Spring 2013 Calendar of Events

Common Hour with Professor Collin Roesler, Karofsky Faculty Encore Lecture

Common Hour with Professor Collin Roesler, Karofsky Faculty Encore Lecture

January 25, 2013 12:30 PM  – 1:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

"A Scientist Looks at the Ocean: Thoughts on Developing Students' Scientific Identity"

Collin Roesler joined Bowdoin College in 2009, teaching oceanography in the Department of Earth and Oceanographic Science. She adheres to the earth system science approach tapping into her degrees in geological, physical, and biological oceanography. Her current research focuses on understanding ocean ecosystem responses to changing climate. She was one of the principle scientists responsible for developing the Gulf of Maine Integrated Coastal Ocean Observing System, which allows scientists, students, and the public to access oceanographic data in real time. She is passionate about teaching and bringing authentic research experiences into the classroom.

Each semester the Karofsky Faculty Encore Lecture features a Bowdoin faculty member chosen by members of the senior class honoring him or her as a teacher and role model.

To view the Spring 2013 Common Hour program in its entirety, please visit us at: Events and Summer Programs: Common Hour.

View Details

National Climate Seminar Conference Call Series: Cutting Carbon at Power Plants

National Climate Seminar Conference Call Series: Cutting Carbon at Power Plants

February 6, 2013 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Adams Hall, Room 111 (Common Room)

Bring a bag lunch and join us for this conference call with Dan Lashof. We will supply drinks and cookies. Dan Lashof is the director of National Resource Defense Council's climate and clean air program and is active in the areas of solutions to global warming, national energy policy, and climate science. Dan is involved in developing federal standards and legislation to place enforceable limits on carbon dioxide and other heat-trapping pollutants and to reduce America's dangerous dependence on oil. He has followed international climate negotiations since their inception and is a lead author of the Special Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change on the role of land-use change and forestry in exacerbating or mitigating global warming. He holds a bachelor's degree in physics and mathematics from Harvard University and a doctorate from the University of California at Berkeley. If you can't make the call, but want to hear the seminar, get the podcast here: Bard,Center for Environmental Policy, National Climate Seminar

View Details

Stuart Kirsch: Corporate Science

Stuart Kirsch: Corporate Science

February 7, 2013 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

A talk from his forthcoming book, Mining Capitalism: Dialectical Relations between Corporations and their Critics. In his talk, Dr. Kirsch will examine how corporations strategically produce and deploy science. Building on critiques of tobacco industry sponsored science and the research practices of the pharmaceutical industry, it draws on long-term ethnography of the mining industry to argue that the problems associated with corporate science are intrinsic to contemporary capitalism rather than restricted to particular firms or industries.

Stuart Kirsch is a Professor of Anthropology at the University of Michigan.

View Details

A Seminar with Stuart Kirsch

A Seminar with Stuart Kirsch

February 8, 2013 2:00 PM  – 3:00 PM
Adams Hall, Room 312 (Soc/Anth Room)

Students and faculty are invited to join a discussion with professor of Anthropology Dr. Stuart Kirsch.

Professor Kirsch has consulted widely on indigenous rights and environmental issues, including work on mining and property rights in the Solomon Islands, compensation for damages caused by nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands, and conservation and development in the Lakekamu River Basin of Papua New Guinea. From 2000-2002, Kirsch was a participant in a collaborative research project on cultural property rights at the University of Cambridge. He was recently funded by ESRC-SSRC to provide a comparative perspective on a joint research project on mining conflicts in Latin America. He is the sponsor of a collaborative research project on mining and corporate social responsibility with several graduate and post-doctoral students. Kirsch also collaborates with Amerindian communities in Suriname on the impact of bauxite mining and a court case on indigenous land rights.

Professor Kirsch received his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1991 and taught at Mount Holyoke College before coming to the University of Michigan in 1995.

View Details

The Climate Reality Project (Richard Jennings)

The Climate Reality Project (Richard Jennings)

February 10, 2013 7:30 PM  – 8:30 PM
Adams Hall, Room 111 (Common Room)

The Climate Reality Project was developed by Al Gore in 2006, and has been refined since then, to reflect current issues and challenges. Floods, fires, droughts, storms all over the globe are portrayed, with the resulting human impacts. The presentation is about the reality of our changing climate, and of the urgent need to take action now to do all we can to moderate and adapt to it.

