Calendar of Events

Jack Gieseking Book Launch: "People, Place, Space Reader"

Jack Gieseking Book Launch: "People, Place, Space Reader"

September 10, 20144:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Join Jack Gieseking, Bowdoin’s New Media and Data Visualization Specialist, at the launching of her book “The People, Place, and Space Reader". Edited by Dr. Gieseking and William Mangold, the book brings together the writings of scholars from a variety of fields to make sense of the ways we shape and inhabit our world. An essential resource for students of urban studies, geography, design, sociology, and anyone with an interest in the environment, this volume presents the most dynamic and critical understanding of space and place available.

Professor Matt Klingle will serve as interlocutor, facilitating a discussion of the book.

With a B.A. from Mt Holyoke, an M.A. from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. from CUNY, Dr. Gieseking joined the faculty at Bowdoin in Fall 2013.

Sponsored by Bowdoin's Digital and Computational Studies Initiative.

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And Still We Rise [Davis Robinson]

And Still We Rise [Davis Robinson]

September 27, 20147:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

"And Still WeRise Productions" (www.andstillwerise.org) was founded in 2005 as an outgrowth of a series of "emotional literacy"workshops sponsored by the Houses of Healing Project (www.lionheart.org)  at the Suffolk County Jail in Boston, theAriel Group’s Outreach Program (www.arielgroup.com),  and the Side-by-Side Community Circle, areintegration program created to help former inmates successfully find theirway back into society.

"And Still We Rise"is a vibrant community of theater artists and social justice advocates.  Now in its tenth season of performances andworkshops, ASWR is led by men and women who have spent years in prison.Together with their family members and loved-ones, they use the art ofstorytelling to create a crucible for healing, public awareness, and socialchange through empowering the voices of formerly incarcerated individuals.

Weavingtheir stories into an imaginative fabric built on true experience, performers move audiences toward greater understanding and compassion for those- both inside and out - whose lives have been directly impacted by the prisonsystem.

Sponsored by the Department of Theater and Dance, withgenerous support from  the Alice CooperMorse Fund for the Performing Arts.

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Laura McClure: "Women and Theater in Classical Athens"

Laura McClure: "Women and Theater in Classical Athens"

October 1, 20147:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Laura McClure is Jane Ellen Harrison Professor of Classics at the University of Wisconsin.  Professor McClure received her Ph.D. in Classical Languages and Literatures from the University of Chicago in 1991. Her research interests include Athenian drama, the study of women in the ancient world, and classical reception. Her books focus on representations of women in Athenian drama: Spoken Like a Woman: Speech and Gender in Athenian Drama (Princeton, 1999) and Courtesans at Table: Gender and Greek Literary Culture in Athenaeus (Routledge 2003). She has edited three volumes on the subject of women in antiquity, including Making Silence Speak: Women's Voices in Greek Literature and Society, with Andre Lardinois (Princeton, 2001), Prostitutes and Courtesans in the Ancient World, with C. A. Faraone (Wisconsin, 2006), and Sexuality and Gender in the Classical World (Blackwell, 2008). She has published numerous articles, most recently an analysis of the role of women in tragic recognition scenes. She is currently completing a textbook about women in ancient Greece and Rome (under contract with Blackwell). While on research leave in 2014-15, she plans to work on a new project on women and memory in Greek tragedy. She regularly teaches advanced Greek language courses, Women and Gender in the Classical World, Civilization of Ancient Greece, and Ancient Drama in translation.


Sponsored by the Mellon Humanities Initiative--Studies in the Mediterranean, the Jasper Jacob Stahl Lectureship Fund, and the Department of Classics.

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Ryan Cordell Lecture "Viral Texts and the Technologies of Authorship"

Ryan Cordell Lecture "Viral Texts and the Technologies of Authorship"

October 6, 20147:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Ryan Cordell will draw on the Viral Texts project at Northeastern University (http://www.viraltexts.org) to demonstrate how computational methods such as text mining, mapping, and network analysis can illuminate nineteenth-century systems of circulation, reprinting, and remediation systemically and at scale. Dr. Cordell’s project focuses on the viral culture that enlivened nineteenth-century periodical production, distribution, and consumption. Though the term “viral culture” is new, many of the practices it describes—especially the sharing, remixing, and repurposing of cultural materials—emerged long before the twenty-first century.

Ryan Cordell is Assistant Professor of English at Northeastern University and Core Founding Faculty Member in the NULab for Texts, Maps, and Networks. His scholarship focuses on convergences among literary, periodical, and religious culture in antebellum American mass media.

