Location: Bowdoin / German / Courses / Spring 2012

German

Spring 2012

102. Elementary German II
Andrew Erwin M 8:30 - 9:25, W 8:30 - 9:25, F 8:30 - 9:25
Continuation of German 101. Equivalent of German 101 is required.

102. Elementary German II
Andrew Erwin M 1:30 - 2:25, W 1:30 - 2:25, F 1:30 - 2:25
Continuation of German 101. Equivalent of German 101 is required.

152. Berlin: Sin City, Divided City, City of the Future
Jill Smith M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
An examination of literary, artistic, and cinematic representations of the city of Berlin during three distinct time periods: the “Roaring 20s,” the Cold War, and the post-Wall period. Explores the dramatic cultural, political, and physical transformations that Berlin underwent during the twentieth century and thereby illustrates the central role that Berlin played, and continues to play, in European history and culture, as well as in the American cultural imagination. For each time period studied, compares Anglo-American representations of Berlin with those produced by German artists and writers, and investigates how, why, and to what extent Berlin has retained its status as one of the most quintessentially modern cities in the world. No knowledge of German is required.

204. Intermediate German II: German History through Visual Culture
Jill Smith M 8:30 - 9:25, W 8:30 - 9:25, F 8:30 - 9:25
Continuation of German 203. Equivalent of German 203 is required.

204. Intermediate German II: German History through Visual Culture
Jill Smith M 1:30 - 2:25, W 1:30 - 2:25, F 1:30 - 2:25
Continuation of German 203. Equivalent of German 203 is required.

308. Introduction to German Literature and Culture
Steven Cerf T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Designed to be an introduction to the critical reading of texts by genre (e.g., prose fiction and nonfiction, lyric poetry, drama, opera, film) in the context of German intellectual, political, and social history. Focuses on various themes and periods. Develops students’ sensitivity to generic structures and introduces terminology for describing and analyzing texts in historical and cross-cultural contexts. Weekly individual sessions with the Teaching Fellow from the Johannes-Gutenberg-Universität-Mainz.

314. German Romanticism
Steven Cerf T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
Examines the origins of the German Romantic movement in the first half of the nineteenth century and its impact on German culture (e.g., music and the other arts, philosophy, politics, popular culture, continued legacy of Romanticism in subsequent periods of German culture and literature). Focus on representative authors, genres, and themes such as Romantic creativity, genius, horror, and fantasy.

391. Mysticism and Modernist Ethics
Andrew Erwin M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
Artists and intellectuals in early twentieth-century Europe displayed a preoccupation with what they imagined as a distinct experiential realm of ethics. For these individuals, ethics was associated above all with mystical experiences or mystical consciousness. In developing their sense for this realm, some looked to their own experiences and found limitations in normal modes of thought. Others sought insight through reading and translating ancient and medieval mystical texts from both European and non-European cultures. Still others imagined the practice of various art forms as enabling access to the mystical. But whether arrived at experientially, mediated through texts, or explored in artistic practice, early twentieth-century mysticism intersected with many of the most important ethical issues of the day from the events of the First World War and the rise of totalitarian politics to the implications and limits of scientific knowledge. In this course, we will examine different manifestations (in literature, philosophy, painting, music, architecture, and film) of the early twentieth-century preoccupation with mysticism, asking what and how individual, social, historical, and political forces shaped the mystical contours of modernist ethics. Conducted in German.