Location: Bowdoin / Allison Cooper

Italian

Allison A. Cooper

Assistant Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures and Cinema Studies

Contact Information

acooper@bowdoin.edu
207-798-4188
Romance Languages And Literatures

Dudley Coe Building - 207



Teaching this semester

ITAL 3077 / CINE 3077. Divas, Stardom, and Celebrity in Modern Italy

Allison Cooper
Before there was Beyoncé there was Borelli; before Clooney there was Mastroianni. Deriving from Italian opera, silent film, and Catholic culture, the diva and her male counterpart, the divo, are performers who know how to stamp any character they play with their own indelible images. Examines how those images are constructed, transmitted, and received from the late nineteenth century to the present day, with special attention to the evolution of Italian screen culture from silent film through to contemporary digital media. Explores how the diva/divo helps to define Italian cinema and television in relation to modern ideologies of celebrity culture and globalization. Conducted in Italian.



Allison Cooper

Education

  • Ph.D., Italian. University of California, Los Angeles.
  • M.A., Italian. University of California, Los Angeles.
  • B.A., English. Knox College.


Research and Teaching Interests

  • Italian modernism and the avant-garde
  • Modern and contemporary Rome
  • Italian cinema 
  • Gender and sexuality studies
  • Language pedagogy and curriculum development


 

Mafia Movies: A Reader. Ed. Dana Renga. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2011

Mafia Movies: A Reader. Ed. Dana Renga. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2011

"Italy's Other Mafias in Italian Film and Television: A Roundtable." In The Italianist. Ed. Alan O'Leary. 33.2 (2013): 190-235. A collaborative essay guest edited by Dana Renga and Allison Cooper examining representations of the Sacra Corona Unita, the 'Ndrangheta and the Banda della Magliana.

“Growing up Camorrista: Antonio and Andrea Frazzi’s Certi bambini.” In Mafia Movies: A Reader. Ed. Dana Renga. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2011. Pp. 346 – 353.

“Gender, Identity, and the Return to Order in the Early Works of Paola Masino.” In Italian Modernism: Italian Culture Between Decadentism and Avant-Garde. Ed. Mario Moroni and Luca Somigli. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2004. Pp. 379 – 399. 

Translation

Co-translator. Michelangelo Antonioni, The Architecture of Vision: Writings and Interviews on Cinema. Ed. Marga Cottino-Jones. New York: Marsilio Publishers, 1996. Reissued by University of Chicago Press, 2007. 

Publications in Progress

Book

Italian Modernism: Italian Culture Between Decadentism and Avant-Garde. Ed. Mario Moroni and Luca Somigli. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2004 Modern Rome between the Sacred and the Profane, an exploration of modern representations of the Eternal City within a broader framework of the dichotomy of the sacred and the profane