Spring 2014 Courses

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GER 1102A. Elementary German II.
Steven Cerf.
Continuation of German 1101 (101). Equivalent of German1101 (101) is required.
GER 1102B. Elementary German II.
Steven Cerf.
Continuation of German 1101 (101). Equivalent of German1101 (101) is required.
GER 1152. Berlin: Sin City, Divided City, City of the Future.
Jill Smith.
An examination of literary, artistic, and cinematic representations of the city of Berlin during three distinct time periods: the “Roaring 20s,” the Cold War, and the post-Wall period. Explores the dramatic cultural, political, and physical transformations that Berlin underwent during the twentieth century and thereby illustrates the central role that Berlin played, and continues to play, in European history and culture, as well as in the American cultural imagination. For each time period studied, compares Anglo-American representations of Berlin with those produced by German artists and writers, and investigates how, why, and to what extent Berlin has retained its status as one of the most quintessentially modern cities in the world. No knowledge of German is required.
GER 2204A. Intermediate German II: German History through Visual Culture.
Birgit Tautz.
Continuation of German 2203 (203). Equivalent of German 2203 (203) is required.
GER 2204B. Intermediate German II: German History through Visual Culture.
Birgit Tautz.
Continuation of German 2203 (203). Equivalent of German 2203 (203) is required.
GER 2262. Not Lost in Translation: German Across the Disciplines.
Birgit Tautz.
Designed to explore aspects of contemporary German language and culture beyond literature and film, such as in the contexts of business, politics and law, environmental policy and science. Students acquire cultural competence through specialized linguistic and interpretive skills and appropriate techniques of translation. Focus on discipline-specific genres and discourses (report, prospectus, analysis and briefing papers, etc.) and across media (columns, blogs, television, news, statistics). Combines in-class forms of assessment (quizzes, presentations) with writing assignments and one discipline-specific translation project. All Readings, writing, and discussion in German. Meets with German 3362. German 205 is recommended. Equivalent of German 2204 (204) is required.
GER 3308. Introduction to German Literature and Culture.
Jill Smith.
Designed to be an introduction to the critical reading of texts by genre (e.g., prose fiction and nonfiction, lyric poetry, drama, opera, film) in the context of German intellectual, political, and social history. Focuses on various themes and periods. Develops students’ sensitivity to generic structures and introduces terminology for describing and analyzing texts in historical and cross-cultural contexts. Weekly individual sessions with the Teaching Fellow from the Johannes-Gutenberg-Universität-Mainz. All materials and coursework in German.
GER 3362. Not Lost in Translation: German Across the Disciplines.
Birgit Tautz.
Designed to explore aspects of contemporary German language and culture beyond literature and film, such as in the contexts of business, politics and law, environmental policy and science. Students acquire cultural competence through specialized linguistic and interpretive skills and appropriate techniques of translation. Focus on discipline-specific genres and discourses (report, prospectus, analysis and briefing papers, etc.) and across media (columns, blogs, television, news, statistics). Combines forms of in-class assessment (quizzes, presentations) with concise papers of different genres, discipline-specific translation and individual and/or group research projects. Meets with German 2262. One previous 3000-level course in German recommended. Equivalent of German 2204 (204) is required.
GER 3392. Das deutsche Lustspiel.
Steven Cerf.
An examination of selected masterworks of the rare and problematic German-language comedy from the Enlightenment to Post-Unification in historical and cultural contexts. Particular attention is paid to the comedic works of Lessing, Kleist, Wagner, Hofmannsthal, Zuckmayer, Dürrenmatt and Levy. Three questions are posed: (1) Why are there so few German literary comedies? (2) How did German comedic writers—with their attention to psychological, historical, and sociological detail—form their own tradition in which they responded to each other over two centuries? (3) To what extent did writers from other cultures inspire German comedic playwrights? In addition to a close reading of texts, filmed stage productions and cinematic adaptations are examined. All materials and coursework in German.