Calendar of Events

Environmental Justice: At the Crossroads with Public Health, Conservation Politics, and Generational Change

Environmental Justice: At the Crossroads with Public Health, Conservation Politics, and Generational Change

February 8, 2014 10:00 AM  – 4:00 PM
Schwartz Outdoor Leadership, Beebe Room

Schwartz Outdoor Leadership, Beebe Room

This program will bring together practitioners and experts in the environmental justice movement who will focus on the interconnected issues of environmental health, and conservation politics. Speakers and participants will also explore and discuss the importance of equity, inclusiveness and diversity for the future of the environmental movement and social change.

Angela Park will be the keynote speaker. Ms. Park is the founder and executive director of Diversity Matters (soon to be Mission Critical), a Fellow of the Sustainability Institute's Donella Meadows Leadership Program, and author of Everybody's Movement: Environmental Justice and Climate Change. Ms. Park is a writer and a consultant to non-profits, governments, foundations, and companies. Much of her work focuses on the integration of social, environmental, and economic issues, and she is a leading expert on equity and diversity in the environmental field in the United States.

This symposium is free to Bowdoin students, staff, and faculty. A $10 registration fee to cover lunch is asked of other participants.

REGISTER HERE.

For more information please contact Rosie Armstrong, 207-725-3396, rarmstro@bowdoin.edu.

CO-SPONSORED BY the Departments of Africana Studies, Earth & Oceanographic Science, Gender & Women's Studies, Government & Legal Studies, History, Math, Philosophy, the Asian Studies Program, Environmental Studies Program, the McKeen Center, and Sustainable Bowdoin.

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Zen Browne Exhibit

Zen Browne Exhibit

February 12, 2014 8:30 AM  – 6:00 PM
Blue Gallery

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CANCELLED: For the Rights of All: Jim Crow in Alaska

CANCELLED: For the Rights of All: Jim Crow in Alaska

February 13, 2014 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

DUE TO POOR WEATHER CONDITIONS, THIS FILM SCREENING HAS BEEN CANCELLED. This documentary reveals the true-life story of an extraordinary Alaskan woman who became an unlikely hero in the fight for civil rights.

Free.

Sponsored by the Russell and Janet Doubleday Endowment.

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Film Screening: "Free Angela and All Political Prisoners" (2012)

Film Screening: "Free Angela and All Political Prisoners" (2012)

February 13, 2014 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Cleaveland 151

Black History Month Film Festival

A documentary that chronicles the life of young college professor Angela Davis, and how her social activism implicates her in a botched kidnapping attempt that ends with a shootout, four dead, and her name on the FBI's 10 Most Wanted list.

102 min.

Brought to you by Africana Studies and the African American Society

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Vagina Monologues

Vagina Monologues

February 14, 2014 7:30 PM  – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

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Vagina Monologues

Vagina Monologues

February 15, 2014 7:30 PM  – 10:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

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World Cinema Film Festival: "Blancanieves"

World Cinema Film Festival: "Blancanieves"

February 23, 2014 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Bowdoin's World Cinema Film Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students.

Blancanieves (Pablo Berger, Spain, 2012) is presented by Elena Cueto-Asin (Romance Languages), Tricia Welsch (Film Studies), Birgit Tautz (German), and MacMillan House. This wonderfully eerie silent film treat and Oscar nominee  recasts Snow White as a talented bullfighter in 1920s southern Spain.

A post-screening reception will be provided by the students of MacMillan House.

Official Trailer

For more information, contact the Film Studies Program at (207) 725-3552.

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A Reading by Author Jennifer Finney Boylan

A Reading by Author Jennifer Finney Boylan

February 24, 2014 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Writer and activist Jennifer Finney Boylan has published twelve books, including a collection of short stories, three novels, a number of books for young adults, and her autobiography She's Not There: A Life in Two Genders, the first book by a transgender American to become a bestseller.

Her most recent book is a memoir about "parenthood in three genders," Stuck in the Middle With You, scheduled for publication by Random House.

Jennifer Finney Boylan has worked with the original cast of Saturday Night Live, as managing editor of American Bystander magazine, and also has served on the editorial staffs at Penguin Books, Viking Press, and E.P. Dutton Inc. She is currently a professor of English at Colby College in Waterville, Maine.

Sponsored by the English Department.

