economic crisis there, European security concerns, and future challenges in the Mediterranean and their significance for the United States.

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Is War Between The Great Powers Still Possible?

Is War Between The Great Powers Still Possible?

October 20, 2014 7:30 PM  – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Christopher Coker is Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics. He was a NATO Fellow in 1981, and served two terms on the Council of the Royal United Services Institute. He is a serving member of the Washington Strategy Seminar; the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis (Cambridge, Mass); the Black Sea University Foundation; the Moscow School of Politics and the IDEAS Advisory Board. He is a member of the Academic Board of the Czech Diplomatic Academy. He was a Visiting Fellow of Goodenough College in 2003-4. He is a member of the Executive Council for the Belgrade University International Summer School for Democracy and also President of the Centre for Media and Communications of a Democratic Romania. He is a former editor of The Atlantic Quarterly and The European Security Analyst. He has advised several Conservative Party think tanks including the Institute for European Defence and Strategic Studies and the Centre for Policy Studies and helped to draw up the Party's defence platform in the 1996 European Parliamentary Elections. He has written for The Wall Street Journal; The Wall St Journal (Europe); The Times; The Independent; The European, The Spectator, The Times Literary Supplement and The Literary Review. He is a regular lecturer at the Royal College of Defence Studies (London); the NATO Defence College (Rome), the Centre for International Security (Geneva) and the National Institute for Defence Studies (Tokyo) He has spoken at other military institutes in Western Europe, North America, Australia and South-east Asia.

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Brett Rogers: Tyrannical Teachers and Student-Citizens

Brett Rogers: Tyrannical Teachers and Student-Citizens

October 21, 2014 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Professor Brett Rogers, University of Puget Sound, WA, will be joining the many conversations and debates we are having about the "usefulness" of a liberal arts education with his public lecture, "Tyrannical Teachers and Student-Citizens: Classical Greek Perspectives on Freedom and the Liberal Arts." This talk starts with a curious question that arises in classical Greek tragedy – Why do tyrants talk like teachers? – and explores the social and political implications of ‘teaching’ in fifth century BCE Athens. One significant problem that arises from this exploration is whether students can actually be ‘free’, and thus calls into question some of the premises that underlie not only the foundations for the liberal arts (‘the skills possessed by a free person’) in Plato and Aristotle, but also the notion of freedom for student-citizens even in a liberal arts and democratic context. Support for this event provided by the Jasper Jacob Stahl Lectureship Fund, the Mellon Humanities Initiative--Studies in the Mediterranean, and the Classics Department with additional support from the Education, Government, and Philosophy Departments.

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Book Release Celebration - David Collings "Stolen Future, Broken Present: The Human Significance of Climate Change"

Book Release Celebration - David Collings "Stolen Future, Broken Present: The Human Significance of Climate Change"

October 22, 2014 4:15 PM  – 5:15 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Join us for a discussion and reception celebrating the release of Bowdoin Professor of English David Collings' new book, Stolen Future, Broken Present: The Human Significance of Climate Change, moderated by Collin Roesler, Associate Professor of Earth and Oceanographic Science at Bowdoin.

In Stolen Future, Collings argues that we are virtually out of time to prevent severe, irreversible climate change - with a devastating effect on how we think about the future.

Nearly everything we do, Collings says, is premised on the assumption that the world we know will endure into the future and provide a sustaining context for our activities. But today the future of a viable biosphere, and thus the purpose of our present activities, is put into question. A disappearing future leads to a broken present, a strange incoherence in the feel of everyday life.

We thus face the unprecedented challenge of salvaging a basis for our lives today. That basis may be found in our capacity to assume an infinite responsibility for ecological disaster. By owning disaster and accepting our small place within the inhuman forces of the biosphere, we may discover how to live with responsibility and serenity whatever may come.

David Collings teaches courses in British Romanticism, critical theory, sexuality and gender, and environmental studies. He is the author of Wordsworthian Errancies: The Poetics of Cultural Dismemberment (1994) and Monstrous Society: Reciprocity, Discipline, and the Political Uncanny, c. 1780-1848 (2009), among others.

