Fall 2013 Courses

  • Please note that for the 2013-14 academic year, official course numbers are now four digits. This page only shows the older three-digit course numbers. If you need to see both the old and the new numbers, consult the College Catalogue.
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101. Elementary German I
Jill Smith M 8:30 - 9:25, W 8:30 - 9:25, F 8:30 - 9:25
German 1101 {101} is the first course in German language and culture and is open to all students without prerequisite. Facilitates an understanding of culture through language. Introduces German history and cultural topics. Three hours per week. Acquisition of four skills: speaking and understanding, reading, and writing. One hour of conversation and practice with teaching assistant. Integrated language laboratory work.
101. Elementary German I
Jill Smith M 1:30 - 2:25, W 1:30 - 2:25, F 1:30 - 2:25
German 1101 {101} is the first course in German language and culture and is open to all students without prerequisite. Facilitates an understanding of culture through language. Introduces German history and cultural topics. Three hours per week. Acquisition of four skills: speaking and understanding, reading, and writing. One hour of conversation and practice with teaching assistant. Integrated language laboratory work.
151. The Literary Imagination and the Holocaust
Steven Cerf M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
An examination of the literary treatment of the Holocaust, a period between 1933 and 1945, during which eleven million innocent people were systematically murdered by the Nazis. Four different literary genres are examined: the diary and memoir, drama, poetry, and the novel. Three basic sets of questions are raised by the course: How could such slaughter take place in the twentieth century? To what extent is literature capable of evoking this period and what different aspects of the Holocaust are stressed by the different genres? What can our study of the Holocaust teach us with regard to contemporary issues surrounding totalitarianism and racism? No knowledge of German is required.
203. Intermediate German I: Germany within Europe
Steven Cerf M 8:30 - 9:25, W 8:30 - 9:25, F 8:30 - 9:25
Continued emphasis on the understanding of German culture through language. Focus on social and cultural topics through history, literature, politics, popular culture, and the arts. Three hours per week of reading, speaking, and writing. One hour of discussion and practice with teaching assistant. Language laboratory also available. Equivalent of German 1102 {102} is required.
203. Intermediate German I: Germany within Europe
Steven Cerf M 1:30 - 2:25, W 1:30 - 2:25, F 1:30 - 2:25
Continued emphasis on the understanding of German culture through language. Focus on social and cultural topics through history, literature, politics, popular culture, and the arts. Three hours per week of reading, speaking, and writing. One hour of discussion and practice with teaching assistant. Language laboratory also available. Equivalent of German 1102 {102} is required.
205. Advanced German Texts and Contexts
Birgit Tautz T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Designed to explore aspects of German culture in depth, to deepen the understanding of culture through language, and to increase facility in speaking, writing, reading, and comprehension. Topics include post-war and/or post-unification themes in historical and cross-cultural contexts. Particular emphasis on post-1990 German youth culture and language. Includes fiction writing, film, music, and various news media. Weekly individual sessions with the Teaching Fellow from the Johannes-Gutenberg-Universität-Mainz. Equivalent of German 2204 {204} is required.
313. German Classicism
Birgit Tautz T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
Focus on the mid-to late eighteenth century as an age of contradictory impulses (e.g., the youthful revolt of Storm and Stress against the Age of Reason). Examines manifestations of such impulses—e.g., ghosts, love, and other transgressions—in the works of major (e.g., Goethe, Schiller) and less well–known (e.g., Karsch, Forster) authors . Beginning with discussions of transparency, examines the ghostly and spiritual moments of "Faustian bargains" (Goethe's Urfaust), transgressive desires in poetry, travel texts, and love letters as well as in secret societies, and concludes with emergent, phantasmic technologies (Schiller's Geisterseher) and manifestations of the irrational in nature's chaos (Kleist Das Erdbeben in Chili). Investigation of texts in their broader cultural context with appropriate theory and illustrated through film and drama on video, statistical data, developments in eighteenth-century dance, music, and legal discourse." All materials and coursework in German.
397. Global Germany?
Jill Smith M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
The fall of the Berlin Wall and the concomitant end of the Cold War ushered in what many cultural critics call “the era of globalization.” An exploration of how contemporary German culture (1990–present) grapples with both the possibilities and uncertainties presented by globalization. Examines a myriad of cultural texts—films, audio plays, dramas, short fiction, novels, photographs, websites—as well as mass events (i.e., the Love Parade, the 2006 World Cup) within their political, social, and economic contexts to show how Germany’s troubled past continues to affect the role it plays on the global stage and how its changing demographics—increased urbanization and ethnic diversity—have altered its cultural and literary landscape. Critically considers issues such as migration, terrorism and genocide, sex tourism, the formation of the European Union and the supposed decline of the nation-state. Frequent short writings, participation in debates, and a final research project based upon a relevant topic of individual interest are required. All materials and course work in German.