Richard Jennings was born in Belfast, Maine. He attended Harvard College and Western Reserve Medical School. Richard had a general practice in Maine and then served with the Department of State as Embassy Medical Officer in Belgrade, Yugoslavia.

Dr. Jennings later was a faculty member at Harvard, Tufts, BU and the University of Massachusetts, while practicing psychiatry in the Springfield area. Richard received training for the Climate Reality Project with Al Gore in San Francisco, CA in 2012. His focus is now on the effects of our changing climate, and how we must cope and adapt for the sake of future generations.

View Details

Seminar: Species interactions in a changing ocean: sponge symbioses as models for understanding

Seminar: Species interactions in a changing ocean: sponge symbioses as models for understanding

February 18, 2013 4:00 PM  – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

View Details

National Climate Seminar Conference Call Series: Offshore Wind: Potential and Politics

National Climate Seminar Conference Call Series: Offshore Wind: Potential and Politics

February 20, 2013 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Adams Hall, Room 103 (ES Room)

Bring a bag lunch and join us for this conference call with Mike Tidwell, Founder and Director, Chesapeake Climate Action Network. We'll have drinks and cookies.

Mike Tidwell is founder and director of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network, a grassroots nonprofit organizations dedicated to raising awareness about the impacts and solutions associated with global warming in Maryland, Virginia, and Washington, D.C.. He is also an author and filmmaker who predicted in vivid detail the Katrina hurricane disaster in his 2003 book Bayou Farewell: The Rich Life and Tragic Death of Louisiana's Cajun Coast. His newest book, focusing on Katrina and global warming, is titled The Ravaging Tide: Strange Weather, Future Katrinas, and the Coming Death of America's Coastal Cities. Tidwell's most recent documentary film, We Are All Smith Islanders, vividly depicts the dangers of global warming in Maryland, Virginia, and D.C.
Tidwell has been featured in numerous national media outlets including NBC's Meet the Press, NPR, the New York Times, the Baltimore Sun, and the Washington Post.

If you can't make the call, but want to hear the talk, get the podcast here:
Bard Environmental Policy Center, National Climate Seminar

View Details

Land Grabs in Tanzania: the scramble over nature, food and fuel (Jen Jones)

Land Grabs in Tanzania: the scramble over nature, food and fuel (Jen Jones)

February 20, 2013 1:00 PM  – 2:00 PM
Adams Hall, Room 111 (Common Room)

Tanzania is rich in natural resources, from the Serengeti plains, to the lush forests of Kilimanjaro, and the mangroves & coral reefs of Zanzibar. This natural wealth has contributed to sustained economic growth over the past decade, yet it has not translated into better well-being for the majority of people. Evidence suggests the rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer. Land grabs are one contributing factor to the uneven distribution of benefits. Large swaths of land are being captured by external actors and used for nature conservation, tourism & hunting, biofuel production, carbon credits, and export agriculture. As a result, local people are being displaced from ancestral lands and losing access to resources vital for their livelihoods.

What is driving the scramble for land in Tanzania and who are the winners and losers? What roles do foreign policy and notions of poverty alleviation play in shaping the development landscape? How are international actors, such as conservation BINGOs (Big International Nongovernmental Organizations), multilateral development agencies (i.e. World Bank), and private companies influencing land use change? How are communities navigating these challenges of neoliberal globalization for the 21st century?

Dr. Jennifer Jones is a political ecologist who uses a transdisciplinary approach to explore the relationships between people and other elements of nature. She is Program Director for the International Honors Program Beyond Globalization: Reclaiming Nature, Culture and Justice, and is a Visiting Associate Professor at the Center for Leadership in Global Sustainability at Virginia Tech. Dr. Jones received her Ph.D. from the University of Pretoria.

View Details

Dinner with Jen Jones, Center for Leadership in Global Sustainability

Dinner with Jen Jones, Center for Leadership in Global Sustainability

February 20, 2013 5:30 PM  – 7:00 PM
Thorne Hall, Mitchell North

Please join us for dinner with Dr. Jennifer Jones who will be on campus February 20 to give a talk titled: Land Grabs in Tanzania: the scramble over nature, food and fuel. Please get your dinner and join Dr. Jones in Mitchell North, Thorne Hall.