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The Alfred E Golz Memorial Lecture: "Democracy at the Roots: Understanding Haiti's Political Culture" - Streamed LIVE

The Alfred E Golz Memorial Lecture: "Democracy at the Roots: Understanding Haiti's Political Culture" - Streamed LIVE

October 23, 2014 7:30 PM  – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Laurent Dubois is the Marcello Lotti Professor of Romance Studies and History at Duke University. He is the author of several books on the history and culture of the French Caribbean and Atlantic World, including Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution (2004), A Colony of Citizens: Revolution and Slave Emancipation in the French Caribbean, 1787-1804 (2004), and his latest work, Haiti: The Aftershocks of History (2012). He also has an interest in the relationship between sports and politics. In 2010 he published Soccer Empire: The World Cup and the Future of France. He is currently preparing a book manuscript on the history of the banjo, for which he has received several awards, including a Mellon New Directions Fellowship, and fellowships from the National Humanities Center and the Guggenheim Foundation. Professor Dubois also served as head historical consultant for a PBS documentary on the Haitian Revolution, which premiered in 2009.

Professor Dubois's upcoming Golz lecture, "Democracy at the Roots: Understanding Haiti's Political Culture," explores three intertwined legacies of the Haitian Revolution on political thought and practice in the country: the largely hostile reaction to it outside the country, the formation of new political institutions and structures, and -- most importantly -- the creation of a new set of cultural, social, and economic structures that Jean Casimir has called the “counter-plantation” system. He identifies both the main currents and critical counter-currents within each of these legacies, calling attention to the aspects of the latter legacies that seem to him to be the most valuable and worth comprehending and nourishing in constructing new Haitian futures.

This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin's Live Webcasts page.

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Christopher Bolton Lecture "Oshii Mamoru's Avalon: Gaming, Graphics, History, and the Future of Japanese Film"

Christopher Bolton Lecture "Oshii Mamoru's Avalon:  Gaming, Graphics, History, and the Future of Japanese Film"

November 10, 2014 4:00 PM  – 5:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Oshii Mamoru is one of anime's most recognizable directors worldwide. Avalon (2001) is an anime-inspired live-action movie about a grim future in which people escape their grey lives by playing an immersive virtual reality war game. Filmed in Poland with a Polish cast and military hardware borrowed from the Polish army, Avalon combines this setting and a range of subtle visual effects to revisit the history of Japan and the West during the Cold War.

Dr. Christopher Bolton, Associate Professor of Comparative and Japanese Literature at Williams College, is a specialist on Japanese science fiction and animation; he is also the associate editor of the journal Mechademia.

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Zach Heiden, "From Hamdan to Hobby Lobby: Nine Years of the Roberts Court"

Zach Heiden, "From Hamdan to Hobby Lobby: Nine Years of the Roberts Court"

November 12, 2014 7:30 PM  – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Zach Heiden is the Legal Director of the ACLU of Maine.  He received his A.B. from Bowdoin College in 1995, where he majored in English. He has litigated cases to defend the civil rights and civil liberties of artists, immigrants, journalists, pregnant women, prisoners, protesters, religious minorities, students, and whistleblowers. Zach has been recognized as "rising star" in New England Super Lawyer magazine, which called him "a hero to beer drinkers everywhere" for his challenge to censorship of alcoholic beverage label illustrations.

In addition to litigation, Zach frequently testifies before committees of the Maine Legislature. In 2008, he served as a member of the Maine Judicial Branch Indigent Legal Services Commission, which helped restructure the delivery of constitutionally-mandated legal representation to indigent individuals. Zach has also served on the Judicial Branch Taskforce on Electronic Court Records Access and the Judicial Branch Advisory Committee on Fees. In 2012, Zach served on the Executive Committee of Mainers United for Marriage, the statewide campaign to win marriage equality. Zach has served as an adjunct professor at the University of Maine School of Law, where he taught constitutional law.

Zach joined the ACLU of Maine in February 2004 as the organization's first staff attorney, and he was promoted to Legal Director in March 2007. Prior to that, he was an associate in the litigation department of Testa, Hurwitz & Thibeault in Boston, where he worked on white-collar defense and securities litigation. Zach received his M.A. in Modern Irish and British Literature from the University of Florida (1998). He earned his J.D. from Boston College Law School (2002), and he was awarded the Law School Alumni Association Award at graduation. During law school, Zach served as managing editor of the BCLS International and Comparative Law Review, and he founded BC Law's first chapter of the American Constitution Society. Following law school, Zach clerked for the Honorable Susan Calkins on the Maine Supreme Judicial Court. He is the author of Fences and Neighbors, 17 Law and Literature 225 (2005) and Too Low a Price: Waiver and the Right to Counsel, 62 Maine L. Rev. 488 (2010).

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