Parents and Families

Bowdoin’s Whitney Soule: ‘Low-Income Students’ Success in College Starts in High School’ (Diverse)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 12:44
Whitney Soule

Whitney Soule

In an op-ed piece for Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, Whitney Soule, Bowdoin’s director of admissions, writes of the necessity of diversity on college campuses amid the challenges involved in recruiting low-income and first-generation students.

Soule, with co-author Jessica Pliska, founder and CEO of The Opportunity Network, says getting inside the mind of just such a high school student requires partnerships between colleges and organizations where students live. Read “Low-Income Students’ Success in College Starts in High School.” 

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A French Lesson in Honor of Bastille Day (Los Angeles Times)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 12:44

Communication concept - Speech cloudEven if you didn’t celebrate Bastille Day, you can still celebrate the simplicity of speaking a language (English) that includes only one form of “you.” In other languages, such as Spanish and French, there are both formal and informal ways of addressing someone in second person (usted/ustedes vs. and vous vs. tu, respectively) and knowing which one to use can be tricky. This witty flowchart from The Los Angeles Times helps you brush up on this distinction in French in any situation, whether you are an adult conversing with a younger member of a royal family, your coworkers, your father in law, and even God.

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Would You Name Your Daughter or Son After a Movie Character? (Huffington Post)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 12:43

BabyMany parents are looking to to popular culture — especially films — for inspiration in naming their children. The Huffington Post reveals the mid-year top picks for baby names in 2014, and some might seem familiar: Katniss (#14 for girls and lead character of The Hunger Games book and movie trilogy), and Django (#46 for boys and lead character in Quentin Tarrantino’s Django Unchained), among others.

 

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Infographic: Boost Your Productivity (Visual.ly)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 12:43
Click image to view full-size

Click image to view full-size

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Museum of Art Tuttle Exhibition ‘Most Exciting and Important Exhibition of Contemporary Art’ (Portland Press Herald)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 12:02

 

"Trans Asian," 1993. Color woodcut printed on silk with Chinese Xuan Zhi paper.

“Trans Asian,” 1993. Color woodcut printed on silk with Chinese Xuan Zhi paper.

 

Calling the Bowdoin College Museum of Art exhibition Richard Tuttle: A Print Retrospectivethe most exciting and important exhibition of contemporary art to have been mounted in Maine in many years,” Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram art reviewer Dan Kany extols the virtues of the show, saying “A Print Retrospective is not only an exciting show, but it will make you a better viewer of contemporary art.” Read the review.

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Interning at NYC Arts Orgs with Bowdoin Grants

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 12:01
Raisa Tolchinsky ’15

Raisa Tolchinsky ’15

Sarah Haimes ’15 is spending many of her summer mornings traveling around New York City’s five boroughs to check on public art installations. Raisa Tolchinsky ’17 is working in a Brooklyn office, reading unsolicited manuscripts and and corresponding with writers. These two are among a handful of students who are taking advantage of summertime grants from Bowdoin to explore arts and literature jobs around the world — or in New York City. Read more about their work.

 

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Why Giving With No Strings Makes Good Business Sense (Inc.)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 12:00

 

Giver, taker or matcher? Most of us are said to be matchers, along the lines of “you bought last time, so I’ve got this one.” Wharton School of Business professor Adam Grant says such transactional behavior of maintaining a balance of giving and taking is a mistake in business. He says givers, by extending their contributions more widely, cultivate a broader and more diverse network. Read more.

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Infographic: A Productive Day (Visual.ly)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 11:58

Lazy days of summer? Maybe for some. Whether things slow down, giving you a chance to assess and regroup, or still have you “out straight,” as some Mainers say, we’re taking the next two weeks to pass along tips to help your productivity.

Click image to view full-size

Click image to view full-size

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Bowdoin Blogger’s Summer Goal: Visit Every Town in Rhode Island

Bowdoin Campus News - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 15:20
This summer, blogger Michael Colbert ’16 is on a mission to travel to every town in his home state of Rhode Island.
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Museum of Art’s Frank Goodyear on the Jazz Photography of William P. Gottlieb

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 13:01
Frank Goodyear

Frank Goodyear

 

The Bowdoin College Museum of Art has opened an exhibition of vintage photographs by William P. Gottlieb capturing jazz musicians in performance. Museum of Art Co-Director Frank Goodyear puts in context the exhibition On 52nd Street: The Jazz Photography of William P. Gottlieb, on view through September 14, 2014.

The Bowdoin College Museum of Art is pleased to present On 52nd Street: The Jazz Photography of William P. Gottlieb. To be on view from July 10 to September 14, 2014, the exhibition features 42 vintage photographs of jazz musicians in performance from the collection of the photographer’s family.

