Theodore Greene

Assistant Professor of Sociology

Teaching this semester

GSWS 2219/SOC 2219. Deconstructing Masculinities

An introduction to the sociological study of men and masculinities. Investigates debates about the historical, structural, cultural, and personal meanings constructed around masculinity. Explores how masculinity varies historically and across the life span; how it intersects with race, class, gender, sexuality, age, and ability; and how these constructions map onto male and female bodies. Examines how masculinities construct and reproduce power and inequality among men and between men and women. Topics also include, but are not limited to, the production and maintenance of masculinity, the male body, masculine cultures of sports, technology, violence and incarceration, female and queer masculinities.

SOC 2202. Cities and Society

Investigates the political, economic, and sociocultural development of cities and metropolitan areas with a focus on American cities and a spotlight on neighborhoods and local communities. Traces major theories of urbanization and considers how cities also represent contested sites where diverse citizens use urban space to challenge, enact, and resist social change on the local, state, and national levels. Topics include economic and racial/ethnic stratification; the rise and fall of suburban and rural areas; the production and maintenance of real and imagined communities; the production and consumption of culture; crime; immigration; sexuality and gender; and urban citizenship in the global city.

Theo Greene joined the faculty at Bowdoin in 2015. His research, writing, and teaching interests include urban and community sociology, sociological theory, sociology of sexualities, social movements, and the sociology of race, class, and gender.

Greene’s research broadly uses sexual communities to understand how the sociocultural and economic conditions associated with the postindustrial city shape and reconfigure how individuals conceptualize, identify to, and participate in local communities. His current book project, entitled Not in MY Gayborhood: Gay Neighborhoods and the Rise of the Vicarious Citizen, draws on ethnographic, archival, and interview data collected from iconic gay neighborhoods in Washington, DC and Chicago to develop a framework for understanding how community actors legitimate claims of ownership to a neighborhood community in the absence of residential, network, and material ties (vicarious citizenship).

In addition to his ongoing research, Greene is looking forward to incorporating Maine in two projects currently under development: an investigation of how iconic gay neighborhoods adapt to accommodate the increasing needs of LGBT Seniors in cities; and a study on the recent phenomenon of “Brooklynization” in U.S. Cities, based largely in and around Portland neighborhoods.

Education

  • Ph.D. in Sociology and Graduate Certificate in Gender and Sexuality Studies, Northwestern University, 2015
  • M.A. in Sociology, Northwestern University, 2008
  • A.B. in English and History, Georgetown University, 2002

Publications

In Process.
“Street Corner Citizenships: Gay Neighborhoods, Vicarious Citizenship, and the Self-Enfranchisement of LGBT Youth.”

“The Multidimensionality of Safe Spaces.”

Forthcoming.
“Queer Street Families: Place-making and Community Among LGBT Youth of Color in Iconic Gay Neighborhoods.” In After Marriage: The Future of LGBT Research and Scholarship, Vol. 1: Queer Families and Relationships

After Marriage. Michael Yarborough, Angela Jones, and Joseph Nicholas DeFilippis, eds. New York: Routledge.

“Aberrations of Home: Experiences of Community in Gay Neighborhoods as GBQ Men of Color.” The Handbook of Research for Black Males, Theodore Ransaw, et al., eds. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press.

2014.
“Gay Neighborhoods and the Rights of the Vicarious Citizen.” City &Community 13(2): 99 – 118.

Presentations

2017
Speaker. “Street-Corner Citizenship: Queer Youth Placemaking in Iconic Gay Neighborhoods,” American University, October 26.

Presenter. American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 12 – 15, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, “Queer Youth Placemaking in Iconic Gay Neighborhoods.” Thematic Session: “Mobilizing Culture in Divided Cities.”

Presenter. American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 12 – 15, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, “Aberrations of Home: Gay Neighborhoods and the Experiences of Community Among GBQ Men of Color.”

Critic. Eastern Sociological Association, February 23 – 26, Philadelphia, PA “Author-Meets-Critics Session of School’s Out: Gay and Lesbian Teachers in the Classroom by Catherine Connell (University of California Press, 2015).

“Street-Corner Citizenship: Gay Neighborhoods, Vicarious Citizenship, and the Self-Enfranchisement of Queer Youth,” UC Irvine, Department of Sociology Colloquium Series, January 12.

2016
Presenter. CLAGS After Marriage Conference, October 1 – 2, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York, NY “Street Corner Citizenship: Gay Neighborhoods, Vicarious Citizenship, and the Self-Enfranchisement of Queer Youth.”

Panelist. “The Many Nations of the Midcoast,” Think and Drink (Rockland, ME), Maine Humanities Council, December 8. “Gentrification and the Politics of Place,” A Conversation with Brian McCabe – Georgetown University, October 11.

2015
Presenter. Property: Rights of Ownership and Responsibilities of Stewardship in Multidisciplinary Perspective, October 17, Bates College, Lewiston, ME “Street Corner Citizenship: Gay Neighborhoods, Vicarious Citizenship, and the Self-Enfranchisement of Queer Youth.”

Presenter. American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 17 – 21, Chicago, IL “Gay Neighborhoods and the Self-Enfranchisement of Queer Youth.”