Location: Bowdoin / Allison Cooper

Italian

Allison A. Cooper

Assistant Professor of Romance Languages and Cinema Studies

Contact Information

acooper@bowdoin.edu
207-798-4188
Romance Languages
CINEMA STUDIES
207 Dudley Coe Building



Fall 2014

  • Film Narrative (FILM 1101)


Allison Cooper

Education

  • Ph.D., Italian. University of California, Los Angeles.
  • M.A., Italian. University of California, Los Angeles.
  • B.A., English. Knox College.


Research and Teaching Interests

  • Italian modernism and the avant-garde
  • Modern and contemporary Rome
  • Italian cinema 
  • Gender and sexuality studies
  • Language pedagogy and curriculum development


 

Mafia Movies: A Reader. Ed. Dana Renga. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2011

Mafia Movies: A Reader. Ed. Dana Renga. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2011

"Italy's Other Mafias in Italian Film and Television: A Roundtable." In The Italianist. Ed. Alan O'Leary. 33.2 (2013): 190-235. A collaborative essay guest edited by Dana Renga and Allison Cooper examining representations of the Sacra Corona Unita, the 'Ndrangheta and the Banda della Magliana.

“Growing up Camorrista: Antonio and Andrea Frazzi’s Certi bambini.” In Mafia Movies: A Reader. Ed. Dana Renga. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2011. Pp. 346 – 353.

“Gender, Identity, and the Return to Order in the Early Works of Paola Masino.” In Italian Modernism: Italian Culture Between Decadentism and Avant-Garde. Ed. Mario Moroni and Luca Somigli. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2004. Pp. 379 – 399. 

Translation

Co-translator. Michelangelo Antonioni, The Architecture of Vision: Writings and Interviews on Cinema. Ed. Marga Cottino-Jones. New York: Marsilio Publishers, 1996. Reissued by University of Chicago Press, 2007. 

Publications in Progress

Book

Italian Modernism: Italian Culture Between Decadentism and Avant-Garde. Ed. Mario Moroni and Luca Somigli. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2004 Modern Rome between the Sacred and the Profane, an exploration of modern representations of the Eternal City within a broader framework of the dichotomy of the sacred and the profane