Karen M.Teoh

Consortium for Faculty Diversity Post Doctoral Fellow

Phone (207) 721-5183
Title Consortium for Faculty Diversity Post-Doctoral Fellow and Lecturer
Department History
Work Location 23 Hubbard Hall
E-Mail kteoh@bowdoin.edu

Spring 2010

  • The Global Migration of the Overseas Chinese (ASIAN 270)
  • Intermediate Independent Study in History (HIST 291)

Education

Ph.D., History, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 2008
B.A., History, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 1999

Research Interests

Late imperial and modern China, Chinese diaspora and transnationalism, migration, ethnicity, gender, colonialism

Publications

"Exotic Flowers, Modern Girls, Good Citizens: Female Education and Overseas Chinese Identity in British Malaya and Singapore, 1900s-1950s." Twentieth Century China (forthcoming, April 2010)

Book review of Christopher Bayly and Tim Harper, Forgotten Wars: Freedom and Revolution in Southeast Asia, Harvard University Press, 2007. Reviewed for Itinerario: International Journal on the History of European Expansion
and Global Interaction
33: 1 (forthcoming, 2010)

Scholarly Papers and Presentations

“Home is That Which I Adore: Identity Choices and the Remigration of Overseas Chinese Women, 1940s-1960s.” Association of Asian Studies Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, PA, March 2010 (forthcoming).

“Modern Girl, New Woman: Female Education and Adolescence Among the Overseas Chinese of British Malaya and Singapore, 1900s-1950s.” American Historical Association Annual Meeting, New York, NY, January 2009.

“Better Daughters and More Obedient Wives: Class, Ethnicity and Female Education Among the Chinese in British Malaya and Singapore, 1850s-1940s.” History of Education Society Annual Meeting, St. Petersburg, FL, November 2008.

“Exotic Flowers, Modern Women: Overseas Chinese Girls’ Schools in British Malaya and Singapore, 1900s-1940s.” New England Association for Asian Studies Annual Meeting, University of Massachusetts-Boston, October 2008.

“Gender, Education and the Colonial State: British Intervention in Malayan Chinese Girls’ Schools, 1920s-1950s.” 8th Conference on International History: Gender and International Studies, Harvard University, March 2008.

“Modernization and Cultural Conservatism: The Emergence of Chinese Girls’ Schools in British Malaya and Singapore.” New York Conference for Asian Studies Annual Meeting, SUNY-Binghamton, October 2007.

"Home is That Which I Adore: Feminism, Nationalism and Self-Narratives of Repatriated Overseas Chinese Women, 1940s-50s." New England Association for Asian Studies Annual Meeting, University of New Hampshire, October 2007.

“A Girl Without Talent is Therefore Virtuous: Educating Chinese Women in British Malaya and Singapore, 1850s-1960s.” Association for Asian Studies Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, March 2007.

“A Girl Without Talent is Therefore Virtuous: Educating Chinese Women in British Malaya and Singapore, 1850s-1960s.” 9th Southeast Asian Studies Graduate Student Conference, Cornell University, March 2007.