Location: Bowdoin / Gay and Lesbian Studies / Calendar / Fall 2013

Gay and Lesbian Studies

Fall 2013

Female Embodiment of the Visual World

Female Embodiment of the Visual World

September 28, 2013 8:30 AM  – 4:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Women's Art in Contemporary China

As contemporary Chinese art gains worldwide prominence, where are the women artists? Why are they so often absent from academic discourse and scholarly publication? How do women's art practices figure into critical theory, gender politics, and aesthetics? Why have Chinese women artists refused to have their work identified and defined in terms of feminism, even if they seemingly engage in feminist art practices? In response to these questions, this symposium initiates a platform for considering Chinese women's art. Leading scholars and critics from Asia and the United States will present and discuss issues that concern artists as well as viewers.

This international symposium is presented in conjunction with the Bowdoin College Museum of Art exhibition Breakthrough: Work by Contemporary Chinese Women Artists, from September 27 to December 21, 2013.

For more information and the complete schedule of the events, please visit bowdoin.edu/asian-studies/symposia/female-embodiment-of-the-visual-world-2013/.

SPONSORED BY: the Office of the Dean for Academic Affairs, The Bowdoin College Museum of Art, the Asian Studies Program, and the Art Department.

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Adolescents in the Americas: Negotiating Identities, Shaping Contexts in an Interconnected World

Adolescents in the Americas: Negotiating Identities, Shaping Contexts in an Interconnected World

October 4, 2013 9:30 AM  – 4:00 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Friday, October 4th

9:30 a.m. -11:30 a.m. Friday, "Youth Refiguring Gender and Sexuality: Institutional Contexts, Interpersonal Dynamics"

1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Friday, "Political Engagement and Social Activism among Youth: Opportunities and Possibilities, Present and Future"

This two-day symposium examines the myriad ways in which the activities and voices of youth impact contemporary politics, public culture, and social and interpersonal relationships. Participants include leading scholars in Africana studies, anthropology, education, gay and lesbian studies, gender studies, Latin American and Latino studies, and sociology who conduct research in the United States, Canada and Latin America. For more information and the complete schedule of events, go to: bowdoin.edu/socanthro/symposia/adolescents-in-the-americas-2013/

SPONSORED BY the Office of the Dean for Academic Affairs, the Departments of Education and Sociology and Anthropology, and by the Latin American Studies Program.

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"The Rest of Us: Stories" with Guy Mark Foster

October 30, 2013 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

"The Rest of Us: Stories" Book Release Celebration with Professor Guy Mark Foster

Bowdoin College Associate Professor of English Guy Mark Foster will read from and discuss his newly released collection of short stories, The Rest of Us: Stories (2013).

The Rest of Us has been described as "a remarkable collection of short stories that embrace the breadth and depth of being a gay African-American ... The boys and men in Guy Mark Foster's tales refuse to be bound by the heavy chains of oppressive religion in the family household or racism encountered on campus."

Of Foster's short story collection, Nisi Shawl, co-author of Writing the Other: Bridging Cultural Differences for Successful Fiction says, ''Love makes us all vulnerable. Guy Mark Foster's exquisitely crafted new collection The Rest of Us cradles that vulnerability in crystal-clear yet cryptic language...The Rest of Us rings true notes, dances surely through complicated steps, and offers intimate, detailed vignettes of heroes who surprise readers and themselves with their despair, determination, and hope.''

Copies of The Rest of Us are available for sale at the Bowdoin Bookstore. This event is free and open to the public.

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Queer Matter: Science and Sexuality in the Renaissance

Queer Matter: Science and Sexuality in the Renaissance

November 5, 2013 7:30 PM  – 8:15 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

This inaugural lecture in the "Science Before Science" faculty series and course cluster examines early modern alchemy as a science of generation that had profound implications for defining what it meant to be human and for approaching Nature as an object of study.

Presented by Associate Professor of English Aaron Kitch.

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(Data)Visualizing the Lesbian-Queer History of New York City

(Data)Visualizing the Lesbian-Queer History of New York City

November 20, 2013 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Jen Jack Gieseking (Digital & Computational Studies Initiative)

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and queer (LGBTQ) people have long been denied the ability to define and create their own histories. While much work on LGBTQ people draws upon qualitative work to tell the stories of this oppressed group, the turn in big data and data visualization affords ways of bringing together these people's experiences in new and exciting ways. 

Drawing upon the largest archive of LGBTQ organizing in the US, Prof. Gieseking will show how data visualizations provide more complex renderings of women's histories than previously imagined.

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Staged Reading of the Normal Heart

Staged Reading of the Normal Heart

November 25, 2013 7:00 PM  – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

A staged reading of The Normal Heart, by Larry Kramer, as part of AIDS Awareness Month. The Normal Heart shows the struggle of the gay community in New York City to combat the emergence of the AIDS epidemic. A panel discussion will follow the play, featuring Whitney Hogan (Peer Health) and Peter Coviello (Gay & Lesbian Studies). Directed by Jamie Weisbach, '16." Presented through special arrangement with Samuel French Inc.

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"Their Eyes Were Watching God"

December 5, 2013 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Revisiting Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God

Bowdoin Book Lecture by Guy Mark Foster, associate professor of English

About the novel:
First published at the closing years of the Harlem Renaissance, in 1937, Their Eyes Were Watching God has since become a landmark text within the African American women's literary tradition. The novel's black female protagonist, Janie Crawford, experiences more than her share of joy and tragedy as she embarks on a series of intimate relationships with three different men, each of whom has a significant role to play in this character's colorful and tumultuous journey to self-knowledge. Along the way, Janie learns a great deal about the world of men and women during an era of racial inequality, as well as her own capacity to love and endure. Many early critics considered Their Eyes to be somewhat anomalous, as most black writers during this period chose to center the narrative of racial conflict between the races in their writings. Hurston's novel is an exception.

About the speaker:
Guy Mark Foster teaches courses in African American literature as well as Gay and Lesbian Studies at Bowdoin College. He has published critical essays on such diverse topics as interracial intimacy, black female identity, the contemporary romance novel, and LGBTQ representation in popular culture. He is presently revising a book-length manuscript entitled, "Waking up to the Enemy: Towards a New Ethics of Interracial Intimacy in African American Literature." Also a fiction writer, Professor Foster's short story collection, The Rest of Us, was recently published by Lethe Press.

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