Gottlieb created these images during the 1940s, a period when New York’s 52nd Street was the epicenter of a music revolution with broad social reverberations. Known as “Swing Alley,” or simply “The Street,” it was “heaven on earth for jazz fans and jazz musicians,” Gottlieb recalled.

In the dozen or so nightclubs located there — mostly in the converted basements of former speakeasies — jazz emerged as a distinct concert music with featured soloists. No longer simply dance music, jazz as exemplified by the burgeoning bebop tradition became to Gottlieb a “rebellion against the rigidities of the old order.” “The Street” was also one of the few racially integrated places in the city. As trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie remembered, there was “very little racist feeling,” though “once you left 52nd Street, look out.”

Louis “Satchmo” Armstrong 1901-1971 Born New Orleans, Louisiana Gelatin silver print, 1947 © 2014 Louis Armstrong House MuseumLouis “Satchmo” Armstrong 1901-1971 Born New Orleans, Louisiana Gelatin silver print, 1947 © 2014 Louis Armstrong House Museum

Louis “Satchmo” Armstrong 1901-1971 Born New Orleans, Louisiana Gelatin silver print, 1947 © 2014 Louis Armstrong House Museum

Billie Holiday 1915-1959 Born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Gelatin silver print, 1947Billie Holiday 1915-1959 Born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Gelatin silver print, 1947

Billie Holiday 1915-1959 Born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Gelatin silver print, 1947

Sidney Bechet, 1897–1959 Born New Orleans, Louisiana gelatin silver print, 1947Sidney Bechet, 1897–1959 Born New Orleans, Louisiana gelatin silver print, 1947

Sidney Bechet, 1897–1959 Born New Orleans, Louisiana gelatin silver print, 1947

Cab Calloway 1907-1994 Born Rochester, New York Gelatin silver print, 1947Cab Calloway 1907-1994 Born Rochester, New York Gelatin silver print, 1947

Cab Calloway 1907-1994 Born Rochester, New York Gelatin silver print, 1947

Billie Holiday 1915-1959 Born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Gelatin silver print, 1946Billie Holiday 1915-1959 Born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Gelatin silver print, 1946

Billie Holiday 1915-1959 Born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Gelatin silver print, 1946

John “Dizzy” Gillespie 1918-1993 Born Cheraw, South Carolina Gelatin silver print, 1947John “Dizzy” Gillespie 1918-1993 Born Cheraw, South Carolina Gelatin silver print, 1947

John “Dizzy” Gillespie 1918-1993 Born Cheraw, South Carolina Gelatin silver print, 1947

Born in Brooklyn, Gottlieb began photographing jazz musicians in 1938 to illustrate a weekly feature, “Swing Sessions,” that he wrote for The Washington Post.  Over the next decade he created almost 2,000 portraits of more than 250 musicians.

In The NewsRead about the Museum of Art’s Gottlieb exhibition in ArtDaily.

At this time he also had a regular jazz program at WRC Radio and served as an assistant editor for Down Beat magazine. Gottlieb’s black and white photographs are notable for their artistic originality and the intimate relationship he formed with many of his subjects.

In 1948, he retired from the jazz world in order to found a company that produced educational filmstrips. Gottlieb’s jazz photographs took on a new life after the publication in 1979 of his book The Golden Age of Jazz.

Further recognition came in 1995 when the Library of Congress purchased more than 1,600 of his negatives. While displays of modern prints from these negatives have been organized in the past, this exhibition at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art presents for the first time a large collection of vintage prints from the 1940s that Gottlieb and his family retained.

These images bring forward the leading jazz musicians of this era and tell the remarkable story of 52nd Street. A musical soundtrack accompanies the exhibition.

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Christine Parsons ’15′s Summer Job: Helping to Cure Cancer

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 12:59

christineparsonsFor the second summer in a row, Christine Parsons ’15 is working at Yale University’s Slack Lab, which studies the intricately linked processes of aging, cancer and development in the model organism C. elegans. In particular, the lab’s researchers are trying to better understand microRNAs, which are tiny regulatory molecules that control gene expression and are implicated in many diseases.

Parsons has a summertime grant from Bowdoin’s Career Planning office to fund her internship. Her grant, from the Bowdoin College Alumni Council, is one of several fellowships awarded to students who want to pursue interesting internships or projects around the world. Read the full story.

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On Happiness, Optimism, and Setting Goals (TED)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 12:59

Smiley FaceSean Achor is a happiness expert. No, really. As CEO of Good Think and author of Before Happiness and The Happiness Advantage, he has devoted his life to researching positive psychology and its effective application. In a recent TED talk, Achor discussed how, contrary to the belief that success brings happiness, the brain works the other way around — meaning that being happy can make you more successful. So what are the mental obstacles that keep people “stuck in their ways”? From being irrationally optimistic to setting goals that are too far off in the future, this Q&A with Achor may bring you one step closer to happiness.

