Parents and Families

Three Students Tackle Public Health In Maine, Cambodia, and Kenya

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Mon, 08/25/2014 - 13:10

Aviva Mattingly ’15 in Kenya

Each summer, a plethora of grants and fellowships ensures that Bowdoin students have an opportunity to pursue what they are passionate about. Ben Pallant ’16, Aviva Mattingly ’15 and Jordan Lantz ’15 tapped three of these grants to dedicate their summers to addressing public health issues in Cambodia, Kenya and Maine, respectively.

Lantz remained in Brunswick on a Community Matters in Maine Fellowship, assisting at the Oasis Health Center, a free medical clinic. After college, he aims to pursue a master’s degree in public health. Mattingly traveled to several locations in Kenya with the support of the Preston Public Interest Career Fund, working with SOTENI, an NGO. In the future, Mattingly hopes to work in international public health as a surgeon. Pallant interned at Angkor Children’s Hospital in Cambodia, supported by the Strong/Gault Social Advancement Internship fund. His experience solidified his desire to pursue a medical degree and work in patient care. Read a Q&A with the three students by Catherine Yochum ’15.

 

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What One Man Found When He Liked Everything on Facebook (Wired)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Mon, 08/25/2014 - 13:09

facebook-logo256After liking everything that came up in his newsfeed for 48 straight hours, Mat Honan found, surprisingly, a whole lot of content that he disliked. There is a specific type of Facebook content “designed to get you to interact,” he explains. “And if you take the bait, you’ll be shown it ad nauseam.” When viewed on his computer, he still saw some posts from his friends — but on his mobile, human content disappeared entirely, replaced on the first day with content from “Huffington Post, Upworthy, Huffington Post, Upworthy, a Levi’s ad, Space.com, Huffington Post, Upworthy, The Verge, Huffington Post, Space.com, Upworthy, Space.com.” And this was just the beginning of the repercussions. Honan’s experiment lasted only 48 hours because he couldn’t stand it anymore.

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‘Just Keep Smiling’ Not Always Good Advice (Huffington Post)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Mon, 08/25/2014 - 13:08

Smiley Face“Fake it till you feel it” is one way of coping with a lack of confidence or masking negative emotions: just smile and keep your head held high, and eventually you’ll feel better. Right? As it turns out, this strategy may backfire, causing people who “fake it” to associate smiling with both happiness and unhappiness. If you are someone who smiles when you’re happy, then smiling is likely to make you feel better. If not, don’t force it.

 

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Former All-American Kristin Hanczor Named Assistant Coach for Women's Volleyball

Bowdoin Athletics - Top Stories - Mon, 08/25/2014 - 04:00
BRUNSWICK, Maine - Former Bowdoin All-American Kristin Hanczor has been named as assistant coach for the Polar Bear women's volleyball team.
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What I Did This Summer: Government Professor Laura Henry

Bowdoin Academic Spotlight - Fri, 08/22/2014 - 13:57
Laura Henry, associate professor of government at Bowdoin, tells us about her summer researching international politics in Russia.
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What I Did This Summer: Government Professor Laura Henry

Bowdoin Campus News - Fri, 08/22/2014 - 13:57
Laura Henry, associate professor of government at Bowdoin, tells us about her summer researching international politics in Russia.
Categories: Bowdoin

Bowdoin Students Train for Marine Corps

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Fri, 08/22/2014 - 13:06
Mac Caputi ’15

Mac Caputi ’15

For six weeks this summer, three Bowdoin students got by on little sleep, endured pointed criticism and suffered many physical hardships. They were working through the challenges of Officer Candidates School in Quantico, Va., in their quest to become second lieutenants in the U.S. Marine Corps.

Mac Caputi ’15, Dimitria Spathakis ’16 and Brendan Lawler ’16 are enrolled in the Marine Corps’ competitive two-year summer program for college students. Read the full story.

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Where the US Falls Behind on Women in the Workforce (New York Times)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Fri, 08/22/2014 - 13:04

FamilyIt’s true that during the last three decades of the 1900s, many changes bolstered women’s ability to join the American workforce. Yet in recent years, other countries have made progress that we have not — and the percentage of women working is actually declining slightly after years of increase.

These other countries have implemented various policies to aid working parents, such as paid family leave and subsidized child care that the U.S. is still lacking. In fact, the United States is the only developed country in the world not to offer paid maternity leave as part of federal policy — as a result only 59% of employees report having this benefit. Read more about the impact of paid leave on employees from The New York Times.

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Standard Calamari Units: A New Way to Measure Food Trends

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Fri, 08/22/2014 - 13:02

hummus chickpeasWhen was the first time you ate fried calamari? Was it in a highbrow New York restaurant or at your local Applebee’s? It’s easy to determine from your answer whether that first time was recent or closer to 30 years ago. Food trends, just like fashion trends, trickle down from fancy venues to hip neighborhood spots to national chains.