Dr. Jones is a political ecologist who uses a transdisciplinary approach to explore the relationships between people and other elements of nature. Her interests include international conservation policy, local livelihoods, animal rights, and food justice. She served as a Visiting Professor of Environmental Studies at Williams College, and spent five years in South Africa researching the impacts of protected areas on local communities. She currently serves as Program Director for the International Honors Program on Beyond Globalization: Reclaiming Nature, Culture and Justice, and is a Visiting Associate Professor at the Center for Leadership in Global Sustainability at Virginia Tech. Dr. Jones received her Ph.D. from the University of Pretoria.

View Details

Barbara Putnam presents: Compass Points: Science, Art, and the Arctic

Barbara Putnam presents: Compass Points: Science, Art, and the Arctic

February 26, 2013 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

FACULTY SEMINAR SERIES

Barbara Petter Putnam, Coastal Studies Center Artist in Residence is the featured speaker. Her talk is titled Compass Points: Science, Art, and the Arctic.

Open to faculty and staff.
Buffet lunch $3, or bring your own lunch.

View Details

Greening of Collegiate Sports

Greening of Collegiate Sports

March 1, 2013 12:00 PM  – 1:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Join Alice Henly, Coordinator of the National Resources Defense Council's Collegiate Sports Greening Project, to learn how to use the significant cultural and market influences of sports to promote environmental sustainability at stadiums, among fans, and to the industry's massive supply chain. For more info check out nrdc.org/sports
E-mail Alex Tougas @ atougas@bowdoin.edu to register.

View Details

Chasing Ice

Chasing Ice

March 2, 2013 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Chasing Ice-- a film screening
Saturday, March 2 7:00 pm
Kresge Auditorium

In the spring of 2005, acclaimed environmental photographer James Balog headed to the Arctic on a tricky assignment for National Geographic: to capture images to help tell the story of the Earth's changing climate. Even with a scientific upbringing, Balog had been a skeptic about climate change. But that first trip north opened his eyes to the biggest story in human history and sparked a challenge within him that would put his career and his very well-being at risk.

Chasing Ice is the story of one man's mission to change the tide of history by gathering undeniable evidence of our changing planet. Within months of that first trip to Iceland, the photographer conceived the boldest expedition of his life: The Extreme Ice Survey. With a band of young adventurers in tow, Balog began deploying revolutionary time-lapse cameras across the brutal Arctic to capture a multi-year record of the world's changing glaciers.

As the debate polarizes America and the intensity of natural disasters ramps up globally, Balog finds himself at the end of his tether. Battling untested technology in subzero conditions, he comes face to face with his own mortality. It takes years for Balog to see the fruits of his labor. His hauntingly beautiful videos compress years into seconds and capture ancient mountains of ice in motion as they disappear at a breathtaking rate. Chasing Ice depicts a photographer trying to deliver evidence and hope to our carbon-powered planet.

This event is open to the public free of charge.

StunningTimely--A solitary quest with global implications. [A Critics' Pick] - Neil Genzlinger, The New York Times

View Details

Sustainable Harvests? Rural Development and Conservation in the Wests Forest Landscapes

Sustainable Harvests? Rural Development and Conservation in the Wests Forest Landscapes

March 4, 2013 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

With Maine's vast tracts of corporate and recently-divested forest lands, and with its many struggling timber-dependent communities, our state shares more in common with large Western states than with the rest of New England.

Kathryn DeMaster and Melanie Parker will draw parallels and contrasts between the cultural and economic landscapes of Maine's forested northern rim and the American West, both of which have been shaped by large absentee landowners. In light of Maine's on-going dialogue over development of Plum Creek lands in the Moosehead Lake region, these issues resonate locally.

Kathryn DeMaster's work centers on sustainable agriculture and rural development. She is an Assistant Professor of Agriculture, Society and Food Security at UC Berkeley. Melanie Parker is a charismatic and outspoken national leader in conservation-oriented sustainable rural development. In 2007 in her home state of Montana, Parker helped broker the nation's largest land conservation deal to date, protecting over 310,000 acres under unique conservation easements. She is the Founder and Executive Director of
Northwest Connections.