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Zen Browne Exhibit

Zen Browne Exhibit

February 26, 2014 8:30 AM  – 6:00 PM
Blue Gallery

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Tallman Lecture with Susan Faludi

Tallman Lecture with Susan Faludi

February 27, 2014 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Feminism, Interrupted: Why Can't the Women's Movement Pass Down Power?

Susan Faludi, Tallman Scholar in Gender and Women's Studies, is a Pulitzer-Prize-winning journalist and the author of the bestselling Backlash: The Undeclared War Against American Women, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction, and Stiffed: The Betrayal of the American Man. In her most recent book, The Terror Dream: Myth and Misogyny in an Insecure America, she examines the post-9/11 outpouring in the media, popular culture, and political life. Faludi's work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, and The Nation, among other publications.

Open to the public free of charge. For more information call 207-725-3928. Sponsored by the Tallman Lecture Fund.

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Uncanny Returns: Literary Zionism and Modernism (Joyce, Spark and Roth)

Uncanny Returns: Literary Zionism and Modernism (Joyce, Spark and Roth)

March 27, 2014 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

In 1896, Max Nordau's Degeneration lodged a diatribe against the modernist aesthetic, that its formal innovations were reflective of a pathological instability of its authors.  Such a charge mirrored anti-Semitism's vilified stereotype of the wandering Jew.  Nordau would go on to produce one of the underwriting tracts of Zionism.  "Muscular Judaism," which proffered a countertype of fitness.  Zionism was one of several nascent nationalist movements in the period of Modernism's development at the turn of the twentieth century, and after, championed, questioned and interpolated by several writers on the continent, Great Britain, and the United States.  This talk will consider a few of these, including James Joyce, Muriel Spark and Philip Roth, all of whom would qualify for Nordau's hit list of damnable authors.  A Perspectives on Israel event.

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A Reading by Author Russ Rymer

A Reading by Author Russ Rymer

March 31, 2014 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Author and journalist Russ Rymer will read selections from his recent work.

Rymer has contributed to the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, The New Yorker, National Geographic, Harper's, Smithsonian, Vogue, and Los Angeles Magazine, among others.

His recently published (2013) third book, his first novel, is Paris Twilight.

Rymer's first book, Genie, a Scientific Tragedy, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and a Whiting Writers' Award winner, was published in 1993.  Rymer's second book was American Beach (1998) about Florida's American Beach community.

Rymer is currently a visiting writer in the Bowdoin College English Department.

He has been the Joan Leiman Jacobson Non-Fiction Writer in Residence at Smith College, the Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Foundation Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, a lecturer in Writing and Humanistic Studies and at the Graduate Program in Science Writing at MIT, a visiting professor at the University of California at Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism, an instructor at the California Institute of Technology, and Distinguished Writer in Residence at St. Mary's College in Moraga, California.

Rymer was appointed as a Guggenheim Fellow in 2002 and awarded the Ed Cunningham Award for best magazine reporting from abroad by the Overseas Press Club in 2013.

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Discussion and Screening of "The Garden" with Director Scott Kennedy Hamilton

Discussion and Screening of  "The Garden" with Director Scott Kennedy Hamilton

March 31, 2014 7:30 PM  – 9:30 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Scott Hamilton Kennedy comes to Bowdoin for a discussion and screening of his 2008 Oscar-nominated documentary The Garden. Kennedy's film tells the story of South Central Farm, a community garden and urban farm in Los Angeles. When the landowner decides he no longer wants the farm on his property, the working class families who created and work on South Central Farm protest - confronting a web of backroom land development deals, green politics, and corruption.

Indiewire says of The Garden: "(the film) exposes the fault lines in American society and raises crucial and challenging questions about liberty, equality, and justice for the poorest and most vulnerable among us."

Includes appearances by Danny Glover, Daryl Hannah, Willie Nelson, and Joan Baez.

The Garden website

Sponsored by Lectures and Concerts, the Film Studies Program, the Environmental Studies Program, the Latin American Studies Program, the Center for the Common Good, the Africana Studies Program, and the English Department.

Contact the Film Studies Program at 725-3552 for more information.

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The Uncondemned: The Prosecution of Rape at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda

The  Uncondemned:  The Prosecution of Rape at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda

April 8, 2014 7:30 PM  – 10:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Cleaveland 151

5.3 From April through July 1994, many Tutsi men, women and children were attacked, abducted, raped and massacred in their residences or at their places of shelter or arrested, detained and later murdered. The Accused commanded, organized, supervised and participated in these attacks.

