Location: Bowdoin / Government and Legal Studies / Calendar / Fall 2013

Government and Legal Studies

Fall 2013

Applications of Network Science to Environmental Policy (Mark Lubell)

Applications of Network Science to Environmental Policy (Mark Lubell)

September 17, 20137:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Professor Mark Lubell, Director of the Center for Environmental Policy and Behavior at the University of California-Davis, will share lessons learned from more than 15 years conducting economics valuation research to inform public policy decisions. He will speak about social networks as core components of policy processes and individual decision-making. The emerging field of network science is developing theories and methods for studying networks in empirical settings. This talk will provide an overview of the application of network science to public policy, including case studies of water management, sustainable viticulture, and climate change on public lands. For more information, see the webpage.

Co-sponsored by the Government Department, the McKeen Center for the Common Good, and Environmental Studies Program. For more information call 725-3396.

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Plutopia: Nuclear Families in Atomic Cities and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters

Plutopia: Nuclear Families in Atomic Cities and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters

September 26, 20137:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Kate Brown is a leading historian of the Soviet Union and post-Soviet Russia, specializing in environmental history, the history of science and technology, and spatial history. In her latest book, Plutopia: Nuclear Families in Atomic Cities and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters, she provides the first definitive account of the great plutonium disasters of the United States and the Soviet Union.

Kate Brown lives in Washington, DC and is an Associate Professor of History at UMBC. She is the author of A Biography of No Place: From Ethnic Borderland to Soviet Heartland (Harvard 2004) which won among a handful of prizes including the American Historical Association's George Louis Beer Prize for the Best Book in International European History. Brown has published articles in the American Historical Review, Slate, Aeon, Chronicle of Higher Education, Harper's on-line edition, Kritika, and the TLS. She is a 2009 Guggenheim Fellow, and has been awarded grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Social Science Research Council, the National Council for East European and Eurasian Research, the International Research and Exchange Board, the Eurasia Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, Harvard University's Davis Center, and the Kennan Institute in Washington, DC. Currently Brown is working on a collection of essays called Being There, about the hapless adventures of an historian trying to recover the lost histories of modernist wastelands.

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Colin Woodard on Watchdog Journalism

Colin Woodard on Watchdog Journalism

October 16, 20137:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Thorne Hall, Daggett Lounge

Watchdog Journalism: The Vital Role of a Threatened Discipline

Colin Woodard, an award-winning author and journalist, is State & National Affairs Writer at the Portland Press Herald and Maine Sunday Telegram, where he recently won a 2012 George Polk Award for his investigative reporting. He is a longtime foreign correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor, The Chronicle of Higher Education and The San Francisco Chronicle. A native of Maine, he has reported from more than fifty foreign countries and six continents, and lived for more than four years in Eastern Europe. He is the author of American Nations: A History of The Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America (Viking Press, 2011), The Republic of Pirates: Being The True and Surprising Story of the Caribbean Pirates and the Man Who Brought Them Down (Harcourt, 2007), the New England bestseller The Lobster Coast: Rebels, Rusticators, and the Struggle for a Forgotten Frontier (Viking Press, 2004), a cultural and environmental history of coastal Maine, and Ocean's End: Travels Through Endangered Seas (Basic Books, 2000), a narrative non-fiction account of the deterioration of the world's oceans. He lives in Midcoast Maine. www.colinwoodard.com

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American Political Economy From the Age of Jackson to the Civil War

American Political Economy From the Age of Jackson to the Civil War

October 19, 20138:00 AM – 6:00 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

This symposium is a forum for reexamination of American political economy from the Age of Jackson to the Civil War during the war's sesquicentennial. It brings together historians of economics, scholars of American political development, and historians of antebellum America and the Civil-War era to debate the originality and continuing relevance of a neglected set of American economic thinkers.

All panels, which are free and open to the public, will be held in the Shannon Room, Hubbard Hall, on Saturday and Sunday, October 19-20, 2013.  For more information, please see the symposium website »

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Local Political Geography and Institutionalized Racial Inequality

Local Political Geography and Institutionalized Racial Inequality

October 23, 20137:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Dr. Allan Parnell will discuss the work he and his non-profit (Cedar Grove Institute) has done in challenging social inequities using GIS and census data. 

Dr. Parnell is a demographer who runs a non-profit demographer who runs a non-profit firm in North Carolina (Cedar Grove Institute); website: http://www.cedargroveinst.org/.  He and his group do research and analyses to provide support for legal cases involving civil rights, predatory lending, segregation in schools, institutionalized discrimination and community economic development.
 
Sponsored by the Department of Sociology/Anthropology, the Environmental Studies Program, the McKeen Center, and Lectures and Concerts.