Together, DeMaster and Parker are investigating opportunities for resilient multifunctional rural development in Montana's Swan Valley.

View Details

Careers in Sustainability: Meet Jerry Knecht, Bowdoin class of 1976

Careers in Sustainability: Meet Jerry Knecht, Bowdoin class of 1976

March 5, 2013 1:00 PM  – 2:00 PM
Moulton Union, North Private Dining Room

Alumnus Jerry Knecht, class of 76 will be giving a talk at Bowdoin next Tuesday night at 7:30pm in Main Lounge, Moulton Union. The subject of the talk is Sustainable Fisheries, but the byline of his talk is perhaps even more interesting - Working Hard to Save Us from Ourselves. Mr. Knecht leads by example. Since his graduation from Bowdoin he has founded a company called North Atlantic Seafood right here in Portland, Maine as well as a company in Indonesia called B.T. Bali Seafood International. However, his goals have expanded to the creation of The Bali Seafood International Collaborative which provides an environmentally sustainable economic platform for fisherman within the local community.

Join us for lunch on Tuesday at 1:00pm for an informal conversation about creating sustainable economic growth and building a career for yourself that includes helping to save us, from us.

View Details

Creating Sustainable Fisheries in the Emerging World: Working hard to save us from ourselves

Creating Sustainable Fisheries in the Emerging World: Working hard to save us from ourselves

March 5, 2013 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Jerry Knecht, '76, is founder and president of North Atlantic Seafood, in Portland, Maine. Mr. Knecht will give a presentation about a joint venture company Bali Seafood International, and a long-term collaborative initiative to design and implement a large scale sustainable fisheries project in Indonesia. The Lesser Sundra Sustainable Fisheries Initiative is being developed with the cooperation of several large Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO's) as well as the Fisheries Ministry of Indonesia. The goal is to take 6 fisheries from the Lesser Sundra area of Indonesia from stock assessment, through stock rebuilding as necessary, and on to certification.

The extreme remoteness and lack of modern infrastructure on Indonesia's islands, have, so far largely protected the Lesser Sundra's aquatic and terrestrial resources from major development. The area has been fished mostly by individual fishermen hand-lining in small boats. However, in the decade industrial vessels and collector boats have come to the area to buy whole round fish as a cheap source of protein and fishmeal. Small boat fishermen, eager for a course of hard currency, sell any fish they can catch to these boats. As the buyers are indiscriminate, all the fish that can be caught can be sold including juveniles, breeding stock, and fish caught using gillnets, fish traps, and other unsustainable fishing methods.

The Bali Seafood International collaborative initiative offers a more environmentally sustainable source of income to the region's fishermen and their respective communities than tourism development, or pirate fishing. Key to the success of the initiative is using economic levers to achieve sustainability goals. By providing a higher price for sustainably caught seafood, the project provides direct economic incentive to local fishermen for fish caught in a sustainable manner.

View Details

National Climate Seminar Conference Call Series: After Sandy, What Next?

National Climate Seminar Conference Call Series: After Sandy, What Next?

March 6, 2013 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Adams Hall, Room 111 (Common Room)

Bring a bag lunch and join us for this conference call with Senior Climate Scientist Brenda Ekwurzel.

Brenda is a senior climate scientist with the Climate & Energy Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS). She is leading UCS's climate science education work aimed at strengthening support for sound U.S. climate policies.

Prior to joining UCS, Dr. Ekwurzel was on the faculty of the University of Arizona Department of Hydrology and Water Resources with a joint appointment in the Geosciences Department. Her specialty is isotope geochemistry, a technique she has used to study climate variability in places as disparate as the Arctic Ocean and the desert Southwest. She has published on topics that include climate variability and fire, isotopic dating of groundwater, Arctic Ocean tracer oceanography, paleohydrology, and coastal sediment erosion. Earlier in her career, Dr. Ekwurzel was a hydrologist, working with communities to protect groundwater sources, at the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection.

She holds a Ph.D. in isotope geochemistry from the Department of Earth Sciences at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and conducted post-doctoral research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in California.
A widely quoted expert on climate change, Dr. Ekwurzel has appeared on ABC News, Good Morning America, CNN, the Fox News Channel and The Colbert Report, and has been cited by the Washington Post, USA Today, the Associated Press and Reuters.