5.4 These attackers, comprising the members of the Police Communale, Gendarmerie Nationale and Interahamwe militia who were under the control of the Accused, used guns, grenades, machetes, spears, pangas, cudgels and other weapons to slaughter the Tutsis.

5.5 The Accused ordered and witnessed the raping and other sexual assaults on the Tutsi females. At all times material to this indictment, the Accused, as a person in authority over the attackers failed to take any measure to stop these nefarious acts on the Tutsi females. The Accused is responsible for the rape of Tutsi(s) as part of a widespread and systematic attack against a civilian population on political, ethnic or racial grounds, and thereby committed CRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY, pursuant to Article 3(g) and punishable in reference to Articles 22 and 23 of the Statute of the International Criminal Tribunal of Rwanda.

Join co-producer, director and writer Michele Mitchell on Tuesday, April 8 at 7:30 PM in Cleaveland 151 to discuss "The Uncondemned:  The Prosecution of Rape at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda." 

Michele Mitchell is the executive editor of Film at Eleven and the filmmaker behind the PBS special “Haiti: Where Did the Money Go?” which won the National Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Television Documentary, the Gracie Award for Best Investigative Documentary, the CINE Special Jury Award for Best Investigative Feature and the CINE Golden Eagle for Investigative Feature, among other honors. She recently complete work as co-director of “The Water War” which is currently in post-production.

 Previously, she was the investigative correspondent on “NOW with Bill Moyers” (PBS), where she won a Gracie Award and an honorary citation at the Overseas Press Awards, and political anchor at CNN Headline News. She is the author of three books and has written for the New York Times, Washington Post, and “All Things Considered” on NPR. A graduate of Northwestern University, she began her career on Capitol Hill.

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AIDS is a Kinship Disease: Orphan Care and the Changing Family in Lesotho

AIDS is a Kinship Disease: Orphan Care and the Changing Family in Lesotho

April 14, 2014 6:00 PM  – 8:00 PM
Adams Hall, Room 208

In Ellen Block's talk, titled AIDS is a Kinship Disease: Orphan Care and the Changing Family in Lesotho, she argues that AIDS is best understood through its definitive connections with kinship practices as its impact reaches beyond the individual who is sick, transforming families and reflecting broader concerns about societal change. Rather than simply maintaining that people respond to the problem of AIDS by drawing on sociality and cultural ideologies, she argues that AIDS is at the center of a crisis in African kinship and that orphan care provides a lens through which to examine the complex webs of belief, social relations, biomedical practices, and structural realities which characterize the crisis. She will illuminate two key areas where this relational view of AIDS is exhibited and where the intersections of AIDS and kinship is revealed.  First, she discusses the way in which biomedical knowledge is filtered through a social lens in order to shape Basotho’s understanding of AIDS’ impact on the body.  Second, she explores how the presence of AIDS orphans has changed household configurations.  She will show how the negotiations for AIDS orphans has served to simultaneously reinforce patrilineal and patriarchal values, while fundamentally shifting caregiving practices to favor matrilocality.

Sponsored by the Departments of Sociology & Anthropology, Gender & Women's Studies, and the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund

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Criminal Births: Infanticide, Stillbirth and the Rio de Janeiro Police, 1890-1940

Criminal Births: Infanticide, Stillbirth and the Rio de Janeiro Police, 1890-1940

April 17, 2014 4:00 PM  – 5:30 PM
Edward Pols House, Conference Room

During Brazil's First Republic (1889-1930) and into the early Vargas era (1930-1937) in the capital city of Rio de Janeiro, police were involved in poor women's reproductive lives. Scholars studying women's reproductive practices in Brazil during that time period have conducted narrow examinations of legal documents pertaining to abortion, infanticide, and child abandonment. On the contrary, Cassia Roth ('08) will demonstrate that police investigations conflated fertility control practices such as abortion and infanticide with non-criminal occurrences like miscarriage and stillbirth. She will delineate the expansion of a de facto criminality surrounding practices related to and often confused with fertility control under the 1890 Penal Code (1890-1940) and contend that the police investigated the unfortunate but common occurrences of stillbirths as possible infanticides. Drawing on police investigations of infanticide, stillbirths, and birth-related infant deaths in Rio de Janeiro, Cassia argues that the state's incursion into poor women's reproductive lives transformed events like a difficult delivery or a stillbirth into potential crimes.