The New York Times has created a scale, based on the ascent and descent of their coverage of fried calamari, to measure the timetable for other trendy foods such as hummus, goat cheese, and tuna tartare in Standard Calamari Units. So what determines whether these trends stick around once they hit the mainstream? The answer lies simply in how good they taste.

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The History of Autocorrect, Complete with Illustrations (Wired)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Fri, 08/22/2014 - 13:00

autocorrect128Despite entire sites that showcase the hilarity of autocorrect hiccups, the tech service really deserves a lot of credit. How often have you typed teh only to have your error fixed, maybe without you even noticing? Autocorrect blossomed from the efforts of Dean Hachamovitch, a Microsoft VP and data scientist, who first started correcting the above mistake with the F3 and left arrow keys — and then realized you could incorporate this coding directly into the space bar command that you would be hitting anyway.

Autocorrect progressed from there at the hands of an intern, who compiled autocorrect dictionaries from Microsoft employees, and on to correct caps lock errors, homophone phrases, and more. Read more about the innovations and glitches along the way — such as a period during which cooperation was often (and ironically) changed to Cupertino, the location of Apple’s headquarters in California.

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Bowdoin Quad Gets a New Memorial Flagpole (and Flag)

Bowdoin Campus News - Thu, 08/21/2014 - 10:54
For 84 years, a tall, straight pole made of Douglas fir supported the flag that flew above the southwest corner of the Bowdoin Quad. Of course, wood doesn't last forever and this summer, the College replaced the original Memorial Flagpole with a 72-foot fiberglass pole that will be easier to maintain and should last quite a bit longer.
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Nicky Pearson Selected to NFHCA Hall of Fame

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Thu, 08/21/2014 - 10:51
Nicky256

Head coach Nicky Pearson has led Bowdoin to four NCAA Division III Championships.

 

 

Bowdoin College head field hockey coach Nicky Pearson has been selected to the National Field Hockey Coaches Association Hall of Fame.

In 18 seasons at the helm of the Polar Bears, she has established Bowdoin as the premiere team in Division III field hockey, qualifying for the postseason every year and making NCAA Division III Final Four appearances in 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011 and 2013. Read more.

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Anthony Doerr ’95′s ‘All the Light We Cannot See’ Among Week’s Bestselling Books (Christian Science Monitor)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Thu, 08/21/2014 - 10:51

Doerr cover

 

All the Light We Cannot See, the World War II-era novel about a blind French girl and a German boy whose paths collide in occupied France, by Anthony Doerr ’95, is on the American Booksellers Association/IndieBound bestseller list for hardcover fiction for the week of August 21, 2014.

In her review of the book this spring, New York Times reviewer Janet Maslin included a note of thanks to the author “for deliberately giving this intricate book an extremely readable format, with very short chapters, many about a page and a half long.”

Maslin included what would be a response from Doerr, though in an article published earlier by a blog: “This was a gesture of friendliness, maybe. It’s like I’m saying to the reader, ‘I know this is going to be more lyrical than maybe 70 percent of American readers want to see, but here’s a bunch of white space for you to recover from that lyricism.’” Read the New York Times review.

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Stalking the Invasive Green Crab in Harpswell Sound

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Thu, 08/21/2014 - 10:50

Aidan Short ’15 is unusually familiar with the invasive green crabs in Harpswell Sound: specifically, with the contents of their stomachs.


Stalking the Invasive Green Crab from Bowdoin College on Vimeo.

The green crab has a reputation for devouring soft-shell clams, the species behind one of Maine’s most lucrative fisheries. But how much of the crab’s diet is really made up of clams? What other creatures are falling prey to this clawed invader? And how does all of that vary by habitat? These are some questions that Short is exploring through his research project “What’s for Dinner? A molecular analysis of the feeding habits of the green crab Carcinus maenas in Harpswell Sound.”

Short has been working on the water and in the lab, using a combination of crab trapping, dissection, and molecular techniques to figure out just what these crabs are swallowing - not a task for the faint of stomach. Funded this summer by a Doherty Coastal Studies Research Fellowship, Short will continue his research as part of a year-long honors project in collaboration with biology assistant professor David Carlon, who directs Bowdoin’s Coastal Studies Center.

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Portland Among ‘Greatest Places to Live in America’ (Outside)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Thu, 08/21/2014 - 10:50
portland

Portland, Maine

News that will come as no surprise to many who have visited Maine’s largest city: Portland is among “The 16 Greatest Places to Live in America,” according to calculations by Outside magazine. Citing the proliferation of bike commuters and locally sourced restaurants, Outside gives you the inside scoop on what makes Portland — and the other fifteen locales — so special.

