Location: Bowdoin / German / Courses / Fall 2010

German

Fall 2010

029. Historians, Comediennes, Storytellers: Women Filmmakers in the German-Speaking Countries
Birgit Tautz T  1:00 - 2:25
TH 1:00 - 2:25
Examines the work of women filmmakers in the German-speaking countries since the 1960s. Explores key interests of these directors: the telling of stories and (German, European, global) histories, the exploration of gender identity, sexuality, and various waves of feminism, the portrayal of women, the participation in the cinematic conventions of Hollywood as well as independent and avant-garde film, spectatorship. Analyzes a range of films and cinematic genres—to include narrative cinema, biography, documentary, and comedy. Also introduces students to film criticism; includes weekly film screenings. No knowledge of German required.

101. Elementary German I
Jill Smith M  8:30 - 9:25
W  8:30 - 9:25
F  8:30 - 9:25
German 101 is the first course in German language and culture and is open to all students without prerequisite. Facilitates an understanding of culture through language. Introduces German history and cultural topics. Three hours per week. Acquisition of four skills: speaking and understanding, reading, and writing. One hour of conversation and practice with teaching assistant. Integrated language laboratory work.

101. Elementary German I
Jill Smith M  1:30 - 2:25
W  1:30 - 2:25
F  1:30 - 2:25
German 101 is the first course in German language and culture and is open to all students without prerequisite. Facilitates an understanding of culture through language. Introduces German history and cultural topics. Three hours per week. Acquisition of four skills: speaking and understanding, reading, and writing. One hour of conversation and practice with teaching assistant. Integrated language laboratory work.

151. The Literary Imagination and the Holocaust
Steven Cerf M  10:30 - 11:25
W  10:30 - 11:25
F  10:30 - 11:25
An examination of the literary treatment of the Holocaust, a period between 1933 and 1945, during which eleven million innocent people were systematically murdered by the Nazis. Four different literary genres are examined: the diary and memoir, drama, poetry, and the novel. Three basic sets of questions are raised by the course: How could such slaughter take place in the twentieth century? To what extent is literature capable of evoking this period and what different aspects of the Holocaust are stressed by the different genres? What can our study of the Holocaust teach us with regard to contemporary issues surrounding totalitarianism and racism? No knowledge of German is required.

203. Intermediate German I: Germany within Europe
Steven Cerf M  8:30 - 9:25
W  8:30 - 9:25
F  8:30 - 9:25
Continued emphasis on the understanding of German culture through language. Focus on social and cultural topics through history, literature, politics, popular culture, and the arts. Three hours per week of reading, speaking, and writing. One hour of discussion and practice with teaching assistant. Language laboratory also available. Equivalent of German 102 is required.

203. Intermediate German I: Germany within Europe
Steven Cerf M  1:30 - 2:25
W  1:30 - 2:25
F  1:30 - 2:25
Continued emphasis on the understanding of German culture through language. Focus on social and cultural topics through history, literature, politics, popular culture, and the arts. Three hours per week of reading, speaking, and writing. One hour of discussion and practice with teaching assistant. Language laboratory also available. Equivalent of German 102 is required.

205. Advanced German Texts and Contexts
Birgit Tautz T  10:00 - 11:25
TH 10:00 - 11:25
Designed to explore aspects of German culture in depth, to deepen the understanding of culture through language, and to increase facility in speaking, writing, reading, and comprehension. Topics include post-war and/or post-unification themes in historical and cross-cultural contexts. Particular emphasis on post-1990 German youth culture and language. Includes fiction writing, film, music, and various news media. Weekly individual sessions with the Teaching Fellow from the Johannes-Gutenberg-Universität-Mainz. Equivalent of German 204 is required.

315. Realism and Revolution in Nineteenth-Century German Literature and Culture
Jill Smith M  11:30 - 12:25
W  11:30 - 12:25
F  11:30 - 12:25
What is revolution? What forms has it taken within German-speaking society and culture? Examines a variety of literary, cultural, and social texts from 1830 to 1900 in their broader cultural, artistic, philosophical, and political contexts. Beyond discussing the effects (both positive and negative) of the Industrial Revolution, discusses three other forms of revolution that emerge in nineteenth-century German discourse: 1) political revolution (the formation of German national identity; the rise of the socialist movement); 2) artistic revolution (the search for an artistic direction at the end of the Age of Goethe; the tensions between social realism and romanticism); 3) sexual revolution (scientific interest in “normal” vs. “abnormal” sexual behavior; the advent of the women’s movement and the questioning of gender roles). Authors/artists may include Heine, Büchner, Hebbel, Hauptmann, Andreas-Salomé, Fontane, Wagner, Marx & Engels, Bebel, Simmel, Kollwitz, Krafft-Ebing.

321. Before and After the Wall: East German Traditions in Literature, Culture, and Film
Helen Cafferty T  11:30 - 12:55
TH 11:30 - 12:55
Understanding texts and traditions unique to the culture of the GDR can lead to a greater understanding of discussions about politics and culture in today's united Federal Republic. At the same time literary achievements by East German writers also stand on their own: We will read examples of works by celebrated East German authors, like Christa Wolf, Heiner Müller, and Jurek Becker, who were acclaimed by both Eastern and Western literary establishments as well as address popular and important East German films, drawing on the extensive DEFA film collection owned by the College(e.g. Berlin Ecke Schönhauser( Kleinert), Die Legende von Paul und Paula (Carow), Solo Sunny (Wolf), Jakob der Lügner (Becker). Literary culture played an important substitute role (Ersatzrolle) in creating discourses about politics and society in the GDR, which muzzled the media and freedom of speech in the attempt to control and manipulate opinion through censorship. We will address the unique cultural politics (Kulturpolitik) in the GDR by using the popular Liedemacher Wolf Biermann as a case study. Other themes in the course include GDR iterations of anti-fascism and resistance to Nazi persecution, GDR Frauenliteratur, Aufbau des Sozialismus.Additional authors may include: Seghers, Plenzdorf, Brasch, Kohlhaase, Braun, Emersleben, among others. Students will have the opportunity to do a final project on a Post-Wende writer or filmmaker who draws upon East German tradition(s).