Upcoming Events

Grant Parker: "The Struggle with Greek and Latin in South Africa"

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September 9, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Within South African society, ancient Greece and Rome have usually been associated with the establishment. For example, the legal system has had strong links with Roman law, and classical columns adorn colonial-era state buildings throughout the country. On the other hand, a very different kind of classical antiquity is visible in the creative arts, and here we find a much broader range of the classical tradition. Sophocles' Antigone was famously performed by Nelson Mandela and other political prisoners on Robben Island. In this talk, Professor Grant Parker concentrates on lesser known moments from the apartheid era (1948-91), when ancient Greece and Rome intersected unexpectedly with the Struggle for democracy. 

As associate professor of Classics at Stanford University, Parker has a renowned reputation for his scholarship on monumentalization in the classical world, and for more recent work on the relevance of classics to the struggle against apartheid and the post-apartheid monumentalization of Mandela. 

Sponsored by the Lectures and Concerts Committee and the Departments of History, Classics and Africana Studies.

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Cold War in A Cold Climate: Exhibit and Reception in Honor of Harold Grundy

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September 19, 2015 11:00 AM  – 12:30 PM
Hubbard Hall, Lobby 1st floor

Cold War in a Cold Climate: Greenland's Ballistic Missile Early Warning System

Harold Grundy of Bath, Maine, spent the early 1960s working for RCA in Northwest Greenland. He supervised the construction and maintenance of the massive radar installations at Thule, Greenland, location of the Ballistic Missile Early Warning System. This reception is in honor of Mr. Grundy, who recently donated photographs documenting that work to Bowdoin College.

Free and open to the public.

Sponsored by The Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum and Arctic Studies Center.

Photo caption: Radome at J-Site, part of the Ballistic Missile Early-Warning System at Thule, Greenland, ca. 1962. Gift of Harold Grundy.

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Frederick Davis: "Banned: A History of Pesticides and the Science of Toxicology"

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October 22, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Frederick Rowe Davis is an environmental historian and historian of science at Florida State University. His most recent book, Banned: A History of Pesticides and the Science of Toxicology, was published last year by Yale University Press.

Sponsored by the Lectures & Concerts Committee, and the Departments of History, Government, Environmental Studies, and Chemistry.

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Andrew Bacevich, Santagata Lecture: "Washington Rules"

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November 16, 2015 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Andrew Bacevich is professor of international relations and history at Boston University; he previously taught at Johns Hopkins University and at West Point, where he graduated in 1969. Time magazine calls him "one of the most provocative - as in thought-provoking - national security writers out there today."  Bacevich's bestseller, Washington Rules, is a critique of the country's military industrial complex.

Andrew Bacevich also holds a Ph.D. in American diplomatic history from Princeton. With the US Army, he served during the Vietnam War, and has held posts in Germany and the Persian Gulf; he retired, as a Colonel, in the early 1990s. Bacevich's books include The New American Militarism: How Americans Are Seduced by War, and American Empire: The Realities and Consequences of U. S. Diplomacy. Bacevich has also written for The Atlantic, Foreign Affairs, and The New York Times, and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Sponsored by the Kenneth V. Santagata Memorial Fund.

Free and open to the public.

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