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Shored Up

Shored Up

October 24, 20137:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Our beaches and coastline are a national treasure, a shared resource, a beacon of sanity in a world of constant change…and they’re disappearing in front of us. Shored Up is a documentary that asks tough questions about coastal communities in the US and their relationships with the land. What will a rising sea do to our homes, our businesses, and the survival of our communities? Can we afford to pile enough sand on our shores to keep the ocean at bay? In Long Beach Island, New Jersey and the Outer Banks of North Carolina, surfers, politicians, scientists, and residents are racing to answer these questions. Beach engineering has been our only approach so far, but is there something else out there to be explored? Highly developed US coastlines puts us in a tough predicament, and it’s time to start looking for solutions.

Following the movie, there will be a question-and-answer session with the producer of the film.

Visit shoredupmovie.com to view the trailer or for more information. This event is possible due to support from the Environmental Studies, Film Studies, Government and Legal Studies, and the Anthropology and Sociology departments, as well as the Sustainability Office, the McKeen Center for the Common Good, and the Bowdoin Green Alliance.

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Voluntary Environmentalists?

Voluntary Environmentalists?

November 6, 20137:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Voluntary Environmentalists: Are green clubs a win for businesses and the environment?
Many companies around the world are participating in voluntary programs that require them to do good things for the environment, even beyond the requirements of government regulations. Some environmentalists worry that these programs are yet more corporate propaganda attempting to greenwash companies' poor environmental records. Supporters see in these programs great potential to improve environmental conditions in an era when gridlock prevents government led solutions. In this talk I will propose an analytic lens that focuses on what problems these programs can solve and what types of rules they need to be effective. Voluntary programs can induce companies to reduce their pollution emissions if they offer a mechanism that credibly signals their superior environmental behavior.

Matthew Potoski is a Professor at the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He teaches courses on corporate environmental management, and his research focuses on management, voluntary environmental programs, and public policy. He co-authored The Voluntary Environmentalists (Cambridge, 2006) and was co-editor of Voluntary Programs (MIT, 2009). He is currently co-editor of the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management and the International Public Management Journal.

Sponsored by the Environmental Studies Program and the McKeen Center for the Common Good, the Bowdoin Globalist, and the Government & Legal Studies Department with support from the John C. Donovan Lecture Fund.

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Slavery, Freedom and the Legacy of the American Revolution

Slavery, Freedom and the Legacy of the American Revolution

November 12, 20134:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Hawthorne Longfellow Hall, Nixon Lounge

Matthew Spooner ('01), ABD, Columbia University, presents Slavery, Freedom and the Legacy of the American Revolution.

This nation was born of a contradiction. The American Revolution, considered as an ideological watershed and as a long and bloody military struggle, led directly to both a new birth of freedom and a great expansion of slavery. Beginning with a discussion of the meaning that the War for Independence had for slaves and free citizens, this talk will reevaluate the impact of the Revolution and explore the twinned rise of slavery and freedom in American History, a complex legacy that we continue to carry in our cities, our prisons, and our foreign wars.

Sponsored by the Departments of History and Africana Studies

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Terms and Conditions May Apply: Screening and Discussion

Terms and Conditions May Apply: Screening and Discussion

November 13, 20134:30 PM – 7:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Panel discussion "Privacy and Security, Transparency and the Internet" following screening of "Terms and Conditions May Apply"

Have you ever read the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policies connected to every website you visit, phone call you make, or app you use? Of course you haven't. But those agreements allow corporations to do things with your personal information you could never even imagine. What are you really agreeing to when you click "I accept"?

Following the screening of "Terms and Conditions May Apply," join Profs. Elias (Government) and Gieseking (Digital and Computational Studies) of Bowdoin, and USM Prof. Clearwater (law) previously of Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet and Society for a discussion of the film and issues of privacy, security, transparency, and the Internet.

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Changing Tides: Perspectives on Sea Level Rise

Changing Tides: Perspectives on Sea Level Rise

November 14, 20137:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

An interdisciplinary panel to consider both the local and global impacts of sea level rise. Government Professor Allen Springer, marine geologist Peter Slovinsky of the Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry in the Maine Geological Survey, and EOS major Cam Adams, '14, will present, highlighting the ways that different governments deal with the issues presented by sea level rise, and what steps are being taken in the Northeast and in Midcoast Maine to combat this problem.

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Winter of Arab Discontent

Winter of Arab Discontent

November 18, 20137:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

As'ad AbuKhalil is a Lebanese-American professor of political science at California State University, Stanislaus. AbuKhalil is the author of Historical Dictionary of Lebanon (1998), Bin Laden, Islam & America's New "War on Terrorism" (2002), and The Battle for Saudi Arabia (2004). He maintains a blog, The Angry Arab News Service. He will be discussing trends in the Middle East in the age of uprising.

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