This lecture is underwritten by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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Film: The Secret of the Grain

Film: The Secret of the Grain

October 15, 20147:30 PM – 10:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

The Secret of the Grain (French: La graineet le mulet, also released internationally as Couscous) is a 2007Franco-Tunisian drama film directed by Abdellatif Kechiche. The film starsHabib Boufares as an aging immigrant from the Maghreb whose ambition toestablish a successful restaurant as an inheritance for his large and disparatefamily meets skeptical opposition from the French bureaucracy. 

The screening is organized in conjunction with the upcomingexhibition Revealing Mediterranean Women at the Bowdoin CollegeMuseum of Art, and other activities around the topic of gender and sexualitiesin the Mediterranean. 

It will be followed by a conversation with Hanétha Vété-Congolo (French) Russell Hopley (Arabic) and Amina Ben Ismail(17’). 

Open to the public free of charge. For more information call207-725-3782. Sponsored by the Mellon Initiative in Mediterranean Studies.

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Class Discussion and Coffee with Fatuma Hussein

Class Discussion and Coffee with Fatuma Hussein

October 20, 20144:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Adams Hall, Room 111 (Common Room)

Join Professor Femi Vaughan in welcoming Fatuma Hussein, CEO and Founder of the United Somali Women of Maine

Ms. Hussein will lead a class discussion in Prof. Vaughan's Transnational Africa and Globalization course on Monday, October 20 in Adams 202. 

Afterward, gather for coffee and conversation with the professor and Ms. Hussein in the common room of Adams Hall's 1st floor. 

Refreshments will be served.

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Helena Goscilo, "Seeing Red: Soviet Women in Graphic Form"

Helena Goscilo, "Seeing Red: Soviet Women in Graphic Form"

October 23, 20147:00 PM – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Helena Goscilo is Professor of Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures at The Ohio State University. Her areas of expertise include Russian culture, esp. 20th and 21st century; visual culture, especially art, graphics, and film; film adaptation; gender; Russian folklore; the Russian novel; Bakhtin; Romanticism; representations of war; and Russian capitals (Petersburg and Moscow).

Lecture topic: The Soviet poster, which addressed the broad masses, was a genre ideally suited to the state's imperative of molding Soviet identity and everyday values while propagating the political ideology that fueled them. Goscilo examines the genre's convergence with official dicta in its assignment of gender roles, focusing primarily on the Soviet era. She takes into account the relationship between women's functions and achievements as urged or claimed by posters, on the one hand, and their everyday reality, on the other.

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The Alfred E Golz Memorial Lecture: "Democracy at the Roots: Understanding Haiti's Political Culture" - Streamed LIVE

The Alfred E Golz Memorial Lecture: "Democracy at the Roots: Understanding Haiti's Political Culture" - Streamed LIVE

October 23, 20147:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Laurent Dubois is the Marcello Lotti Professor of Romance Studies and History at Duke University. He is the author of several books on the history and culture of the French Caribbean and Atlantic World, including Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution (2004), A Colony of Citizens: Revolution and Slave Emancipation in the French Caribbean, 1787-1804 (2004), and his latest work, Haiti: The Aftershocks of History (2012). He also has an interest in the relationship between sports and politics. In 2010 he published Soccer Empire: The World Cup and the Future of France. He is currently preparing a book manuscript on the history of the banjo, for which he has received several awards, including a Mellon New Directions Fellowship, and fellowships from the National Humanities Center and the Guggenheim Foundation. Professor Dubois also served as head historical consultant for a PBS documentary on the Haitian Revolution, which premiered in 2009.

Professor Dubois's upcoming Golz lecture, "Democracy at the Roots: Understanding Haiti's Political Culture," explores three intertwined legacies of the Haitian Revolution on political thought and practice in the country: the largely hostile reaction to it outside the country, the formation of new political institutions and structures, and -- most importantly -- the creation of a new set of cultural, social, and economic structures that Jean Casimir has called the “counter-plantation” system. He identifies both the main currents and critical counter-currents within each of these legacies, calling attention to the aspects of the latter legacies that seem to him to be the most valuable and worth comprehending and nourishing in constructing new Haitian futures.

This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin's Live Webcasts page.

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Sujata Moorti: "Mothers, Inc.: The Racial Politics of Transnational Surrogacy"

Sujata Moorti: "Mothers, Inc.: The Racial Politics of Transnational Surrogacy"

October 28, 20144:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Mothers, Inc.: The Racial Politics of Transnational Surrogacy

Sujata Moorti is Professor of Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies at Middlebury College. She has published extensively on media representations of gender, sexuality and diasporic formations. She is currently completing a manuscript on iFeminism where she teases out the ways in which social media are altering understandings of feminism around the world. In this manuscript she explores the transnational circuits of activism and knowledge production that social media technologies engender, altering our conceptions of gender and agency. She is completing two other monographs on gendered violence. She is the author of Color of Rape: Gender, Race and Democratic Public Spheres (SUNY Press, 2002) and has co-edited Global Bollywood: The Travels of Hindi Song and Dance (University of Minnesota Press, 2008) and Local Violence, Global Media: Feminist Analyses of Gendered Representations (Peter Lang, 2009). She teaches courses on feminist cultural studies, diasporic media studies, and postcolonial theory.

