Location: Bowdoin / French / courses

French

Spring 2014

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FREN 1102. Elementary French II.
Katherine Dauge-Roth.

A continuation of French 1101 (101). A study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary. Emphasis on listening comprehension and spoken French. During the second semester, more stress is placed on reading and writing. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

FREN 2204. Intermediate French II.
Charlotte Daniels.

Continued development of oral and written skills; course focus shifts from grammar to reading. Short readings from French literature form the basis for the expansion of vocabulary and analytical skills. Active use of French in class discussions and conversation sessions with French assistants. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with teaching fellow.

FREN 2408A. Contemporary France Through the Media.
Katherine Dauge-Roth.

An introduction to contemporary France through newspapers, magazines, television, music, and film. Emphasis is on enhancing communicative proficiency in French and increasing cultural understanding prior to study abroad in France.

FREN 2408B. Contemporary France through the Media.
Charlotte Daniels.

An introduction to contemporary France through newspapers, magazines, television, music, and film. Emphasis is on enhancing communicative proficiency in French and increasing cultural understanding prior to study abroad in France.

FREN 2410. Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Modern French Literature.
Jay Ketner.

Introduces students to the literary tradition of France from 1789 to the present. Focus on major authors and literary movements in historical and cultural context.

FREN 2411. Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Francophone Literature.
Hanetha Vete-Congolo.

Introduces students to the literary tradition of the contemporary Francophone world. Focuses on major authors and literary movements in historical and cultural context. Conducted in French.

FREN 3205. Urban Fictions in Quebec Literature: The City as a Space of (Quiet) Revolution.
Jay Ketner.

A study of writing identity and the city in Québec novels from the 1960s to the present, considering Montréal as a primary site of foundational cultural and social transformations that continue to engender, through writing, new social possibilities and configurations. Related issues to be examined include how authors write cultural, political, and gender identity; questions of nationalism; marginalization; and the city and text as places for both understanding and imagining a nation. Authors studied may include Gabrielle Roy, Hubert Aquin, Monique LaRue, Jacques Godbout, Nicole Brossard, and Carole David.

FREN 3211. Bringing the Female Maroon to Memory: Female Marronage and Douboutism in French Caribbean Literature.
Hanetha Vete-Congolo.

History has retained the names of great male Caribbean heroes and freedom fighters during slavery such as the Haitians, Mackandal or Toussaint Louverture, the Jamaican, Cudjoe or the Cuban Coba. Enslaved Africans who rebelled against oppression and fled from the plantation system are called maroons and their act, marronage. Except for Queen Nanny of the Jamaican Blue Mountains, only male names have been consecrated as maroons. Yet, enslaved women did fight against slavery and practice marronage. Caribbean writers have made a point of bringing to memory forgotten acts of marronage by women during slavery or shortly thereafter. This course proposes to examine the fictional treatment French-speaking Caribbean authors grant to African or Afro-descent women who historically rebelled against slavery and colonization. The literary works will be studied against the backdrop of “douboutism”, a conceptual framework derived from the common perception about women in the French Caribbean as expressed in the Creole say “fanm doubout” which means “strong woman”. Authors studied may include Suzanne Dracius (Martinique), Fabienne Kanor (Martinique), André Schwart-Bart (Guadeloupe), Maryse Condé (Guadeloupe), Evelyn Trouillot (Haiti). Conducted in French.