View Details

Sustainable Fisheries Abroad and in the Gulf of Maine [CANCELLED]

Sustainable Fisheries Abroad and in the Gulf of Maine [CANCELLED]

March 6, 2013 4:00 PM  – 5:00 PM
Adams Hall, Room 111 (Common Room)

EVENT CANCELLED

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED.

Jerry Knecht '76, is founder and president of North Atlantic Seafood in Portland Maine.

North Atlantic Seafood is a member of the Gulf of Maine Sustainable Seafood Initiative's Industry Working Group that is engaged in developing ways to support and market sustainable species from the Gulf of Maine. 
Mr. Knecht is also a collaborator on a long-term initiative to design and implement a large-scale sustainable fisheries project in the Lesser Sundra region of Indonesia.

View Details

Community Lecture Series

Community Lecture Series

March 7, 2013 12:30 PM  – 1:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

"Down by the River: Photographing American Waterways 40 Years after the Clean Water Act" by Michael Kolster, associate professor of art.

View Details

The Seed Underground: A Growing Revolution to Save Food

The Seed Underground: A Growing Revolution to Save Food

March 29, 2013 12:30 PM  – 1:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Events with Janisse Ray:

Thursday, March 28th
11:30 am - 12:30 pm: Lunch at the Outing Club
12:30 pm -2:00 pm Shuttle and tours of Milkweed Farm, Brunswick
7:00 pm: Dinner with Students and Faculty at Ladd House (limited seating)

Friday, March 29th
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm Lecture: The Seed Underground: A Growing Revolution to Save Food (Kresge Auditorium), book signing to follow in the Kresge Lobby. The lecture is open to the public free of charge

Janisse Ray is writer, naturalist and activist, and the author of four books of literary nonfiction and a collection of nature poetry. She is on the faculty of Chatham University's low-residency MFA program and is a Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow. She holds an MFA from the University of Montana.
In her most recent book The Seed Underground: A Growing Revolution to Save Food, Ray writes about the renaissance of local food, farming, and place-based culinary traditions taking hold across the country and of something small, critically important, and profoundly at risk that is being overlooked in this local food resurgence: seeds. We are losing our seeds. Of the thousands of seed varieties available at the turn of the 20th century, 94 percent have been lost-forever.

Copies of the book are available at Hatch Science Library and H & L Library, along with free electronic versions on library Kindles.

Join a Book Discussion over lunch or dinner:
Monday, March 25 Dinner with Ian Kline, Mitchell South, Thorne, 5:30-7:00 pm
Tuesday, March 26 Lunch with Sara Cawthon, North Dining Room, Moulton Union, 11:30 am-1:00 pm
Wednesday, March 27 Dinner with Andrew Cushing, North Dining Room, Moulton Union, 5:30- 7:00 pm

View Details

Reaching Day Zero: Living Sustainably at Bowdoin and Beyond

Reaching Day Zero: Living Sustainably at Bowdoin and Beyond

April 2, 2013 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

An interdisciplinary faculty-facilitated conversation on what Bowdoin students can do about climate change and how different fields can contribute to the conversation. Moderated by President Barry Mills and led by a panel featuring Casey Meehan (Education), David Collings (English, Gay and Lesbian Studies), Emily Peterman (EOS), Laura Henry (Government), Mary Lou Zeeman (Math), Barbara Putnam (Visual Arts), and Katy Longley (Bowdoin's Chief Financial and Administrative Officer).

View Details

National Climate Seminar Conference Call Series: Between God and Green

National Climate Seminar Conference Call Series: Between God and Green

April 3, 2013 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Adams Hall, Room 111 (Common Room)

Bring lunch and join us for this conference call.

Katharine K. Wilkinson is a former staff member at the National Resource Defense Council, and author of- Between God & Green: How Evangelicals Are Cultivating a Middle Ground on Climate Change (Oxford University Press).

Despite three decades of scientists' warnings and environmentalists' best efforts, the political will and public engagement necessary to fuel robust action on global climate change remain in short supply. Katharine K. Wilkinson shows that, contrary to popular expectations, faith-based efforts are emerging and strengthening to address this problem. In the US, perhaps none is more significant than evangelical climate care.

