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Updated: 35 min 32 sec ago

John Fish ’82 on Dyslexia and His Boston Construction Empire (Boston Globe)

Fri, 07/18/2014 - 13:30
John Fish '82

John Fish ’82

For the first part of his life, John Fish ’82 was “the little boy who couldn’t,” held back by others’ (and increasingly, his own) misinterpretation of his dyslexia as a lack of intelligence. When he was diagnosed, it set him free — throughout the rest of his educational journey, he was diligent and determined to succeed, even though he knew it would take more time and hard work for him than for everyone else. Since then, he has been at the forefront of Suffolk Construction Company, serving as chief executive — the fourth generation in his family to work in the construction industry.

Suffolk is Boston’s biggest construction firm, bringing in more than $2 billion in revenue annually. Since the company began, Fish’s business style has changed from the fight and fire that got him through school (and caused heated disputes in the construction world) to one based on lasting partnerships that have taken him through many projects — and on to a bid for Boston as the host of the 2024 Olympics. Read more from The Boston Globe.

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An Interactive Model of Historical Supreme Court Decisions (Mashable)

Fri, 07/18/2014 - 13:29

United States Supreme Court buildingYou are probably familiar with some of the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent rulings over the past few years — upholding the Affordable Care Act and striking down the Defense Of Marriage Act, for example. Many of the most controversial Supreme Court cases are addressed during the last two weeks of June, which represent the end of the session. With this interactive model from Mashable, you can see what the court has decided on a variety of historical hot-button issues over the past 68 years.

Here’s how to explore the model: Cases are organized in layers, each representing a different type of issue, from criminal procedure to federal taxation. Mouse over a layer to see (in the upper right-hand corner) the number of the case and the total number of cases. Scrolling from left to right allows you to advance towards more recent cases (the year is displayed in the upper left-hand corner). Click once to see the name and overview of a case — scroll to the top left of the blurb to exit out and return to the graph.

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With Summer Grant, John Branch ’16 Helps Find Poverty Solutions

Fri, 07/18/2014 - 13:27

johnbranch-256x340In his second summer interning with Innovations for Poverty Action, John Branch ’16 is researching many unique ways in which impoverished people are improving their lives and their communities.

Innovations for Poverty Action, founded in 2002 by a Yale economist in New Haven, Conn., has an international network of more than 200 experts (primarily academics) and 500 staff who are researching solutions to reduce global poverty. The organization uses its findings to advocate for policies that have been proven effective. Read the full story.

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Infographic: How to Make Rest Work — For Work (Visual.ly)

Fri, 07/18/2014 - 13:27
Click image to view full-size

Click image to view full-size

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Bowdoin Team Heads to Brazil for Robot Soccer World Cup

Thu, 07/17/2014 - 13:24

Soccerball with flags in net

Now that the FIFA World Cup contenders have finished battling it out, another international soccer competition is just getting started in Brazil — only this time, the players aren’t human.

Five Bowdoin students are on their way to Logan Airport this morning for a flight to João Pessoa, Brazil, for RoboCup 2014 — an annual competition between teams of autonomous, knee-high robots whose soccer-playing prowess reflects the skill and hard work of their programmers.

“Everything the robots do on the field is the result of a program written by students,” said Professor of Computer Science Eric Chown, coach and faculty advisor to the team, noting that the technology has made remarkable advances in the past decade. “We make progress every year, and over the years that’s a lot of progress.”

Read more about the exploits of Bowdoin’s robotic soccer team.

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Druckenmiller ’75 on Investors Who Still Have ‘Guts’ (CNBC)

Thu, 07/17/2014 - 13:22

Investor Stanley Druckenmiller ’75 talks about two of the investors he says still have the “guts” to make the big market calls in this clip from CNBC.

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Read Like Bill Gates (Farnham Street)

Thu, 07/17/2014 - 13:21

booksIn addition to his numerous other contributions, Bill Gates offers an annual summer reading list to the world. This year’s six picks are all books that Gates read earlier this year. The topics include business, science, history — and even a novel. John Brooks’ Business Adventures also comes recommended by Warren Buffett (who recommended it to Gates himself).

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Infographic: How Long to Nap (Visual.ly)

Thu, 07/17/2014 - 13:20
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Click image to view full-size

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Coastal Studies Symposium Previews Summer Research, Marine Lab Expansion

Wed, 07/16/2014 - 13:14

 Abby McBride)Summer may be a break from classes, but right now things are busier than ever at Bowdoin’s Coastal Studies Center: students and faculty have launched into scientific research projects investigating green crabs, blue mussels, lobsters, sea stars, eelgrass, fish, clams, and more. This week they converged to share their research with each other and with visiting audience members during the Coastal Studies Summer 2014 Research Symposium.

Fifteen students and seven faculty members from several departments and programs presented their research, ranging from studies that use marine organisms as models for understanding fundamental biological processes – locomotion in sea stars, for instance, or cardiac neural control in lobsters – to investigations of how coastal organisms and ecosystems are responding to environmental shifts such as rising ocean temperature and acidity.

In his introductory remarks, Coastal Studies Center director and Associate Professor of Biology David Carlon described not only the ecological changes that are taking place in the Gulf of Maine but also the changes in store for the Center and its on-site Marine Lab. Read more about it.

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Arctic Museum Wins Two First-Place Awards

Wed, 07/16/2014 - 13:14

The Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum has taken home two first-place awards in the New England Museum Association’s 2014 Publication Award Competition.

 Your Favorite Things" event.