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For Profit For Good: Environmental Studies Students Explore Business World

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 13:04
forprofitforgood

Emil Gaal ’15 and Bridgett McCoy ’15

Big business is often blamed for environmental degradation, but two students are turning to the for-profit world to fulfill their ambitions to help the environment. This summer Emi Gaal ’15 is working for an international energy corporation — one that is building renewable energy plants. And Bridgett McCoy ’15 is working for a large commercial bank, but one founded on the mission to use “finance to deliver sustainable development for unserved people, communities and the environment.” Read the full story.

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How To Think About Your Thoughts (Scientific American)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 13:02

TheThinker128What if metacognition — that is, the way we think about thinking — was just as important as the thinking itself? New research shows a connection between the beliefs people hold about their thoughts and anxiety disorders. For example, children with anxiety disorders were more likely to report both positive (“worrying helps me feel better”) and negative (“worrying might make me go crazy”) beliefs about worry than children without anxiety disorders. Scientists are now exploring the possibilities for metacognitive therapy in alleviating symptoms of psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia.

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Where Temporary Exhibitions Go to Rest (Smithsonian)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 13:01

Museum240Most of us have seen, at one time or another, a museum exhibition that blew us away. So why do museums change or take away some of their most beloved exhibitions? Other than the astoundingly large collections that some of these museums can boast, factors such as light sensitivity necessitate that objects be rotated in and out of the metaphorical spotlight. National Museum of American History intern Elisabeth Warsinske tells all.

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On Sorting Out Your Early-Life Crisis (Time)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 13:00

science-lab

If you find yourself starring in your own version of “The Young and the Directionless,” this one is for you. It may seem as though those around you have it all figured out, and that you’re the only one who hasn’t identified your passion and the ideal career path, but you are certainly not alone. Time magazine may be of some help, suggesting you can stop confusing what-you’ll-get-paid-for with what-you’re-into.” 

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Maggie Bryan ’15 Explores the Cultural Crossover Behind French Impressionism

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Wed, 07/09/2014 - 13:55
DSC_0385

Maggie Bryan ’15

You may be familiar with Japanese-French fusion in culinary terms, but who knew that those two countries are also connected in art history?

During the early 19th century, Japanese artworks such as fans, silks, kimonos and prints began trickling into France, where they inspired significant changes in French art – a topic on which Maggie Bryan ’15 is becoming something of an expert.

This summer, under the guidance of Assistant Professor of Art History Peggy Wang, Bryan is researching how impressionist and post-impressionist French painters were influenced by the woodblock prints of Utagawa Hiroshige, Katsushika Hokusai and other Japanese artists.

Read more about Bryan’s research on the Japanese influence behind French impressionism.

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The ‘Cognitive Price’ We Pay While Multitasking (Harvard Business Review)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Wed, 07/09/2014 - 13:32

Stressed business man  with two telephones is cryoing in officeIt’s easier to switch from task to task when everything is contained within a screen. Think about it: you wouldn’t drop everything and head to the grocery store each time you wanted or were out of a food item, would you? Unfortunately, switching back and forth between tasks to continuously stay connected through texts, emails, and more has a similar (although less visible) detriment to productivity. It can take as much as 20 minutes to reorient yourself to a focused task after a distraction, and allowing yourself to be casually distracted can knock you down as much as 10 IQ points. Giving yourself as little as 30 minutes of distraction-free time can make a huge impact on how much you accomplish.

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Gluten Free: Good or Goofy? (Washington Post)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Wed, 07/09/2014 - 13:30

Farmer holding grainIn case you haven’t heard, there’s a new health trend in town: people are avoiding gluten, a protein combination found in various grains, notably wheat. About 1% of Americans suffer from celiac disease, in which gluten causes problems in the small intestine, but others — about 10 times as many others — also maintain a gluten-free diet, claimimg numerous health benefits such as heightened energy levels.

On one hand, companies and gluten-free dieters alike are profiting from a myriad of increasingly delicious and varied gluten-free products. On the other hand, the gluten-free trend might lead people to take actual gluten intolerances and allergies less seriously. Read more from The Washington Post.

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Interning at NYC Arts Orgs with Bowdoin Grants

Bowdoin Campus News - Tue, 07/08/2014 - 17:58
This summer, a handful of Bowdoin graduates are using grants from Bowdoin Career Planning's funded internship program to explore possible careers in art and literature.
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