Join us for this lecture
Thursday, April 17, 4:15 pm
Edward Pols House Seminar Room


Cassia Roth '08 is a Ph.D. Candidate in History, UCLA

Free and open to the public. Sponsored by the Latin American Studies Program, Gender and Women's Studies Program, and the History Department.

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Human Trafficking Q&A

Human Trafficking Q&A

April 24, 2014 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Thorne Hall, Pinette Dining Room

June Guo will share insights from her recent experience attending the Not Here conference on Human Trafficking. She will be joined by a panel of faculty and other concerned students to answer questions, examine the local and global dimensions of the problem, and discuss what Bowdoin can do to make a difference on this issue.

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Must Mediterranean Men be Masculine? Reflections on a Stereotype

Must Mediterranean Men be Masculine? Reflections on a Stereotype

April 24, 2014 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Michael Herzfeld is Ernest E. Monrad Professor of the Social Sciences in the Department of Anthropology at Harvard University, where he has taught since 1991. The author of ten books -- including A Place in History (1991), Cultural Intimacy (1997), The Body Impolitic (2004), and Evicted from Eternity (2009) -- and numerous articles and reviews, he has also produced two ethnographic films (Monti Moments[2007] and Roman Restaurant Rhythms [2011]). His honors include the J.I. Staley Prize and the Rivers Memorial Medal (both in 1994) and honorary doctorates from the Université Libre de Bruxelles (2005), the University of Macedonia, Thessaloniki (2011), and the University of Crete (2013). He has served as editor of American Ethnologist (1995-98) and is currently editor-at-large (responsible for "Polyglot Perspectives") at Anthropological Quarterly. He is also a member of the editorial boards of several journals, including International Journal of Heritage Studies, Anthropology Today, and South East Asia Research. His research in Greece, Italy, and Thailand has addressed the social and political impact of historic conservation and gentrification, the dynamics of nationalism and bureaucracy, and the ethnography of knowledge among artisans and intellectuals. He is currently working on a book and a film about the politics of heritage and spatiality in Bangkok.

Sponsored by the Mellon Initiative in Mediterranean Studies.

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Queering Chinese 'Comrades': Film Screening & Discussion

Queering Chinese 'Comrades': Film Screening & Discussion

April 28, 2014 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Monday, April 28
7:00 - 9:30 p.m.
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Cui Zien is China's first independent queer filmmaker and an outspoken queer activist. Queering Chinese 'Comrades' presents a comprehensive historical account of queer culture in China for the last 30 years. The documentary uses exclusive interviews and original film footage to examine how shifting attitudes in law, media, and education have transformed queer culture from an unspeakable taboo to an accepted social identity.

Sponsored by Lectures and Concerts, Asian Studies Program, Film Studies, and Gay & Lesbian Studies.

Free and open to the public.

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Dana Renga: Mafia, Masculinity, Melodrama

Dana Renga: Mafia, Masculinity, Melodrama

May 2, 2014 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Dana Renga, Assistant Professor of Italian at The Ohio State University, will discuss the ways in which the conventions of melodrama shape the mafia movie, focusing in particular on the Italian box-office hit Romanzo criminale (Michele Placido, 2005). Melodramatic narratives, argues Prof. Renga, create sympathy for the mafia film's brooding anti-hero - a sympathy that is increased when these characters are played by the likes of Italian film idols Kim Rossi Stuart and Riccardo Scamarcio. In "Mafia, Masculinity, Melodrama" Prof. Renga examines how such films cause their viewers to forgive the transgressions of their criminal protagonists, and even mourn their deaths.

Prof. Renga works on modern and contemporary Italian cinema and culture, including representations of the Mafia, gender, the holocaust, fascism and terrorism. She has published articles and book chapters on Italian cinema, popular culture, poetry, and literature. She is the author of Unfinished Business: Screening the Italian Mafia in the New Millennium (University of Toronto Press, 2013), the editor of Mafia Movies: A Reader (University of Toronto Press, 2011) and co-edits The Italianist: Film Issue. She is currently at work on a book entitled Italian Women's Cinema and the Wounded Filmic Body (1915-2015).

This lecture is sponsored by the Bowdoin College Department of Romance Languages, Film Studies Program, Department of English, and Gender and Women's Studies Program, with additional funding from the Lectures and Concerts Committee and Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund.

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