Wilkinson reveals how evangelical environmentalists are reshaping not only the landscape of American climate action, but the contours of their own religious community. Though the movement faces complex challenges, climate care leaders continue to leverage evangelicalism's size, dominance, cultural position, ethical resources, and mechanisms of communication to further their cause to bridge God and green.

If you miss the call, but would like to hear the seminar, go the website to find the podcast: Bard Center for Environmental Policy.

View Details

Climate Change - Realities and Opportunities: What Earth's Most Remote Places Tell Us About the State of Our World and the Future

Climate Change - Realities and Opportunities: What Earth's Most Remote Places Tell Us About the State of Our World and the Future

April 4, 2013 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Paul Andrew Mayewski, Director of the Climate Change Institute at the University of Maine, will share his personal experiences of going to some of the Earth's most remote and challenging places, and of the scientific discoveries he and his teams have made there.

He'll describe the journey that they, and the scientific community, have made from a "gradualist" viewpoint - thinking that humanity was an inconsequential observer in a slowly changing climate - to the realization that we are deeply and irrevocably involved in the short - and long - term fate of a temperamental climate capable of dramatic changes in a matter of only a few years.

Mayewski will also discuss discovering the worldwide reach of industrial emissions; their effects on climate, civilization, ecosystems and our individual quality of life; the discovery of abrupt changes in the climate system that revolutionized thinking about climate science; the remarkable success of the Clean Air Act and the Montreal Protocol and how some of the effects can clear up in weeks or months - and others only over centuries.

View Details

Compass Points: Art, Science and the Arctic

Compass Points: Art, Science and the Arctic

April 10, 2013 4:15 PM  – 5:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Barbara Putnam is the 2012-2013 Coastal Studies Artist in residence.

What is the path that an individual takes that leads to a life of art influenced by science? From the Italian Alps to the Arctic, from research station in Manitoba to Bowdoin, this talk will take you on a visual tour of how science informs artistic practice and development.

See the Bowdoin news article about Barbara's class: Drawing on Science.

View Details

'Sustainable' businesses: good partners for environmentalists?

'Sustainable' businesses: good partners for environmentalists?

April 10, 2013 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Four years ago Walmart organized The Sustainability Consortium in cooperation with the Environmental Defense Fund, Conservation International and other environmental groups, plus 80 companies including Stonyfield and 7th Generation.

Their goal is to develop an Index to measure the sustainability of all their products, so customers can be certain they are buying green, and companies can measure progress in meeting their environmental and social goals. Bob Kerr of Pure Strategies helps manage the negotiations.

Is this a promising new way to save the planet?

Robert L. Kerr, is Co-founder and Principal of Pure Strategies, a company that works with organizations to reduce the environmental footprints of their operations and products, and to integrate environmental and social sustainability into their planning and strategic positioning.

View Details

Place, Hope and Conservation: How the oldest species of bird on earth taught one man to adapt to the future

Place, Hope and Conservation: How the oldest species of bird on earth taught one man to adapt to the future

April 11, 2013 4:00 PM  – 5:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Hank Lentfer will discuss the challenges of conservation work in our increasingly consumptive culture, and how having an attachment to place and community can give us greater hope for the future. Using images and sounds gathered from a life embedded on Alaska's wild edge, Hank will explore the role of beauty and wonder to inspire the work of conservation.

Hosted at Bowdoin by the English and History Departments and the Environmental Studies Program. Offered collaboratively by the Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust & The Nature Conservancy. Open to the public free of charge.

View Details

Telling Stories About Data: Writing in Science and Other Quantitative Fields

Telling Stories About Data: Writing in Science and Other Quantitative Fields

April 12, 2013 12:30 PM  – 4:30 PM
Thorne Hall, Daggett Lounge

Telling Stories about Data: Writing in Science and Other Quantitative Fields

A Workshop for Faculty and Students

Led by Judith Swan, Ph.D., Associate Director for Writing in Science and Engineering at Princeton University

Friday, April 12, 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.
Daggett Lounge, Thorne Hall

One of the most frequent pieces of advice given to writers is "Tell a good story!" But because "good" stories are usually defined in terms of plot, narrative arc, and characters, writers in quantitative fields seem to have no stories to tell. In this workshop, we investigate writing in quantitative fields to find the stories we tell about data. How do quantitative readers recognize stories in the absence of people? What makes a good story to readers who are interested in the workings of the external world? Come prepared to engage as readers and writers with both words and numbers.

