Location: Bowdoin / French / courses / Fall 2011

French

Fall 2011

101. Elementary French I
Jay Ketner M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
A study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary. Emphasis on listening comprehension and spoken French. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant, plus regular language laboratory assignments. Primarily open to first- and second-year students who have had two years or less of high school French. A limited number of spaces are available for juniors and seniors.

203. Intermediate French I
Isabelle Choquet M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
A review of basic grammar, which is integrated into more complex patterns of written and spoken French. Short compositions and class discussions require active use of students' acquired knowledge of French. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with teaching fellow.

203. Intermediate French I
Katherine Dauge-Roth M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
A review of basic grammar, which is integrated into more complex patterns of written and spoken French. Short compositions and class discussions require active use of students’ acquired knowledge of French. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with teaching fellow.

205. Advanced French I
Charlotte Daniels T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
Conversation and composition based on a variety of contemporary films and texts about France and Francophone countries. Grammar review and frequent short papers. Emphasis on student participation including short presentations and debates. Three hours per week plus one weekly viewing session for films and weekly conversation session with teaching fellow.

205. Advanced French I
William VanderWolk T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
Conversation and composition based on a variety of contemporary films and texts about France and Francophone countries. Grammar review and frequent short papers. Emphasis on student participation including short presentations and debates. Three hours per week plus one weekly viewing session for films and weekly conversation session with teaching fellow.

207. Francophone Cultures
Isabelle Choquet M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
An introduction to the cultures of various French-speaking regions outside of France. Examines the history, politics, customs, cinema, literature, and the arts of the Francophone world, principally Africa and the Caribbean. Conducted in French.

209. Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Medieval and Early Modern French Literature
Katherine Dauge-Roth M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
An introduction to the literary tradition of France from the Middle Ages to the French Revolution. Students are introduced to major authors and literary movements in their cultural and historical contexts. Conducted in French.

312. Urban Fictions in Quebec Literature
Jay Ketner M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
A study of writing identity and the city in Quebec novels from the 1960s to the present, considering Montreal as a primary site of foundational cultural and social transformations that continue to engender, through writing, new social possibilities and configurations. Related issues to be examined include how authors write cultural, political, and gender identity; questions of nationalism; marginalization; and the city and text as places for both understanding and imagining a nation. Authors studied may include Gabrielle Roy, Hubert Aquin, Monique LaRue, Jacques Godbout, Nicole Brossard, and Carole David.

316. French Theater Production
Charlotte Daniels T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
Students read, analyze, and produce scenes from French plays. At the end of the semester, student groups produce, direct, and perform in one-act plays. Authors studied may include Moliere, Marivaux, Beckett, Ionesco, Sartre, Camus, Genet, Sarraute, and Anouilh. Conducted in French.