Location: Bowdoin / Melissa Rosario

Sociology and Anthropology

Melissa Rosario

Postdoctoral Fellow in Anthropology

Contact Information

mrosario@bowdoin.edu
207-798-4358
Sociology And Anthropology
409 Adams Hall



Fall 2014

  • Puerto Rico: History and Identity (ANTH 1026)
  • The Anthropology of Social Movements: Theories of Justice, Practices of Becoming (ANTH 2218)
  • Puerto Rico: History and Identity (LAS 1026)


M Rosario

Education

  • B.A. Wesleyan
  • M.A., Ph.D. Cornell

Dr. Rosario is a cultural anthropologist interested in the politics of autonomy for Caribbean peoples and marginalized U.S. groups, particularly Puerto Ricans. Given that she works with groups whose possibilities for liberation have been delimited by macropolitical structures and a long history of oppression, she investigates how activists’ experience social change and personal transformation within protest spaces, a knowing that is developed through affective and embodied domains. She had the privilege of learning firsthand about the phenomenological dimensions of radical praxis during her time in Puerto Rico as a researcher, where she observed two exceptional protests: the first system wide strikes at the University of Puerto Rico, and an eight-year old occupation of beachfront lands, el campamento playas pa’l pueblo. She is currently developing a book project tentatively titled, Revolutionary Time: A Treatise on the Cultural Logics of Resistance in Puerto R ico and the Caribbean, based on her dissertation findings.

In her second project, Dr. Rosario explores the relationship between liberation, healing and justice. In particular, she is interested in how activists’ bridge social justice issues with healing practices that challenge the worldwide ecological crisis while alleviating chronic burnout and illness among activists and communities of color alike. In particular, she is interested in what bay area collective Movement Generation have coined as “liberation permaculture,” the notion that oppressed people can draw upon ancient methods of living in balance with their environment to build resilience and regain social, political and economic independence.