Prof. Moorti will examine the visual culture that has emerged around the transnational surrogacy industry located in India. Moving beyond the ethical and moral dilemmas posed by the phenomenon this presentation centers on the rich and dense media culture that has emerged around this phenomenon: reproscape. An analysis of these images helps us understand how the different women involved in the surrogacy industry (e.g., surrogates, agents, egg donors, prospective parents and doctors) are each differently located in discourses of citizenship and equally implicated in transnational labor circuits. Informed by critical race theories and postcolonial feminist scholarship the presentation unpacks the racial politics of this industry.

Sponsored by: Sociology and Anthropology, Asian Studies, Gender and Women's Studies, and the Lectures and Concerts General Fund.

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"Revealing Mediterranean Women": Exhibit Opening and Reception

"Revealing Mediterranean Women": Exhibit Opening and Reception

October 30, 20145:00 PM – 6:30 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Join the Mellon Initiative in Mediterranean Studies for refreshments in the Pavilion to celebrate the opening of the Becker Gallery exhibition, "Revealing Mediterranean Women". 

This exhibition explores and critiques European visions of Mediterranean women in art as powerful, monstrous, seductive, or exotic from Ancient Greece through Picasso. 

Organized with the collaboration of students, museum staff, and the faculty from the Mediterranean Studies Humanities Initiative at Bowdoin College.

Photo:  J.P. Sebah, Dame Copte.  n.d. vintage albumen print.  Gift of Isaac Lagnado, Class of 1971.

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An Artist Talk by Sharon Hayes: "The Women's Movement Is a Lesbian Plot!" and Other Anachronisms

An Artist Talk by Sharon Hayes: "The Women's Movement Is a Lesbian Plot!" and Other Anachronisms

October 30, 20147:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Sharon Hayes is an artist who engages multiple mediums–video, performance, and installation–in an ongoing investigation into specific intersections between history, politics and speech. Her work is concerned with developing new representational strategies that examine and interrogate the present political moment as one that reaches simultaneously backward and forward; a present moment that is never wholly its own but rather one that is full of multiple past moments and the speculations of multiple futures. From this ground, Hayes often addresses political events or movements from the 1960s through the 1990s. Her focus on the particular sphere of the near-past is influenced by the potent imbrication of private and public urgencies that she experienced in her own foundational encounters with feminism and AIDS activism.  

Sharon Hayes graduated from Bowdoin College in 1992 and is an Associate Professor at The Cooper Union in New York City. She has had recent solo exhibitions at Andrea Rosen Gallery (New York), Tanya Leighton Gallery (Berlin), the Whitney Museum of American Art (New York) and the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia (Madrid). Her work been shown at the Gwangju Biennale (2014), Venice Biennale (2013), the Museum of Modern Art (New York), the Guggenheim Museum (New York) and numerous museums and venues in Europe and the Americas. Hayes is a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship (2014), the Alpert Award in Visual Arts (2013), an Anonymous Was a Woman Award (2013), Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Fellowship (2007) among other awards.

Made possible with support from the Edit Lansing Koon Sills Lecture Fund of the Society of Bowdoin Women and the Departments of Theater and Dance, Visual Arts, Cinema Studies, Gay and Lesbian Studies, and Gender and Women's Studies Programs, and generous support from the Alice Cooper Morse Fund for the Performing Arts.

Open to the public and free of charge. A reception will follow the Thursday evening presentation.

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'Nowhere to Call Home' : Film Screening with Filmmaker Jocelyn Ford

'Nowhere to Call Home' : Film Screening with Filmmaker Jocelyn Ford

November 18, 20147:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Edwards Arts Center, Room 115 [Digital Media Lab]

Nowhere to Call Home: a Tibetan in Beijing provides a rare glimpse into the world of a widowed Tibetan farmer, torn between her traditional way of life and her desire for her son to have a better future in the city. Shot in the slums of Beijing and a remote village near the epicenter of Tibetan self-immolations, this gripping story of a woman determined to beat the odds puts a human face on the political strife that fractures China and Tibet. 