Award-winning invitation for Arctic Museum’s “Pop-Up Museum: Your Favorite Things” event.

The Museum’s invitation to its “Pop-Up Museum: Your Favorite Things” event won first place in the Invitations category and the Museum’s brochure “Spirits of Land, Air, and Water” won first place in the Exhibit Supplementary Materials category. Fifty-seven museums submitted 168 publications to this year’s competition.

“We are gratified by the recognition of the thought, care, and humor that went into developing both pieces,” said Susan Kaplan, director of the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum, “and we are thrilled that our colleagues in the museum world chose to recognize our work.”

Both publications were developed by Arctic Museum staff in consultation with Bill Fall of Fall Design. The brochure features Inuit art from the Robert and Judith Toll Collection, photographed by Dean Abraham. Penmor Lithographers printed both pieces.

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Our Friends Share Our Genes (Time)

Wed, 07/16/2014 - 13:12

DNA flipDNAGood friends are often genetically similar, sharing as much as one percent of the same gene variants, according to a new study by researchers from Yale University and University of California at San Diego.

“In genetic terms, that’s a lot,” says Time, “as close as, say, fourth cousins.” More than this, the genes friends share also evolve more quickly than others, opening up the question of whether friendship plays a role in evolution.

The scientists looked at 1.5 million gene variants from a dataset that contains details on the participants’ friendships and genetics.

 

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Infographic: How to Nap Effectively (Visual.ly)

Wed, 07/16/2014 - 13:11

Continuing our series on productivity, we delve into best practices for napping, because a well rested person is a productive person.

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Click image to view full-size

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Bowdoin’s Whitney Soule: ‘Low-Income Students’ Success in College Starts in High School’ (Diverse)

Tue, 07/15/2014 - 12:44
Whitney Soule

Whitney Soule

In an op-ed piece for Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, Whitney Soule, Bowdoin’s director of admissions, writes of the necessity of diversity on college campuses amid the challenges involved in recruiting low-income and first-generation students.

Soule, with co-author Jessica Pliska, founder and CEO of The Opportunity Network, says getting inside the mind of just such a high school student requires partnerships between colleges and organizations where students live. Read “Low-Income Students’ Success in College Starts in High School.” 

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A French Lesson in Honor of Bastille Day (Los Angeles Times)

Tue, 07/15/2014 - 12:44

Communication concept - Speech cloudEven if you didn’t celebrate Bastille Day, you can still celebrate the simplicity of speaking a language (English) that includes only one form of “you.” In other languages, such as Spanish and French, there are both formal and informal ways of addressing someone in second person (usted/ustedes vs. and vous vs. tu, respectively) and knowing which one to use can be tricky. This witty flowchart from The Los Angeles Times helps you brush up on this distinction in French in any situation, whether you are an adult conversing with a younger member of a royal family, your coworkers, your father in law, and even God.

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Would You Name Your Daughter or Son After a Movie Character? (Huffington Post)

Tue, 07/15/2014 - 12:43

BabyMany parents are looking to to popular culture — especially films — for inspiration in naming their children. The Huffington Post reveals the mid-year top picks for baby names in 2014, and some might seem familiar: Katniss (#14 for girls and lead character of The Hunger Games book and movie trilogy), and Django (#46 for boys and lead character in Quentin Tarrantino’s Django Unchained), among others.

 

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Infographic: Boost Your Productivity (Visual.ly)

Tue, 07/15/2014 - 12:43
Click image to view full-size

Click image to view full-size

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Museum of Art Tuttle Exhibition ‘Most Exciting and Important Exhibition of Contemporary Art’ (Portland Press Herald)

Mon, 07/14/2014 - 12:02

 

"Trans Asian," 1993. Color woodcut printed on silk with Chinese Xuan Zhi paper.

“Trans Asian,” 1993. Color woodcut printed on silk with Chinese Xuan Zhi paper.

 

Calling the Bowdoin College Museum of Art exhibition Richard Tuttle: A Print Retrospectivethe most exciting and important exhibition of contemporary art to have been mounted in Maine in many years,” Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram art reviewer Dan Kany extols the virtues of the show, saying “A Print Retrospective is not only an exciting show, but it will make you a better viewer of contemporary art.” Read the review.

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Interning at NYC Arts Orgs with Bowdoin Grants

Mon, 07/14/2014 - 12:01
Raisa Tolchinsky ’15

Raisa Tolchinsky ’15

Sarah Haimes ’15 is spending many of her summer mornings traveling around New York City’s five boroughs to check on public art installations. Raisa Tolchinsky ’17 is working in a Brooklyn office, reading unsolicited manuscripts and and corresponding with writers. These two are among a handful of students who are taking advantage of summertime grants from Bowdoin to explore arts and literature jobs around the world — or in New York City. Read more about their work.

 

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Why Giving With No Strings Makes Good Business Sense (Inc.)

Mon, 07/14/2014 - 12:00

 

Giver, taker or matcher? Most of us are said to be matchers, along the lines of “you bought last time, so I’ve got this one.” Wharton School of Business professor Adam Grant says such transactional behavior of maintaining a balance of giving and taking is a mistake in business. He says givers, by extending their contributions more widely, cultivate a broader and more diverse network. Read more.

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Infographic: A Productive Day (Visual.ly)

Mon, 07/14/2014 - 11:58

Lazy days of summer? Maybe for some. Whether things slow down, giving you a chance to assess and regroup, or still have you “out straight,” as some Mainers say, we’re taking the next two weeks to pass along tips to help your productivity.

Click image to view full-size

Click image to view full-size

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