The workshop will be followed by a reception offering a chance for participants to speak with Judith informally about writing and teaching writing in quantitative fields.

Sponsored by the Faculty Development Committee, the Computation in the Liberal Arts Colloquium, and the Center for Learning and Teaching.

To register for the workshop, e-mail Bonny Labonte (blabonte@bowdoin.edu) by Friday, April 5.

View Details

Mathematics and the Melting Polar Ice Caps

Mathematics and the Melting Polar Ice Caps

April 12, 2013 6:00 PM  – 7:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

 Dr. Kenneth Golden, presents the Dan E. Christie Mathematics Lecture.

Abstract:  
In September of 2012, the area of the Arctic Ocean covered by sea ice reached its lowest level ever recorded in more than three decades of satellite measurements.  In fact, compared to the 1980's and 1990's, this represents a loss of more than half of the summer Arctic sea ice pack. While global climate models generally predict sea ice declines over the 21st century, the precipitous losses observed so far have significantly outpaced most projections.
 
Dr. Golden will discuss how mathematical models of composite materials and statistical physics are being used to study key sea ice processes and to advance how sea ice is represented in climate models. This work is helping to improve projections of the fate of Earth's ice packs, and the response of polar ecosystems. In addition, a video from a 2012 Antarctic expedition where sea ice properties were measured will be shown.

Dr. Golden's photographs are also on display in the Searles Science Building, and in the exhibition Sense of Scale, Measure by Color: Art Science and Mathematics of Planet Earth, at the Bowdoin Museum of Art, April 4 - June 2, 2013.
 
The lecture is aimed at a general audience. Students, high school students and the public are all welcome, free of charge.

Biography:  Kenneth M. Golden is a Professor of Mathematics and Adjunct Professor of Bioengineering at the University of Utah. His scientific interests lie in sea ice, climate change, composite materials, phase transitions, and inverse problems. He has published 56 papers in mathematics, physics, geophysics, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, and biomechanics journals, and given over 350 invited lectures on six continents, including three presentations in the US Congress. Dr. Golden has journeyed seven times to Antarctica and eight times to the Arctic to study sea ice.

In high school he became fascinated by the polar regions, studying satellite images of sea ice at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. As an undergraduate he worked at the US Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory on radar propagation in sea ice, while completing degrees in Mathematics and Physics at Dartmouth College. Dr. Golden received his Ph.D. in Mathematics at the Courant Institute of NYU in 1984. Prior to moving to Utah in 1991, he was an Assistant Professor of Mathematics at Princeton University, and a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow at Rutgers University in mathematical physics.

In 2011 Professor Golden was selected as a Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics for "extraordinary interdisciplinary work on the mathematics of sea ice," and in 2013 he was in the inaugural class of Fellows of the American Mathematical Society. Professor Golden received the University of Utah's highest award for teaching in 2007 and for research in 2012. His polar expeditions and mathematical work have been covered in over 30 newspaper, magazine, and web articles, including profiles in Science and Science News. He has also been interviewed numerous times on radio and television.

Co-sponsored by the Mathematics Department, the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, and NSF Math Climate Research Network.

View Details

Film Screening of YERT by the Green Bowdoin Alliance

Film Screening of YERT by the Green Bowdoin Alliance

April 18, 2013 6:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Adams Hall, Room 111 (Common Room)

3 friends. 50 States. One wild year! Called to action by a planet in peril, three friends hit the road - traveling America with hope, humor . . . and all of their garbage for the year - to explore the good, the bad, and the weird across every state in search of the extraordinary innovators and courageous citizens who are tackling humanity's greatest environmental crises. As the YERT team layers outlandish eco-challenges onto their year-long quest, an unexpected turn of events throws the project for a loop in this award-winning docu-comedy. Featuring Bill McKibben, Wes Jackson, David Orr and more.