Beijing-based award-winning radio correspondent and filmmaker Jocelyn Ford hosts this screening, along with the following panel discussion. Ford has been a journalist in Asia for three decades and has a passion for stories on under-represented social issues. For over a decade, she was bureau chief for U.S. public radio's premier national business show, Marketplace, first in Tokyo, later in Beijing. In Japan, as the first foreigner in the prime minister's press corps, she persistently challenged unspoken taboos. In 2001, Ford became the first foreigner to co-produce and co-host China Radio International's first live drive-time news show.

The screening will begin at 7:00pm.

This event is sponsored by the departments of Visual Art, Cinema Studies,  and Gender and Women's Studies. 

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Reception: Book Launch Celebration with Jill Smith and Margaret Boyle

Reception: Book Launch Celebration with Jill Smith and Margaret Boyle

November 19, 20144:30 PM – 6:30 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Join Jill S. Smith, associate professor of German, and Margaret Boyle, assistant professor of Romance Languages, as they celebrate the publication of their books Berlin Coquette: Prostitution and the New German Woman, 1890-1933 and Unruly Women: Performance, Penitence and Punishment in Early Modern Spain.  Light refreshments will be served.

During the late nineteenth century the city of Berlin developed such a reputation for lawlessness and sexual licentiousness that it came to be known as the “Whore of Babylon.” Out of this reputation for debauchery grew an unusually rich discourse around prostitution. In Berlin Coquette: Prostitution and the New German Woman, 1890-1933,  Jill Smith shows how this discourse transcended the usual clichés about prostitutes and actually explored complex visions of alternative moralities or sexual countercultures. She highlights in particular the figure of the cocotte (Kokotte), a specific type of prostitute who capitalized on the illusion of respectable or upstanding womanhood and therefore confounded easy categorization. By exploring the semantic connections between the figure of the cocotte and the act of flirtation (of being coquette), Smith’s work presents flirtation as a type of social interaction through which both prostitutes and non-prostitutes in Imperial and Weimar Berlin could express extramarital sexual desire and agency. Published in the series Signale: Modern German Letters, Cultures, and Thought (Cornell University Press and Cornell University Library). 

Margaret E. Boyle explores the contradictory practices of rehabilitation enacted by women both on and off stage in Unruly Women: Performance, Penitence, and Punishment in Early Modern Spain, the first in-depth study of the interconnected relationships among public theatre, custodial institutions, and women in early modern Spain. Pairing historical narratives and archival records with canonical and non-canonical theatrical representations of women’s deviance and rehabilitation, Unruly Women argues that women’s performances of penitence and punishment should be considered a significant factor in early modern Spanish life. Boyle considers both real-life sites of rehabilitation for women in seventeenth-century Madrid--including a jail and a magdalen house--and women onstage, where she identifies three distinct representations of female deviance: the widow, the vixen, and the murderess. Unruly Women explores these archetypal figures to demonstrate the ways a variety of playwrights comment on women’s non-normative relationships to the topics of marriage, sex, and violence. (University of Toronto Press, 2014)

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'Frozen' : Bowdoin Premieres Disney's Family-Favorite Film

'Frozen' : Bowdoin Premieres Disney's Family-Favorite Film

November 22, 201410:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

"Let it go" all over again with Elsa, Anna, Kristoff, and Olaf! Kids and kids-at-heart are invited for this special Saturday morning sing-along screening of the acclaimed Disney film, Frozen. 

Coffee, juice, and Frosty's famous doughnuts will be served!

Free and open to the public. No tickets required. For more information, contact the Bowdoin Cinema Studies Program at 207-725-3552.

With generous support from the Bowdoin Film Society, Residential Life, and the English Department. 

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'The New Black' : Documentary Screening and Discussion with Yoruba Richen

'The New Black' : Documentary Screening and Discussion with Yoruba Richen

December 8, 20146:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Filmmaker Yoruba Richen returns to Bowdoin for a screening and discussion of her new, award-winning documentary The New Black.

Richen has directed and produced films in the United States, Africa, South America, and Southeast Asia. Her award-winning work, Promised Land, was screened at Bowdoin in Spring 2011, and has since screened at numerous festivals around the world. It received a Diverse Voices Co-Production fund award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and won the Fledgling Fund Award for Social Issue Documentary. 

She has produced for the investigative unit of ABC News and the independent news program Democracy Now. In 2007, she won a Fulbright Award in filmmaking and traveled to Salvador, Brazil, where she began production on Sisters of the Good Death, a documentary about the oldest African women’s association in the Americas and the annual festival they hold celebrating the end of slavery. In 2012, Richen won the Tribeca All Access Creative Promise Award and became a Guggenheim fellow. She is a graduate of Brown University and teaches Documentary Film at CUNY’s Graduate School of Journalism. 

Free and open to the public

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