Location: Bowdoin / French / courses / Spring 2013

French

Spring 2013

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102. Elementary French II
Katherine Dauge-Roth M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25 Sills-207
A continuation of French 101. A study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary. Emphasis on listening comprehension and spoken French. During the second semester, more stress is placed on reading and writing. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant, plus regular language laboratory assignments.

204. Intermediate French II
Hanetha Vete-Congolo M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Sills-205
Continued development of oral and written skills; course focus shifts from grammar to reading. Short readings from French literature form the basis for the expansion of vocabulary and analytical skills. Active use of French in class discussions and conversation sessions with French assistants. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with teaching fellow.

204. Intermediate French II
Jay Ketner T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Sills-207
Continued development of oral and written skills; course focus shifts from grammar to reading. Short readings from French literature form the basis for the expansion of vocabulary and analytical skills. Active use of French in class discussions and conversation sessions with French assistants. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with teaching fellow.

208. Contemporary France through the Media
Charlotte Daniels T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55 Sills-207
An introduction to contemporary France through newspapers, magazines, television, music, and film. Emphasis is on enhancing communicative proficiency in French and increasing cultural understanding prior to study abroad in France.

208. Contemporary France through the Media
Charlotte Daniels T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Sills-209
An introduction to contemporary France through newspapers, magazines, television, music, and film. Emphasis is on enhancing communicative proficiency in French and increasing cultural understanding prior to study abroad in France.

210. Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Modern French Literature
William VanderWolk T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Sills-207
Introduces students to the literary tradition of France from 1789 to the present. Focus on major authors and literary movements in historical and cultural context.

211. Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Francophone Literature
Hanetha Vete-Congolo M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 Sills-205
Introduces students to the literary tradition of the contemporary Francophone world. Focuses on major authors and literary movements in historical and cultural context.

326. Body Language: Writing Corporeality in France
Katherine Dauge-Roth M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 Sills-111
Analysis of texts and images from early modern literary, philosophical, medical, ecclesiastical, and artistic sources from the sixteenth through eighteenth centuries, as well as of modern film, Web, and textual media, allows students to explore the conflicting roles of early modern bodies through several themes: birth and death, medicine and hygiene, gender and sexuality, social class, race, monstrosity, Catholic and Protestant visions of the body, the royal body, the body politic. Thoughtful comparison and examination of the meanings of the body today encouraged throughout. Conducted in French.

328. Wanderings and Displacements: Shifting Identities in Nineteenth-Century French Literature
Jay Ketner T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Sills-109
Examines mass migration of people and groups in nineteenth-century French literature in order to understand identity in relation to movement and shifts. Through motifs of arrival and departure, nomadism and sedentarism, flânerie, and travel, studies the effects of mass migration and profound social changes on both individual subjects and larger groups. Authors may include Balzac, Stendhal, Lamartine, Mallarmé, Baudelaire, Gide, Colette.