View Details

Per Kirkeby's Heavy Metal

Per Kirkeby's Heavy Metal

April 18, 2013 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Sarah K. Rich presents a lecture on Per Kirkeby's bronze sculptures, an important yet understudied dimension of his creative practice. Rich specializes in art produced in the United States and France during the 1950s and 1960s. Her current book project is titled "Past Flat: Other Sides to American Abstraction in the Cold War." Organized in conjunction with the exhibition "Per Kirkeby: Paintings and Sculpture," on view at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

View Details

Switch- a film screening

Switch- a film screening

April 23, 2013 7:30 PM  – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Now playing at more than 300 universities, see the film that's changing the global energy conversation. Nonpartisan, yet revolutionary, Switch unites diverse audiences in a shared understanding of energy.

In Switch, Dr. Scott Tinker gets the straight answers to our most controversial energy questions. He explores the world's premier sites for all energies; coal to solar, oil to biofuels. He talks to the people driving energy today; international leaders of government, industry, and academia. In the end, he cuts through the confusion to discover a oath to our energy future as surprising as it is practical.

Every energy resource- fossil, nuclear and renewable- is undergoing profound changes. And overall, we're gradually shifting from coal and oil to the energies of tomorrow. This sweeping transition is the subject of Switch. But rather than advocate for how it should happen, Switch travels the world to discover how it most likely will happen.

Switch is also about a changing energy conversation. Today, it's polarized and unproductive. Finally, Switch is about changing the way we use energy, to realize the many economic and environmental benefits of efficiency.

See the trailer and learn more at the website
Smart and refreshingly free of hot air- Washington Post
An admirable job untangling the issues- Los Angeles Times

View Details

The flow of energy through the climate system

The flow of energy through the climate system

April 26, 2013 12:30 PM  – 1:30 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

We explore the processes controlling the global mean energy balance of the Earth and the poleward energy transport in the climate system. The global mean planetary albedo is partitioned into a component due to atmospheric reflection (clouds) and a component due to surface reflection. In the global mean, the vast majority (88%) of the planetary albedo is due to atmospheric processes. The surface makes a substantially smaller contribution to the planetary albedo because atmospheric absorption and reflection of incident radiation attenuate the surface's contribution to planetary albedo by a factor of three. In global climate models, the absorbed shortwave radiation differs by 10 W m-2 due to differences in cloud reflection.

The poleward energy transport in the climate system also differs by approximately 20% in global climate models. We partition the poleward energy transport into components due to emitted longwave radiation, incident shortwave radiation, and the spatial structure in planetary albedo due to atmospheric and surface reflection. We find that inter-model differences in poleward energy transport are primarily a consequence of differences in cloud reflection. These results collectively suggest that the global mean energy balance and the strength of the atmospheric circulation in climate models hinge critically on their representation of clouds.
-Aaron Donohoe, Ph.D.'03,  Program in Atmospheres, Oceans and Climate at MIT.

Reception 12:00 pm to 12:30 pm in Searles 314.

View Details

Domestic and International Marine Sanctuaries: Stellwagen Bank as a case study

Domestic and International Marine Sanctuaries: Stellwagen Bank as a case study

May 8, 2013 4:30 PM  – 5:30 PM
Adams Hall, Room 111 (Common Room)

Join Bowdoin seniors Sarah Johnson and Matt Gamache as they present their research on domestic and international marine sanctuaries and their legal and political structures. Their research focuses on Stellwagen Bank, MA and also investigates international attempts to create and monitor marine sanctuaries, comparing the tactics and outcomes of various strategies. The presentation will feature Ben Cowie-Haskell, Assistant Superintendent of the management team at the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. Ben will present some of his research and be able to answer more technical questions.

View Details

Bowdoin and the Common Good: a Celebration of Community

Bowdoin and the Common Good: a Celebration of Community

May 9, 2013 3:30 PM  – 5:00 PM
David Saul Smith Union, Morrell Lounge

Thursday, May 9, 3:30-5:00 pm
Morrell Lounge, Smith Union

This celebration provides an opportunity for students involved in communities through service and research to share their projects and stories about what they have learned as a result of working in partnership with organizations throughout Maine and around the globe.

Join us for local foods including gelato from Gelato Fiasco and Maine-made root beer, and enjoy posters and displays that chronicle a year of the College's public engagement.

All are welcome!

View Details