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Rudalevige on Obama’s ‘Un-vacation Vacation’ in NY Daily News

Bowdoin Campus News - Wed, 08/20/2014 - 13:54
Andrew Rudalevige is everywhere these days. Bowdoin's Thomas Brackett Reed Professor of Government has been tapped for insight and quoted in The Washington Post, The New York Times, and most recently, The New York Daily News.
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Bowdoin Quad Gets a New Memorial Flagpole (and Flag)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Wed, 08/20/2014 - 13:45

For 84 years, a tall, straight pole made of Douglas fir supported the flag that flew above the southwest corner of the Bowdoin Quad. Of course, wood doesn’t last forever and this summer, the College replaced the original Memorial Flagpole with a 72-foot fiberglass pole that will be easier to maintain and should last quite a bit longer. The new pole also supports a larger flag — according to the experts the previous flag-to-flagpole ratio was a bit off.

Consigli Construction, which specializes in historic renovations, took down the old pole piece by piece in July. The company had to resort to using a high-pressured water hose to extract the base of the lodged pole, which ran all the way to the bottom of the granite monument. On August 19, the company erected the new pole, reattached the gilded eagle, and raised the new flag.

History buffs will know that Bowdoin’s Memorial Flagpole was designed by famed architects McKim, Mead & White, the same firm that also designed the Walker Art Building, the Class of 1875 gate, Moulton Union, and the Curtis Pool. Less well-known is that the flagpole was supposed to be situated out in the middle of the Quad. A group of students didn’t like that idea, so one Saturday night in the spring of 1930, before the new pole could be erected, they decided to move the pole into the Bowdoin Chapel. President Sills was not amused, but in the end a compromise was struck and Bowdoin’s Memorial Flagpole found a permanent home between Gibson Hall and the Walker Art Building. Read more about the history of the Memorial Flagpole in this account by Patricia McGraw Anderson.

“X” marks the planned original site for the Memorial Flagpole“X” marks the planned original site for the Memorial Flagpole

“X” marks the planned original site for the Memorial Flagpole

Students remove flagpole to the ChapelStudents remove flagpole to the Chapel

Students remove flagpole to the Chapel

A not-so-amused President SillsA not-so-amused President Sills

A not-so-amused President Sills

Removing the poleRemoving the pole

Removing the pole

Gilded eagle atop the Memorial FlagpoleGilded eagle atop the Memorial Flagpole

Gilded eagle atop the Memorial Flagpole

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Rudalevige on Obama’s ‘Un-vacation Vacation’ (NY Daily News)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Wed, 08/20/2014 - 13:04
Andrew Rudalevige

Andrew Rudalevige

Andrew Rudalevige is everywhere these days. Bowdoin’s Thomas Brackett Reed Professor of Government has been tapped for insight and quoted in The Washington PostThe New York Times, and most recently, The New York Daily News

In a piece by Daily News Washington bureau chief James Warren concerning President Obama’s two-day break from a family vacation on Martha’s Vineyard, Rudalevige says “Obama presumably wants to avoid the mockery Bill Clinton got for doing polling over where he should vacation,” adding, “And I do think presidents are in a tough spot; they need some time for decompression, and that doesn’t really happen even on ‘vacation.’ Nancy Reagan said something like ‘presidents don’t get a vacation, only a change of scenery.”

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An Appleseed a Day Keeps the Doctor Away (The Atlantic)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Wed, 08/20/2014 - 13:02

Christmas TreeJohnny Appleseed is lauded as an “American folk hero” for having planted and emphasized the importance of trees for future generations. As it turns out, there’s science to back his actions — research demonstrates health benefits for those who spend more time with trees.

In one study, gall bladder removal patients recovered faster when their windows looked out over trees as opposed to buildings. And on the flip side, acute respiratory symptoms and deaths associated with pollution are on the rise in areas where a lack of trees provides no defense against pollution. Read more about the current state of trees and pollution in The Atlantic.

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‘Mise-En-Place’ Put in Place in Real Life (NPR)

Bowdoin Daily Sun - Wed, 08/20/2014 - 13:00

cooking128It is a universal principle in the culinary world, especially among highly trained chefs: mise-en-place. The French phrase translates to English as “put in place,” and it is a mantra for having everything you need exactly where you need it, exactly when you need it. No more, no less. Most directly, chefs refer to this principle as they arrange all necessary kitchen tools and ingredients in reliable places at their work station. But it extends to all kinds of tasks — organizing your things for an entire day, internalizing lists, cleaning as you go. Chefs find that the rigor of mise-en-place seeps into all aspects of their lives, and they believe everyone could learn a thing or two from this culinary system of order.

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